Loyola University Chicago

Department of Psychology

Psychology Career Finder

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Description
An academic psychologist is a psychologist who engages in scholarly and scientific research to advance knowledge within his/her given specialty and share that information via publications, presentations and/or teaching. Academic psychologists typically work in academic or university settings; however, they may also work in university-affiliated institutions such as hospitals.  The topic of their research varies widely across the breadth of psychology (e.g., clinical, cognitive, developmental, environmental, industrial/organizational, neuroscience, perception, personality, social, etc.). Many academic psychologists also teach as a part of their jobs, although the amount of teaching and the audience (e.g., undergraduate students, graduate students, or professional students) varies widely based on the specific job. Competition for "tenure-track" jobs at top universities is very competitive. Tenure means that the person has a guaranteed job for life after the candidate passes a tenure review, typically 5-9 years after beginning their job as a professor. Some academic psychologists take research faculty positions to focus on research instead of teaching. These positions are typically funded from grants and may end after the grant funding concludes (e.g., research assistant professor). Other academic psychologists decide to focus more on teaching by either taking tenure-track jobs at non-research colleges or universities (such as a liberal arts college or community college) or by becoming an "instructor" or "lecturer" whose principle responsibility is teaching.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Regardless of the specific end job, students need to obtain a Bachelor’s degree before attending graduate school to obtain a PhD in their area of specialization. Master's degrees are typically insufficient to get a permanent job as an academic psychologist. Most doctoral degrees take five to seven years to complete. Many students also go on to work as postdoctoral scholars to acquire additional research experience and increase their published work.  They also frequently teach courses either as teaching assistants or instructors during graduate school or during their postdoctoral fellowship(s). 
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • While being a psychology major is great preparation for graduate school in psychology it is not typically essential assuming you know enough about psychology to select your area of specialization (Introduction to Psychology, PSYC 101 is a good place to start for this). Psychology graduate students may have majored in many different areas including biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, neuroscience, physics, or one of the other social sciences to name just a few.  What is critical is some background in statistics and research methods coupled with research experience in psychology or a related field. Note that some areas of specialization (e.g., clinical psychology) may have different requirements so be sure to look at their entries in the Psychology Course Finder for more specific advice.
  • Specific course work will vary widely depending on the area of specialization, however a strong background in statistics (PSYC 304), and research methods (PSYC 306 and advanced lab classes) is essential.  It is strongly recommended that students learn to program a computer (COMP 180 is an excellent choice) as running and analyzing experiments or building computational or statistical models of psychological theories frequently requires programming in languages like Matlab, Python, or R. As neuroscience approaches become more popular across the breadth of psychology topics it is also a good idea to take at least a basic neuroscience course (e.g., Introduction to Neuroscience, PSYC/BIOL 202) to prepare students for neuroscience classes typical during graduate school. Honors in Psychology is also strongly recommended if you are a Psychology Major.  The best way to get specific course recommendations is to discuss your interests with your Psychology Faculty Advisor, who is an Academic Psychologist.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Research experience is absolutely critical to be an academic psychologist. It is important to start considering research opportunities as soon as possible at the undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.  You should have a goal to present one or more conference papers/posters during undergraduate school and if possible earn authorship on a peer-reviewed paper. Discuss with your research mentor the possibility of applying for a LUROP fellowship. It is also strongly recommended that you consider working for several years as a research assistant after undergraduate schooling to build your research experience and collect another letter of recommendation.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.  At least one of these recommendations (and preferably more than one) should know you as a researcher.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate program: https://www.ets.org/greSome psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
  • If you are considering this career path it is strongly recommended that you speak with professors about their career journey and also get to know several graduate students to learn more about their paths.
Resources
 
Description
Business consulting is a broad class of jobs that typically involves going into another organization to help them improve their operations.   Buisness consultants work in many different market sectors including corporate, government, nonprofit and education. People trained in psychology can bring added value because many problems that organizations encounter result from the way people think and interact with each other. Please also consider information under Industrial/Organizational Psychology and Human Resource Professional in the Psychology Career Finder.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
A career in business consulting begins with a Bachelor’s degree.  Many business consults further their career by pursuing Master's and/or doctorate level training in a variety of different fields including management, human resources, industrial/labor relations, statistics, computer science, industrial/organizational psychology, or organizational behavior or organizational development.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  You should consider co-majoring or minoring in BusinessMathematics and Statistics, or  Computer ScienceYou might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Good psychology courses to take include Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PSYC/PHIL 279), Lab:  Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), and Industrial/Organizational Psychology (PSYC 362). In addition you should plan to take courses in finance, management, communications, and administration offered in other programs at Loyola.
  • Make the most of your summers while at Loyola and look for opportunities to intern in business settings. After graduating you should look for an entry level position at a consulting firm.  Additional on the job experience will be important before applying to graduate school.
  • Many graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.  Some programs offered in Business Schools may require the GMAT.
Resources
 
Description
Clinical Neuropsychology is a branch of psychology that is concerned with how the brain and the rest of the nervous system influence a person's cognition and behaviors. It involves applying neuropsychological knowledge to the assessment, management, and rehabilitation of people who have suffered an illness or injury that has resulted in neurocognitive problems.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
In order to practice neuropsychology, one must pursue a doctoral degree in clinical, school, or counseling psychology. The majority of neuropsychologists obtain a Clinical Psychology PhD or PsyD Often, students take some time to build their research skills before pursuing a PhD. Many programs will prefer students work as a Research Assistant in a psychology or neuroscience lab for 1-2 years before applying.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology. You may also consider co-majoring or minoring in Neuroscience (Sample 4-year schedule for Cognitive-Behavioral Track‌).
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Counseling 1 (PSYC 368), Lab in Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), and Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202). Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC 382) is also strongly recommended. It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390).
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
Clinical Psychology is a broad branch in the field of Psychology that focuses on diagnosing and treating mental, emotional and behavioral disorders, integrating the science of psychology with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis and treatment. Psychologists are trained to provide clinical services work in research, education, training and health sectors. Others specialize in areas such as counseling and school psychology. Working with numerous populations, they focus on individual differences, normal and abnormal behavior, mental and emotional health, healthy behaviors and mental disorders and their prevention.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
To qualify for graduate training in Clinical Psychology, students need to have a Bachelor’s degree. The majority of psychologists have a doctorate degree in clinical psychology, though depending on the state, some jobs are available to those with a Master’s degree. Most doctoral degrees take five to seven years to complete. There are two doctorates available:  1) A PhD in Clinical Psychology, which provides a balanced approach between research and clinical training and, 2) A PsyD in Psychology, which emphasizes clinical work. Volunteer or work experience with a human service organization and psychological research experience are very important for a successful application to graduate school. Many students take several years after undergraduate school to develop this part of their application.
 
What you can do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology. You might also consider a co-majoring in Social Work or even the 5-year BSW/MSW program.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331) and Counseling 1 (PSYC 368). It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390). Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202), Community Psychology (PSYC 374) and Psychology of Addiction (PSYC 375) may also be useful. If you are interested in doing research or therapy with children then Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273) is essential and Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are recommended.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is extremely unlikely that you will be admitted to a Clinical Psychology PhD program without significant undergraduate and/or post-baccalaureate research experience. It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level as soon as possible. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some clinical psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
Counseling psychology is a general practice that focuses on how people function personally and in their relationships. It addresses emotional, social, work, health and school concerns that arise in life. Counseling psychologists focus on interactions between people and their environment, and on educational and career development. Counseling psychologists work in a variety of settings, providing various services to different client populations. Some are employed in colleges and universities as teachers, researchers and service providers (e.g., in university counseling centers). Others work in independent practice, providing counseling, assessment and consultation services to individuals, couples, families and organizations. Still others work in community mental health centers, VA hospitals and other medical facilities, health maintenance organizations, rehabilitation agencies, and business and industrial organizations.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Those wishing to pursue a career in counseling psychology should prepare by obtaining a Bachelor's degree in psychology. Experience working in or volunteering with a human service organization is also strongly recommended. At least a Master's degree in counseling psychology is required, but many people go on for a PhD.
 
What you can do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology. You might also consider a double major in Social Work or even the 5-year BSW/MSW program.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), and Counseling 1 (PSYC 368). It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390). Community Psychology (PSYC 374) and Psychology of Addiction (PSYC 375) may also be useful. If you are interested in doing research or therapy with children then Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273) is essential and Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are recommended.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • While you will be training to do interventions in Counseling Psychology graduate school, you will still be expected to do research so having undergraduate research experience is important. It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level as soon as possible. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
 
Description
Data Analyst/Research Assistant is a broad description of people involved in research and data analysis.  Preparation is similar to Research Psychologist, but more positions are available at the entry level.  These individuals may work in corporate, governmental, medical or university settings.  They will work under the direction of research management.  Research Assistants may assist in designing and running experiments and in participant recruitment.  They may also be responsible for programming experiments on the computer.  Data Analysts may be responsible for analyzing data from experiments or large survey or test-based studies.  Research Assistant is frequently a bridge position between undergraduate and graduate school; however, a few individuals do it as a career, particularly if they eventually go to graduate school.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Regardless of the specific end job, students need to obtain a Bachelor’s degree including training in statistics and research methods. Strong research experience during undergraduate school is also necessary to obtain a job without additional graduate training.  Many individuals go onto graduate training either in psychology, neuroscience, or statistics.  Masters degrees that provide additional training in statistics and research methods, and mentored research experience are useful for expanding the scope of jobs available.  To move beyond this position into research management a PhD is typically required.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major or minor in psychology if you are interested in doing psychological research. A strong background in statistics and research methods coupled with research experience in psychology is critical. Depending on your area of interest you might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • In addition to statistics (PSYC 304) and research methods (PSYC 306) students should plan to take a strong complement of advanced lab classes (more than two if possible). Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition (PSYC 314) and Lab in Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315) is a good place to start, but the Lab in Social Psychology (PSYC 321) and/or the Lab in Developmental Psychology (PSYC 318) could also be very useful depending on the eventual area of focus and the type of additional research experience.  Advanced Statistics (PSYC 381) is also recommended if available. It is strongly recommended that students learn to program a computer (COMP 180 is an excellent choice) as running and analyzing experiments as well as building statistical models is critical to the profession.
  • Research experience is absolutely critical to be an educational psychologist. It is important to start considering research opportunities as soon as possible at the undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.   Discuss with your research mentor the possibility of applying for a LUROP fellowship. Presenting a paper or poster at a research conference is also important for this career path.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.  At least one of these recommendations (and preferably more than one) should know you as a researcher. Make sure that research mentor knows you are interested in pursuing this option at least a year in advance of your needing a job so he/she can start to help you look.  Personal connections are almost always the most effective.
  • Many employers will look at your transcript so work on maintaining a competitive GPA. Many graduate programs hae a minimum 3.0 GPA required. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • If you plan to go on for graduate training prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate program: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
  • Search job boards using Psychology Research Assistant or Data Analyst.
  • Make sure to review the information on preparing for graduate school here.
Description
Educational psychologists specialize in how humans learn, by evaluating such factors as learning environments, teaching methods, family and social environment, genetic inheritance and rate of development. These factors translate into variations in intelligence, creativity, cognitive style, motivation and the capacity to process information, communicate and relate to others. To better understand how people learn, educational psychologists evaluate students from various sub-populations, including those with high IQs and learning disabilities. Many educational psychologists consult with organizations that develop textbooks, standardized tests, online classes, and other educational materials.  People often confuse educational psychologists with school psychologists, but educational psychologists primarily conduct research at colleges and universities working closely with educators in schools, while school psychologists generally work directly with students and teachers in schools to optimize learning and provide counseling services. 
 
How to Prepare for this Career
You can begin a career in educational psychology after earning a Master's degree in educational psychology (MEd), however many educational psychologists go onto earn a doctorate (EdD or PhD depending on the program).  Regardless, the focus of all these programs is to learn to build a strong set of skills in conducting educational research. 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in psychology. A strong background in statistics and research methods coupled with research experience in psychology or a related field is important.
  • In addition to statistics (PSYC 304) and research methods (PSYC 306) students should plan to take Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PHIL/PSYC 279), Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273), Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348), Social Psychology (275), Personality Psychology (PSYC 338), and Lab in Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315).   Advanced Statistics (PSYC 381) and Lab in Program Evaluation (PSYC 310) are also recommended if available. It is strongly recommended that students learn to program a computer (COMP 180 is an excellent choice) as running and analyzing experiments as well as building statistical models is critical to the profession.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Research experience is absolutely critical to be an educational psychologist. It is important to start considering research opportunities as soon as possible at the undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.   Discuss with your research mentor the possibility of applying for a LUROP fellowship. 
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.  At least one of these recommendations (and preferably more than one) should know you as a researcher.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate program: https://www.ets.org/greSome psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
Environmental Psychologists are concerned with environmental protection, conservation, and climate. Environmental psychologists focus their research and work on better understanding how human behavior affects our world. They study human responses to natural and technological hazards and examine the influence of different environments, such as offices, homes and urban areas, on loneliness and stress, for example. Climate and environmental psychologists seek to improve the interactions of people with the world around us. They work in areas as varied as human responses to natural and technological hazards, conservation, environmental perception and cognition to loneliness, stress and design.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
The path to becoming an environmental psychologist usually begins with obtaining an undergraduate Bachelor’s degree, obtaining a Master’s degree in a related/relevant field, and obtaining a doctoral degree in Psychology. Each doctoral program in environmental psychology has a different focus and orientation (for example, architecture, ecology, etc.).  For students interested in pursuing a career in environmental psychology, it’s important to augment psychology course work with subjects such as environmental science, cultural geography and natural resource management.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  Please also consider co-majoring in one of the majors offered by the Institute of Environmental Sustainability
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (306). Good psychology courses to take include Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PSYC 279), Lab:  Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), Lab in Social Psychology (PSYC 321) and Environmental Psychology (PSYC 277).
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.  Research with an IES faculty person may also be an excellent fit.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
Forensic and public service psychology applies psychological science and principles to the public safety and judicial systems. Practitioners work within the criminal justice system to solve problems that keep communities safe. Forensic and Public Service Psychologists offer expertise and advise on matters such as mental state of criminal defendants, child custody and family law, violence risk prediction, mediation and dispute resolution, threat assessment, discrimination, civil damages, social science research, and civil commitment — where individuals with symptoms of severe mental illness are ordered by a court into treatment. Psychologists in this field work in a variety of settings including prisons, rehabilitation centers, police departments, courthouses, law firms, schools, government agencies or private practices. 
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Individuals pursuing a career in forensic and public service psychology typically earn a Bachelor’s degree in psychology with a focus on criminology or criminal justice. They may also earn a Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or criminology with a focus on psychology. While there is no single model for becoming a forensic and public service psychologist, a doctoral degree, often in clinical or counseling psychology, is usually required. Such a degree takes five to seven years of graduate study to complete. After the appropriate education, training and experience, these psychologists can apply for board certification, which certifies that they have a high level of professional competence and maturity for their work in forensic psychology. Most positions in the field require board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP).
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major or minor in Psychology at Loyola.  You may also consider co-majoring or minoring in Criminal Justice and Criminology.  
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Counseling 1 (PSYC 368), Psychology and Law (PSYC 372) and Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202). Community Psychology (PSYC 374) and Psychology of Addiction (PSYC 375) may also be useful. It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390). If you are interested in doing research or therapy with children then Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273) is essential and Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are recommended.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is extremely unlikely that you will be admitted to a PhD program without significant undergraduate and/or post-baccalaureate research experience. It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level as soon as possible. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some clinical psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
Health psychology examines how biological, social and psychological factors influence health and illness. Health psychologists use psychological science to promote health, prevent illness and improve health care systems. Health psychologists study the factors that allow people to be healthy, recover from an illness or cope with a chronic condition. They are experts in the intersection of health and behavior and are in demand as a part of integrated health care delivery teams — working with other doctors to provide whole-person health care. Health psychologists apply their expertise in many settings, including private practices, hospitals and primary care programs, universities, corporations, government agencies and specialty practices, such as oncology, pain management, rehabilitation and smoking cessation.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Those wishing to pursue a career in health psychology should prepare by obtaining a Bachelor's degree in psychology. Experience working in or volunteering with a human service organization is also strongly recommended. At least a Master's degree in counseling psychology is required, but many people go on to pursue a PhD.
 
What you can do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology. You might also consider a double major in Social Work or even the 5-year BSW/MSW program.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Counseling 1 (PSYC 368), and Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202). It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390). Community Psychology (PSYC 374) and Psychology of Addiction (PSYC 375) may also be useful. If you are interested in doing research or therapy with children then Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273) is essential and Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are recommended.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • While you will be training to do interventions in Counseling Psychology graduate school, you will still be expected to do research so having undergraduate research experience is important. It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level as soon as possible. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources
Description
With the prevalence of psychology and neuroscience courses increasing in US high schools, students may want to consider training to be a high school teacher whose responsibilities may include teaching these subjects.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
High school teachers in psychology can take one of several paths.  Students can co-major in psychology and secondary education while an undergraduate student.  The Loyola School of Education also requires Psychology majors co-majoring in Secondary Education to obtain a minor in History. If the student is particularly interested in teaching neuroscience another option is to do the BS/MEd Five-year Degree in Biology and Secondary Education and consider taking a minor in neuroscience and/or  psychologyInstead students can major in psychology and/or neuroscience and then obtain a Master's in education to get certification to teach at the high school level. 
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Before beginning a course of study to become a psychology/neuroscience high school teacher, students should schedule an advising appointment with the School of Education
  • In addition to statistics (PSYC 304) and research methods (PSYC 306) students should plan to take as many core classes in psychology as possible.  These include Group A and Group B lecture courses including: Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC/BIOL 202), Psychology and Biology of Perception (PSYC 240), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Learning and Behavior (PSYC 251), Judgment and Decision-Making (PHIL/PSYC 279), Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273), Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), and Psychology of Personality (PSYC 338).  It is also strongly recommended that students take Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348). It is strongly recommended that students also fulfill their capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390) selecting an internship site that involves working with teenage children.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs graduate programs require 3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying to graduate programs.  
Resources
Description
Human Resources Professionals are responsible for recruiting, screening, interviewing, and placing workers in a given organization.  They are responsible for ensuring that employee welfare and employee relations are positive.  They may also be responsible for handling payroll and benefits, and planning and coordinating trainings for employees within the organization. HR professionals may work in a variety of fields or organizations ranging from large corporations to non-profit organizations.  Please also consider information under Industrial/Organizational Psychology in the Psychology Career Finder.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
A career in human resources management begins with a Bachelor’s degree.  It is also helpful to get experience working in an HR department of a company. Many human resource professionals further their career by pursuing Master's and/or doctorate level training in a variety of different fields including human resource management, industrial/organizational psychology, or organizational behavior or development.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  You may also want to consider co-majoring or minoring in Business:  Human Resources, or Business: Management. You might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Good psychology courses to take include Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PSYC/PHIL 279), Lab:  Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), Psychology and the Law (PSYC 374), Industrial/Organizational Psychology (PSYC 362), Community Psychology (PSYC 374), and Understanding Prejudice (PSYC 360). In addition you should plan to take courses in finance, management, communications, and administration offered in other programs at Loyola.
  • Make the most of your summers while at Loyola and look for opportunities to intern in corporate or academic human resource departments. After graduating you should look for an entry level position or consider taking a practicum in an HR department of a company.  Additional on the job experience will be important before applying to graduate school.
  • Many graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.  Other relevant research opportunities may be available in the Quinlan School of Business.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.  Some programs offered in Business Schools may require the GMAT.
Resources
 
Description
Industrial and Organizational psychologists study and assess individual, group and organizational dynamics in the workplace. They focus on assessing individual, group and organizational dynamics and use that research to identify solutions to problems that improve the well-being and performance of an organization and its employees. They address problems that arise in the workplace such as identifying training and developmental needs, optimizing quality of work life, formulating training programs and evaluating their effectiveness, coaching organizational leaders, assessing consumer preferences, and so on. Industrial and Organizational psychologists apply psychological principles and research methods to improve the overall work environment, including performance, communication, professional satisfaction and safety.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
The career path to becoming an industrial/organizational psychologist begins with a Bachelor’s degree in psychology. Most students interested in industrial/organizational psychology go on to earn an advanced degree; a person with a Master’s degree in I/O psychology is often able to find an entry-level position to launch a career. However, those with a doctoral degree will have more employment opportunities in this field.  Organizational Behavior programs also offer Master's and doctorate degrees of interest.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  You may also want to consider co-majoring in Business:  Human Resources, or Business: Management. You might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Good psychology courses to take include Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PSYC/PHIL 279), Lab:  Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), Industrial/Organizational Psychology (PSYC 362), Community Psychology (PSYC 374), and Understanding Prejudice (PSYC 360).
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.  Other relevant research opportunities may be available in the Quinlan School of Business.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.  Some programs offered in Business Schools may require the GMAT.
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Description
Like psychology, law is an incredibly diverse field with may different specializations.  In addition, there are several different common jobs including lawyers and paralegals with very different post-baccalaureate training.  People following these training tracks may work in either private (private practice, corporate, non-profit), public (government and politics), or academic sectors.  You might also want to consider learning more about Forensic and Public Service Psychology by clicking on that entry in the Psychology Career Finder.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Because the law involves working with and understanding people, frequently in difficulty circumstances, psychology is an outstanding major to pursue.  In fact it is one of the three most popular majors for pre-law students. However, depending on the student's specific target field there are many other excellent options as well  People preparing to become lawyers must complete an undergraduate degree and then attend law school. Loyola's Pre-Law Advising provides many excellent resources for undergraduate students interested in ultimately attending law school.  Recently, the prevalence of JD/PhD degrees have been increasing.  These programs are intended for people interested in working in the academic sector and who want to do research on how the law interfaces with other areas of study (e.g., government, environment, neuroscience, development, etc.).  For those interested in being a career paralegal there are certificate programs that provide additional specialized training beyond a Bachelor's or Associate's degree.  For more information on Loyola's program please visit the Institute for Paralegal Studies website.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Major or minor in Psychology at Loyola.  Depending on your specific interests in law you may also consider co-majoring or minoring in Political Science, BusinessCriminal Justice and Criminology, or one of many other majors. A minor in
  • Suggested courses include: Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PHIL/PSYC 279), Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331) and Psychology and Law (PSYC 372). Psychology of Addiction may also be useful (PSYC 375).  If you are interested in ultimately working with children, for instance pursuing marital or family law, then Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273) is essential and Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are recommended.  There are also lots of great opportunities to work with organizations involved in the criminal justice system during Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390), which will help you fulfill your capstone requirement.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • Prepare for the LSAT at least one year before you plan on applying for Law School.  It is recommended that you study 4-6 hours a week for at least 4-6 months before taking the test.

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Description
Market research analysts study market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
A career in market research begins with a Bachelor’s degree.  Some market research analysts may pursue further graduate training in marketing or statistics.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  •  Major in Marketing and major or minor in PsychologyYou should also consider minoring in Statistics, or Computer ScienceYou might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304). Good psychology courses to take include Social Psychology (PSYC 275), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Judgment and Decision Making (PSYC/PHIL 279), Lab:  Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315), and Industrial/Organizational Psychology (PSYC 362).
  • Make the most of your summers while at Loyola and look for opportunities to intern in business settings. After graduating you should look for an entry level marketing position.  Additional on the job experience will be important before applying to graduate school.
  • Many graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.  Some programs offered in Business Schools may require the GMAT.
Resources
 
Description
Many psychology majors are pre-med and are interested in attending medical school or another professional school including training to become a physician's assistant. Perhaps recognizing that the mind is an essential part of the treatment/healling process, psychology is included in the content of the MCAT Exam. Students interested in this career path should review the material on the Loyola Pre-Health Professions Website
 
MD/PhD degrees have recently increased in popularity.  They are highly competitive and require a minimum of 12 years post-baccalaureate to complete school and residency. In addition, MD/PhDs typically go on to pursue post-doctoral fellowships after this training. They are typically completely funded unlike traditional professional schools. Most schools require going through a two tiered application process, first being admitted to medical school, then being considered for graduate school. Students should only consider MD/PhD degrees if they are principally interested in a biomedical research career.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Students interested in pursuing an MD/DO or PA degree should obtain a Bachelors degree.  In addition students need to complete a set of recommended courses (MD, PA) and take the relevant placement exam.  They should also have experience volunteering in a health setting and with biomedical research.  Letters of recommendation are also required. Assuming these other requirements are met admissions to these programs is commonly a composite of course grades and placement exam score.  Help in preparing for a health-related career is available through the Pre-Health Professions Advising Office.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Before beginning this course of study, it is recommended that you meet with a Pre-Health Advisor (Call 773.508.3636 to schedule an appointment or go to Sullivan Center, Suite 255 between 2-4p Monday - Friday).
  • Declare a Major in Psychology.  You may also want to consider the Neuroscience Major.  The Cognitive/Behavioral Track fits best with the Psychology Major.
  • Make sure to take all of the recommended courses for your intended degree (MDPA). Anatomy & Physiology I & II (BIOL 243 & 243) and Neurobiology (BIOL 362) are also recommended. 
  • In Psychology make every effort to take Introduction to Psychology (101), Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Psychology and Biology of Perception (PSYC 240), Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC 382), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273), and Social Psychology (PSYC 275).  There may be health related opportunities for the Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390).
  • Programs will require competitive grades – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Look for opportunities to volunteer at health-related organizations.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • A great way to develop mentoring relationships with faculty and to gain research experience beneficial for applying to professional school is to volunteer in a lab. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here. Also consider Neuroscience faculty for research opportunities. Extensive research experience is critical if applying for MD/PhD programs and should begin during the sophomore year if possible.
  • The MCAT exam is required for Medical School while the GRE is typically required for PA schools.  However, many PA schools will accept the MCAT instead of the GRE.  The two exams are completely different.  The GRE is like an advanced version of the SAT or ACT, while the MCAT is a comprehensive exam covering the information in the recommended undergraduate courses. Both require significant preparation.  You should plan to study for 6 months for either exam, however, the MCAT will likely require 15 hours/week for 6 months while the GRE may only require 4-6 hours/week. Prepare for the MCAT or GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree.  You should not plan to take the MCAT before you have completed all of the required undergraduate courses. Remember you only have one opportunity to get a high GPA, so don't spend all of your time studying for placement exams and neglect courses that you can't take over.  It is frequently a good idea to maximize your GPA and research experience while in undergraduate school and then take two years after college to get a job and to focus on clinical experience and studying for the MCAT, beginning the medical school application process during your second year of work after school.
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Description
Occupational therapy (OT) is a field that assists people across the lifespan to participate in meaningful activities in areas such as activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure, rest, or social participation. Common interventions may include helping children with disabilities to participate in school or helping individuals recover from injury and regain skills. OTs provide individualized evaluations for the client and family, customize the interventions to fit the needs of the client/family, and look at evaluation outcomes.  They may work in a variety of settings including schools, outpatient hospital settings, inpatient hospital units, rehabilitation centers, and long-term care facilities. Students interested in this career path should review the material on the Loyola Pre-Health Professions Website.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
The journey to become an OT begins with obtaining a Bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as Psychology or Biology. Applicants interested in applying to graduate school for OT also volunteer in local schools, hospitals, outpatient rehabilitation centers, or other facilities where OTs traditionally work in order to shadow and obtain observation hours.  OTs need at least a Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy, although go on to obtain a doctorate degree in OT.   In addition, all states require that OTs be licensed by taking the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT).  
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Before beginning this course of study, it is recommended that you meet with a Pre-Health Advisor (Call 773-508-3636 to schedule an appointment or go to Sullivan Center, Suite 255 between 2-4p Monday through Friday).
  • Major in Psychology.  If the student is also interested in Physical Therapy as a career it may be worth considering co-majoring in Exercise Science
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Make every effort to take Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Psychology and Biology of Perception (PSYC 240), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273), Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition, and Lab in Tests and Measurements (PSYC 315). Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC 382), Anatomy & Physiology I & II (BIOL 243 & 243) are also strongly recommended.  Courses in Exercise Science may also be usefulThere may be opportunities at Physical or Occupational Therapy related organization for the Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390).
  • Most programs require a minimum GPA of a C for admissions into the program.  However, many programs will require more competitive grades – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Look for opportunities to volunteer at organizations involved with physical or occupational therapy.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • A great way to develop mentoring relationships with faculty and to gain research experience beneficial for applying for graduate school is to volunteer in a lab. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/gre.

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Description
Rehabilitation psychologists study and work with individuals with disabilities and chronic health conditions to help them overcome daily challenges and improve their quality of life. They often teach their patients how to adapt and make lifestyle choices that promote good health.  They are concerned with factors that contribute to patients’ wellness and recovery including relational support and healthcare provers. Rehabilitation psychologists work in a variety of settings, including academic settings, hospitals, health care centers, inpatient and outpatient physical rehabilitation centers, and assisted living and long-term care facilities. Those who specialize may work in pain and sports injury centers or cardiac rehabilitation facilities. In addition, they serve in community agencies assisting individuals with specific disabilities or chronic illnesses like cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, brain injury or deafness.
 
How to Prepare for this Career

Individuals interested in a career as a rehabilitation psychologist will need to obtain a Bachelor’s degree.  Graduate training options include either a Master’s or a Doctoral degree in rehabilitation psychology, clinical psychology, social work or physical or occupational therapy. Rehabilitation psychologists providing clinical services will need to obtain a state license.

 

What you can do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  You might also consider a double major in Social Work or even the 5-year BSW/MSW program.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Developmental Psychology (273), Cognitive Psychology (250), and Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC 202).  Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are also recommended. It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390). Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250) may also be useful. 
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • While you will be training to do interventions in Counseling Psychology graduate school, you will still be expected to do research so having undergraduate research experience is important. It is important to start considering research opportunities at an undergraduate level as soon as possible. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your graduate degree: https://www.ets.org/greSome psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
Resources

 

Description
Being a research psychologist is very similar to being an academic psychologist, however the individual may work for a non-educational employer including corporations, not-for-profits, or governmental institutions. The research psychologist may focus on scholarly and scientific research or on more applied problems. The topic of their research varies widely across the breadth of psychology (e.g., clinical, cognitive, developmental, environmental, human factors, industrial/organizational, neuroscience, perception, personality, social, etc). Typically research psychologists do not have a major role in education, but they may serve as research mentors in their jobs.
 
How to Prepare for this Career
Regardless of the specific end job, students need to obtain a Bachelor’s degree before attending graduate school to obtain a PhD in their area of specialization. Master's degrees are sometime sufficient to get a permanent job as a research psychologist, however, there are more opportunities for PhDs. Most doctoral degrees take five to seven years to complete. Some students also go on to work as postdoctoral scholars to acquire additional research experience and increase their published work, however, many can go directly into jobs after graduate school.
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • While being a psychology major is great preparation for graduate school in psychology it is not typically essential assuming you know enough about psychology to select your area of specialization (Introduction to Psychology, PSYC 101 is a good place to start for this). Psychology graduate students may have majored in many different things including biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, neuroscience, physics, or one of the other social sciences to name just a few.  What is critical is some background in statistics and research methods coupled with research experience in some related field. Note that some area of specialization (e.g., clinical psychology) may have different requirements so be sure to take a look at their entries in the Psychology Course Finder. Depending on your specific interests and career goals you might also consider the 5-year program in Applied Social Psychology.
  • Specific course work will vary widely depending on the area of specialization, however a strong background in statistics (PSYC 304), and research methods (PSYC 306 and Advanced Lab Classes) is essential.  It is also strongly recommended that students learn to program a computer (COMP 180 is an excellent choice) as running and analyzing experiments or building computational or statistical models of psychological theories frequently requires programming in languages like Matlab, Python, or R. As neuroscience approaches become more popular across the range of topics in psychology it is also a good idea to take at least a basic neuroscience course.  Introduction to Neuroscience (PSYC/BIOL 202) is a good place to start. Honors in Psychology is also strongly recommended if you are a Psychology Major.  The best way to get specific course recommendations is to discuss your specific interests with your Psychology Faculty Advisor.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Research experience is absolutely critical to be an research psychologist. It is important to start considering research opportunities as soon as possible at the undergraduate level. Look into research opportunities within the Psychology Department here.  You should have a goal to present one or more conference papers/posters during undergraduate school and if possible earn authorship on a peer-reviewed paper. It is also strongly recommended that you consider working for several years as a research assistant after undergraduate school to build your research experience and collect another letter of recommendation.
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.  At least one of these recommendations (and preferably more than one) should know you as a researcher.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/greSome psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
  • If you are considering this career path it is strongly recommended that you speak with professors about their career journey and also get to know several graduate students to learn more about their paths.
Resources
 
Description
School psychologists support students’ ability to learn and teachers’ ability to teach. They are concerned with the practice of psychology with children, families, and the learning process.  They are trained to intervene at the individual (student) and system (school) level to implement and evaluate preventive programs and strategies.  They may also provide individual and coup counseling, educational and personality assessments, and determine student placement in special-needs classes.  They focus on areas that improve academic achievement, promote positive behavior and mental health, and support diverse learners, strengthen school and family partnerships, improve school-wide assessment.  They address problems in educational achievement, school adjustment, interpersonal problems related to learning or behavior, chronic situations that influence learning, and problems of instruction and learning environments. Although the majority of school psychologists work in K-12 public schools, they may also provide services in a variety of settings such as: private schools, universities, school district administrations, community-based mental health treatment facilities, and juvenile justice programs. People often confuse school psychologists with educational psychologists, but educational psychologists primarily conduct research at colleges and universities working closely with educators in schools, while school psychologists generally work directly with students and teachers in schools to optimize learning and provide counseling services. 
 
How to Prepare for this Career
The first step to becoming a school psychologist is to earn a Bachelor’s degree.  Majors of interest include psychology and education. A Master’s Degree and a state licensure are required to practice as a school psychologists. As a requirement of school psychology graduate programs, students must complete a 1 year internship in order to graduate.  Some individuals may decide to pursue a doctorate degree in school psychology, which typically involves an additional 2-5 years of study (beyond their Master's degree), in addition to completing an internship. 
 
What You Can Do at Loyola
  • Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Developmental Psychology (PSYC 273), Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 250), Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346), Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) and Counseling 1 (PSYC 368). Community Psychology (PSYC 374) may also be useful. It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390).  Look for an opportunity to do your internship in an educational institution or a service organization working with children or adolescents.
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: LUC.edu/tutoring
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
  • Prepare for the GRE at least one year before you plan on applying for your Master's degree: https://www.ets.org/gre. Some psychology graduate programs require the psychology subject test in addition to the general test.
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Description
Social work is a profession that is concerned with the social functioning and over well-being of individuals, families, and communities.  The field may be divided into micro-social work, which involves working directly with individuals or families and macro-social work, which focuses on working with communities and social policies.  Clinical social workers are able to diagnose and treat mental, behavioral and emotional issues.  They work in a variety of settings including: mental health clinics, child welfare/human services agencies, nursing homes, hospitals, etc. 
 
How to Prepare for this Career
A career in social work begins with a Bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology or a related field or a liberal arts degree. Clinical Social Workers must obtain a Master’s degree and a license in order to practice.  A number of social workers go on to pursue a doctoral degree in social work.  Prior to entering a social work program, many students work in areas such as non-profit organizations, child welfare, community mental health, drug/alcohol rehabilitation, or developmental disabilities. 
 
What you can do at Loyola
  • Major in Psychology.  You should also consider co-majoring in Social Work or even the 5-year BSW/MSW program.
  • Take Statistics (PSYC 304) and Research Methods (PSYC 306). Make every effort to take Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 331), Counseling 1 (PSYC 368), Community Psychology (PSYC 374), Developmental Psychology (273), and Cognitive Psychology (250).   Psychology of Addiction (PSYC 375) Psychopathology of Childhood (PSYC 346) and Psychology of Adolescence (PSYC 348) are also recommended. It is strongly recommended that you fulfill your capstone requirement by doing an Internship in Human Services (PSYC 390)
  • Many programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 – work on maintaining a competitive GPA. If you need help, use Loyola’s great tutoring center as a resource: http://www.luc.edu/tutoring/
  • Get to know your professors – many programs require 2-3 letters of recommendation, so it is important to build relationships with professors who can speak to your strengths and help guide you in the process of applying.
Resources

 

 
Many of these careers require additional graduate training. Make sure to visit the Preparing for Graduate School page.
 
Graduate and Health professional schools have various requirements. Keep in mind that these are general guides. Students must research specific schools of interest for a complete listing of requirements.