Loyola University Chicago

Department of Psychology

Patricia Rupert

 

Title: Associate Professor
Office: 342 Coffey Hall
Phone: 773-508-2970

Background Information
Ph.D., University of Kansas
 
Website: PierLab   
 
Classes Taught:
Graduate: Psychopathology, Ethics and Professional Practice
Undergraduate: Abnormal Psychology, Research Methods
 
Research Interests:
My research interests include professional burnout, self-care, work-family balance, and ethical issues related to managed mental health care, confidentiality, and professional relationships. Over the past decade, my lab has completed multiple projects examining factors related to burnout, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction among professional psychologists. In addition, my graduate students have conducted a wide range of projects on ethical and professional issues, including work-family spillover, coping with negative client behaviors and burnout, management of confidentiality with HIV infected clients and with adolescent clients, and use of touch in psychotherapy.
 
Much of our current work is focused on self-care. Under the direction of Katie Dorociak, a graduate student in the lab, we have developed a measure of self-care and are conducting multiple projects examining factors related to self-care among professional psychologists, self-care among graduate students in clinical psychology, and changes in self-care and well-being across the professional life span.  We are also expanding our work and preparing to investigate self-care, burnout, and well-being among mental health professionals who work with trauma victims.
 
Selected Publications:
Rupert, P.A., & Baker, E. K. (in press). Sustaining self-care and thriving as a private practitioner. In S. Walfish, J. Zimmerman, & J.E. Barnett (Eds.), The handbook of private practice. New York:  Oxford University Press.
 
Rupert, P.A., Miller, A.O., & Dorociak, K.E. (2015). Preventing burnout: What does the research tell us? Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 46, 168-174.
 
Rupert, P.A.,  Hartman, E.R.T., & Miller, A.  (2013). Work demands and resources, work-family conflict, and family functioning among practicing psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 44, 283-289.
 
Rupert, P.A., Miller, A.O., Tuminello Hartman, E.R., & Bryant, F.B. (2012).  Predictors of career satisfaction among practicing psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 43, 495-502.
 
Rupert, P.A.,  Stevanovic, P., Hartman, E.R.T., Bryant, F.B., & Miller, A.  (2012). Predicting       work-family conflict and life satisfaction among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 43, 341-348.
 
Rupert, P.A., Stevanovic, P., & Hunley, H.A. (2009) Work-family conflict and burnout among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40, 54-61.
 
Stevanovic, P. & Rupert, P.A. (2009). Work-family spillover and life satisfaction among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research  and Practice, 40, 62-68.
 
Rupert, P.A., & Kent, J.S. (2007). Gender and work setting differences in career- sustaining behaviors and burnout among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38, 88-96.
 
Rupert, P.A., & Morgan, D.J. (2005). Work setting and burnout among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36, 544-550.
 
Rupert, P.A. & Baird, K.A. (2004). Managed care and the independent practice of psychology. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 35, 185-193.
 
Stevanovic, P., & Rupert, P.A. (2004). Career-sustaining behaviors, satisfactions, and stresses of professional psychologists. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 41,301-309. (Summary published in Clinician’s Research Digest, March, 2005.)
 
Stenzel, C.L., & Rupert, P.A. (2004). Psychologists’ use of touch in individual psychotherapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 41, 332-345.