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Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

The image above depicts young Flannery O'Connor reading. In the spirit of cultivating the Catholic intellectual and artistic tradition, CCIH will recommend new and notable books each month that integrate, interrogate, and celebrate Catholicism in dialogue with the world. 
 

October 2017 Recommended Reads

To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and Spirit of Global Expansion, 1520-1767 (2013)
By J. Michelle Molina
This study examines practices of Catholic missionaries in Europe and New Spain from the 1520s through the 1760s in order to demonstrate how the emergence of the Western concept of the "modern self" was enmeshed in the process of early modern Catholic missionary expansion. Emphasizing the centrality of embodied Catholic spiritual practices--such as Jesuit practices meditation, narrative self-reflection, confession, and the spiritual exercises in the development of the idea of "self"-- Molina also investigates the importance of the relationship between spiritual directors and their subjects. Throughout this original retelling of the emergence of the concept of modern "selfhood," Molina poses two important questions: Why does the effort to know and transcend self require so many others? And what can we learn about the inherent intersubjectivity of missionary colonialism?
 
We Are Not Ourselves: A Novel (2015)
By Matthew Thomas
Named to New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2014, Washington Post Top 50 Fiction List for 2014, and Entertainment Weekly Ten Best Fiction Books of 2014, among many other accolades, this novel traces one family's pursuit of the American Dream in New York in the 1940s & 50s. Through the lives of his characters, Thomas charts the movements of an American century, in the process exposing our greatest desires, as well as our greatest failures. The Washington Post praises Thomas for his superb ability to capture "both an individual's life and the universality of that's person experience"-- with a solid eye fixed on Catholic spirituality-- in this stunning piece of literature.
 
A Course in Christian Mysticism: Thomas Merton (2017)
Edited by Jon M. Sweeney with a Foreword by Michael N. McGregor
This collection of Merton's lectures to young monastics at the Abbey of Gethsemani provides a valuable look at Merton the scholar. Covering sixteen centuries of central Christian mystical thinkers, this book is complete with a helpful introduction, which provides background historical and thematic information, as well as study materials at the back of the book, which offer additional reading sources and reflection questions. This compact volume displays the relevance of Merton's thought for any student of Christian mysticism and other spiritual seekers today.
 
Do Guns Make Us Free?: Democracy and the Armed Society (2015)
By Firmin DeBrabander
A crucial examination of the political and philosophical arguments undergirding possibly the most emotionally charged debate taking place in the United States today. In this insightful and eye-opening analysis, DeBrabander interrogates the major claim made by guns rights supporters, led by the National Rifle Association, that the right to unchecked gun ownership safeguards all other citizen rights. As the title indicates, this book offers an alternative viewpoint, demonstrating several reasons why an armed society is, in fact, not a free society-- but one locked in a kind of servility that harms the safety of the citizens and the health of the common good.

 

September 2017 Recommended Reads 

By Pankaj Mishra
Mishra takes a long look at the origins of the great wave of paranoid hatreds that bewilder and terrify us in today's world. Exposing how the promises of modernity-freedom, prosperity, stability-represent broken promises for all but global elites, Mishra explores how those excluded have become increasingly susceptible to demagogues. While not a text in the Catholic intellectual tradition, Mishra takes the religious dimension seriously and questions secularism with insight and alacrity.

Edited by Miguel A. De La Torre
Featuring an essay by LUC's own Miguel Diaz, John Courtney Murray University Chair in Public Service, this book offers reflections from notable religious leaders and scholars about the political and confessional crises that currently threaten not only our republic, but also our most deeply held religious claims and values.

Edited by Thomas Banchoff & José Casanova
What do the Jesuits tell us about globalization, and what can globalization tell us about the Jesuits? Banchoff and Casanova present a multidisciplinary exploration into what we can learn from the historical and contemporary experience of the Society of Jesus.

By Alice McDermott 
Set in 1940s/50s Catholic Brooklyn, this novel weaves the story of one Irish immigrant family through three generations. Revealing along the way a wholly individual and universal understanding of the human condition, the story tests the limits of love and sacrifice, of forgiveness and forgetfulness. Alice McDermott is not only a gifted novelist, but a leading practitioner of the Catholic Imagination.

By Brad S. Gregory
Just in time for the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation, Notre Dame Historian Brad Gregory examines the complicated legacy of Martin Luther and how his unintended yet epochal movement continues to shape the world today.