Loyola University Chicago

Department of Psychology

Course Offerings

For more information on Psychology courses please review the Psychology Course Matrix.

In spite of some School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS) Online courses having the same course number (PSYC 101, 275, 279, 304, 306, 338, 353, 356, 362) as our courses they are not the same and thus do not count towards the Psychology major or minor in the College of Arts & Sciences.  There are no exceptions to this rule.

Globalization from a psychological perspective. Applying core psychological concepts, research and theory to cross-cultural issues of behavior and development. Topics may include human rights of children, human trafficking, immigration, moral issues of international trade, parenting across cultures.
____________________________________________________
Core Tier I; Does NOT count towards the Major or Minor
Offered every semester
Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior.
____________________________________________________
Core Tier II Societal Knowledge
Required Course for Psychology majors/minors
Offered every semester
Historical and theoretical foci with consideration of: (1) basic anatomy of the nervous system and the physiology of nerve cells; (2) representation in the brain and production of motor behavior; and (3) neural mechanisms of selected "high mental functions" such as learning, memory, psychopathology, perception, motivation, emotion, sleep, and arousal.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or BIOL 102
Group A Lecture; Requirement for PSYC 382 and the Neuroscience Major
Offered every semester
Application of psychological theories, concepts, and research to issues of peace and conflict. Areas covered include international conflicts and international peacebuilding (including war, terrorism, and global environmental issues) as well as interpersonal conflicts and conflict resolution (including crime, family violence, and conflict arising from prejudice and perceived threat). Classic theories of peace are also analyzed and connected to psychological theory and research.
____________________________________________________
Seldom offered
Psychological aspects of parenting are reviewed from the perspectives of both parent and child with consideration given to the effect of developmental, social, and cultural forces. 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites : PSYC 101
Seldom offered
Sexuality as an important aspect of human functioning and its integration into the total person will be emphasized. Topics include: the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of human sexuality, along with sexual dysfunction, and sex roles.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
offered maybe annually
Consideration of theory and research related to the differences between males and females resulting from biological factors, learning, and social roles. Topics include traditional and non-traditional roles, role strain, social and psychological factors influencing role choice, and implications for adults, interpersonal, parental, and work orientations.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 for Psychology Majors; ANTH 100, PLSC 102, PSYC 100 or SOCL 101 for non-majors.
Core Tier II Societal Knowledge
Offered every semester
Consideration of vision and audition emphasizing: (1) historical development of the field; (2) multi-disciplinary scientific approaches; (3) recent research and theory on the mechanisms of seeing and hearing; and (4) applications.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group A Lecture
Offered every semester
Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, storage and retrieval processes, mental imagery, language, thinking, artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, and problem solving.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group A Lecture
Offered every semester
Introduction to the understanding of behavior based on principles of learning and behavior control derived from the study of classical and instrumental (operant) conditioning. Interactions between innate dispositions and experimental factors are discussed, as is the application of conditioning-learning principles to such areas as behavior therapy, education, and self-control.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group A Lecture
Offered annually
Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on personality, maturation, and learning.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Required for more advanced developmental psychology courses (e.g., PSYC 318, 346, 347, 348)
Group B Lecture
Offered every semester
Analysis of human thoughts, feelings and actions as influenced by other people.  Topics include: socialization, perception of self and others, prosocial and antisocial behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence, and group behavior. 
___________________________________
Core Tier II Societal Knowledge
Group B  Lecture
Offered every semester
This course is a study of the different philosophical views regarding the nature and the existence of the mind and its relation to material bodies.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PHIL 130
Group A Lecture
Offered annually
Human behavior is at the root of environmental degradation. This course examines how psychological processes influence behaviors that help or hurt the environment and how psychology can promote conservation. The course identifies theory-based interventions and evaluates their effectiveness. Class activities allow students to practice applying psychology to promote environmental sustainability.
___________________________________
seldom offered
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making.
___________________________________
Prerequisite:  PHIL 130
Course is crosslisted with PHIL 279
Group A Lecture
Core Tier II Philosophical Knowledge
Offered annually
A comparative study of animal behavior with an emphasis on ecology, evolution, and underlying mechanisms. Foraging behavior, defense against predation, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and cognition will be included. 
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
seldom offered
A systematic treatment of the historical roots and foundation of psychology. Special emphasis is placed on relating past trends to current developments in the field.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
seldom offered
Previous math courses recommended. Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and education. Topics include: frequency distribution, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution, correlation, sampling distributions, and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Required Course for Psychology majors/minors and Neuroscience Major (Cognitive/Behavioral Track)
Offered every semester
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 304
Required Course for Psychology majors/minors and Neuroscience Major (Cognitive/Behavioral Track)
Offered every semester
Analysis of language as symbol-behavior specific to humans, language structure and competence, language performance, and the neurophysiological basis of language. Methods for investigating language processing, acquisition, bilingualism, and language disorders will be considered. 
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group A Lecture
Offered maybe annually
Special attention is given to the fundamental skills needed to evaluate human service programs including research methodology and research diplomacy. The strengths and weaknesses of several evaluation strategies will be discussed in terms of scientific validity, ethical constraints, and political acceptability. 
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 306.  PSYC 275 is also recommended. 
Group B Lab
Offered Seldom
Introduces the advanced undergraduate to concepts and techniques used in investigations of nervous system function. The laboratory focus is on the measurement of computer-simulated activity, computer applications to neurobiological data analysis, and the presentation of independent student research.
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306 and one of the following: PSYC 202, 240, or 382
Group A Lab
Offered annually
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing. Experimental design, measurement, and statistical analyses as they relate to research on human cognition.
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306 and either PSYC 250 or 382
Group A Lab
Offered annually
Topics include: theory of psychological testing and assessment; historical context and related legal and ethical considerations; basics of test construction and evaluation, including reliability, validity, and standardization; and common measures of personality, attitudes, and ability and their psychometric properties.  
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; PSYC 331 & 338 Recommended
Group B Lab
Offered every semester
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications to the psychophysical and physiological study of sensory systems. The course stresses the research methods and quantitative measures that are used in characterizing sensory processes, especially visual and auditory systems. 
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306 and either PSYC/BIOL 202 or PSYC 240 
Group A Lab
Offered every 2-3 years
Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of human behavior as a function of the developmental process. Focus is on research within particular developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) as well as research examining changes in behavior across ages.
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 273, 306
Group B  Lab
Offered every semester
Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others.
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 275, 306
Group B  Lab
Offered every semester
Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of aspects of personality. Stress on methodology and selected areas of personality research (e.g., affiliation, the development of personality, self- restraint). 
 
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 is recommended 
Group B Lab
Offered seldom
Lab on Body Image focuses on the scholarly study of body image and eating disorders, as well as how research is conducted in the field.  Students will complete smaller labs and a larger research project in the field.
___________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306
Group B Lab
Offered every semester
Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group B Course
Offered every semester
Facts and principles of personality study. Nature of personality, its structure, development, expression, and measurement. Exposition and evaluation of personality study methods with critical review of traditional and modern theories of personality.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Group B Lecture
Offered every 2-3 years
Review of psychological aspects of women's experiences. Topics include psychological aspects of biological events such as menarche, pregnancy, menopause; aspects of women's work and family roles; and mental health issues relevant to women. This course is for anyone who wants to learn about these issues.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered every 2-3 years
Psychological principles and techniques as applied to the development and maintenance of adaptive and growth-enhancing human behavior. 
 
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered seldom
Consideration of nature and causes of maladjustment, emotional disorders, and learning disabilities in children in conjunction with approaches to prevention and remediation.
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 273
Offered every semester
In-depth study of infancy and childhood using an interdisciplinary approach.  Integration of social, psychological, and biological perspectives. 
___________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 273
Offered seldom
Consideration of the important theories and issues within this period of development, such as juvenile delinquency, sex-role identity, and parent and peer group relationships.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 273
Offered every 2-3 years
Overview of theory and research relevant to middle age and aging. Topics include personality, cognitive and social functioning as well as biological functioning. Applications to life situations, such as living arrangements, provision of health services, and retirement, are discussed. 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 273
Offered seldom
Neuropsychology is the interdisciplinary study of the relation between human brain function and behavior. This course is an undergraduate survey of topics related to neuropsychology, including neuroanatomy,psychophysiology, and cognitive neuroscience. A primary goal of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to neuropsychological concepts in research and applied settings. 
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC/BIOL 202
Offered seldom
Prejudice from a psychological perspective. Applying psychological concepts, research, and theory to understand the origins and consequences of prejudice as well as potential remedies.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 101
Offered every 2-3 years
Study of human behavior in work settings. Topics include principles of employee selection, job analysis, motivation and morale, managerial behavior, organization development and socialization, leadership, conflict management, work design and group process.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered maybe annually
Introduction to the principles, theories, and techniques of therapeutic counseling including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101; PSYC 331 and 338 encouraged.
Offered every semester
Directed readings and formal research proposal on a topic of interest to the student and the faculty member with whom he/she has chosen to work. Students are not restricted to working with the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306, Approval of the department honors advisor see Honors in Psychology
Lab Course/Capstone Course
Offered every semester
Students carry out the research proposed in PSYC 369 and prepare a formal report constituting the honors thesis. Approval of the thesis by the honors committee earns the psychology honors award. PSYC 370 is a capstone course.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 369
Lab Course/Capstone  Course
Offered every semester
Examination of the determinants of political judgments and decision; including topics such as voting preference, stereotypes and political thinking, racism and political behavior, ideology and public opinion, the effect of the media on political thought. 
____________________________________________________
Offered every 2-3 years
Reviews the overlap between the fields of psychology and law, including such areas as repressed memories, eyewitness testimony, scientific jury selection, insanity defense, crime causation, battered spouse defense, and death-qualified juries.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered annually
Health psychology is the field within psychology devoted to understanding psychological and behavioral influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they do become ill. This course offers an overview of this rapidly growing area of psychology. Topics covered include: health behavior and primary prevention, stress and coping, patient-physician interaction, and management of chronic illness. Students will develop a better understanding of the structure of the health care system and the various roles psychologists may play in this system.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered annually
Introduction to the field of community psychology, focusing on methods, social issues, social institutions, and other settings that influence individuals, groups, and organizations. For more information on the field of community psychology please see this description on Community Psychology written by a professor teaching the course.
____________________________________________________
Offered maybe annually
Survey of historical, demographical, and statistical aspects of substance abuse. Abuse of alcohol and drugs, as well as eating disorders, may be considered. A variety of theoretical models (e.g., psychopharmacological, personality, psychodynamic, and sociological) are discussed. Individual, milieu, family, group, behavior modification, and drug therapies are described.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 101
Offered maybe annually
Introduction to the major issues, theories and empirical approaches in the psychology of religion; effect of religion on beliefs, motivations, emotions and behaviors. 
____________________________________________________
Offered maybe annually
Expanded treatment of topics covered in PSYC 304 with emphasis on using standard computer analysis packages (SPSS). 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisite: PSYC 304 or SOCL 301 
Offered seldom
Overview of topics and methodologies used in behavioral and cognitive neuroscience including: attention, learning and memory, language, reasoning, decision making, intelligence, emotions, social cognition, and consciousness. Cross-listed as BIOL 284.
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC/BIOL 202
Requirement for Neuroscience Major
Group A Lecture
Offered every semester
Students will learn how to recognize and navigate the psychological pitfalls that accompany work as a peace activist. Topics include building programs, recruiting volunteers, managing media messages, avoiding burnout, handling conflict within organizations, and securing funding for peace activities. Psychological constructs and theories such as group dynamics, perceived control, learned helplessness, attitude change, and altruism will be used to increase understanding of processes related to peace activism. 
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
Seldom offered
An upper-level, intensive seminar on selected aspects of psychology. 
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 101, other prerequisites may be required depending on the specific course being offered
Offered annually
Lecture/discussions will focus on issues central to behavioral neuroscience, emphasizing human and animal mental processes and neural information processing mechanisms. Students will read primary research papers and practice analytical skills in class discussion and presentations. Presentations and exams will promote critical thinking and a general understanding of current issues in behavioral and cognitive neurosciences.
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC 240 & PSYC 382
Group A Lecture
Offered annually
Students will be trained in various anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurobiological modeling techniques used to study the nervous system and the brain in the laboratory. This course is cross-listed as NEUR 301.
 
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites:  BIOL/PSYC 240 or BIOL 284/PSYC 382 and students must be either a Neuroscience Major or Minor.
Group A Lab
Offered annually
The second of two laboratory courses intended for neuroscience minors; taught in the neuroscience undergraduate teaching facility. Anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurobiological modeling techniques used to study the nervous system and the brain. Prepares students to conduct independent research projects. Includes an independent research project. This course is cross-listed as NEUR 302.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites:  PSYC 388/NEUR 302 and students must be either a Neuroscience Major or Minor.
After discussion with the internship coordinator, students are placed in relevant work settings. Students contract to work for a minimum of 100 hours in return for supervised training in specified areas. Placements are in mental health, applied developmental and industrial settings. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 392 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306. You must apply for this class the semester before you enroll.  Please see Internship in Psychology
Capstone Course, Engaged Learning
Offered every semester
An opportunity for students to conduct independent research under the guidance of a psychology faculty member. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 397 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time. Students must arrange supervision with a psychology faculty member, then contact the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes. PSYC 399 and PSYC 397 may not be counted toward the Psychology major.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: PSYC 306; department and instructor permission. Please see Independent Research
Capstone Course, Engaged Learning
Offered every semester
An upper-level, intensive seminar on selected aspects of psychology. The instructor presents an area in which he/she has a special interest and expertise and for which student interest has been expressed. Topics and instructors vary each semester. Recent topics have included Racism and Prejudice, Exercise and Sport Psychology, Children and the Law, Psychology of Religion, Judgment and Decision-Making.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.  May have other prerequisites depending on the course being offered.
Opportunity for individual reading or research in a specialized area not otherwise covered by the department's course offerings. Students must arrange supervision with a psychology faculty member, then contact the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes. PSYC 399 and PSYC 397 may not both be counted toward the psychology major.
____________________________________________________
Prerequisites: Department and instructor permission.  Please see Independent Research
Learn more about what a course might be like by taking a look at an example syllabus: CAS Syllabus Project