Loyola University Chicago

Department of Classical Studies

Departmental catalogue

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Basic catalogue descriptions and permanent cross-listings:   

University Core Literary Foundations (UCLR)

  • UCLR 100 - Interpreting Literature
    • The foundational course of literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical term, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier I; this class will be a prerequisite for all second tier literature courses, as designated by each department
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, Su15, F15

Classical Civilization (CLST)

  • CLST 101 - Introduction to Classical Hebrew I
    • The sound, forms and grammar of biblical language. Selected readings from the Old Testament. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of Biblical Hebrew.
    • cross-list: THEO 308, THEO 406
  • CLST 102 - Introduction to Classical Hebrew II
    • Further study of biblical language. Selected readings from the Old Testament. Students will demonstrate an understanding of Biblical Hebrew.
    • pre-requisite: CLST 101 / THEO 308 / THEO 406
    • cross-list: THEO 309, THEO 407
  • CLST 131 - English Use of Latin & Greek
    • This course investigates derivations of English words through analysis of their ancient Greek and Latin elements. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of noun- and verb-roots, cognates, morphemes, and other linguistic elements deriving from ancient Greek and Latin, as well as enhanced knowledge of English vocabulary and understanding of its appropriate uses.
  • CLST 206 - Art of Ancient Greece
    • This course is an introduction to the art of the ancient Greek world from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period (to c. 50 B.C.E.), focusing on major trends and developments in Classical Greek architecture, sculpture, pottery and painting through close study of individual examples. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize and interpret selected examples of ancient Greek art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, and other types; they should be able to apply their art-critical and appreciation skills to other types of art.
    • cross-list: FNAR 336
    • Core: Artistic Knowledge and Experience
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Su15 (Greece), F15 (Chicago and Rome)
  • CLST 207 - Art of the Roman World
    • This course is an introduction to the art of the Roman world from c. 3000 B.C.E. to c. the fifth century CE. It focuses on major trends and developments in Etruscan, Roman and later Greek art, including architecture, painting, mosaic, and sculpture through close study of individual examples. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize and interpret selected examples of ancient Roman art, including painting, mosaic, sculpture, architecture, and other types; they will be able to apply their art-critical and appreciation skills to other types of art.
    • cross-list: FNAR 337, ROST 307
    • Core: Artistic Knowledge and Experience
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15 (Rome)
  • CLST 241 - Religions of Ancient Greece
    • This course examines the beliefs and practices in ancient Greek religion by studying the written, artistic, and archaeological evidence for their forms and functions and the environment in which they flourished. Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of ancient Greek religions.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14
  • CLST 267 - Medical and Scientific Terminology in Context [NEWLY REDEVELOPED!!]
    • This course focuses on the ancient Greek and Latin roots of terminology relating to the sciences, especially medical science. The development and changes in the scientific paradigm are explored through readings in translation of a variety of ancient thinkers from Greece and Rome. Outcomes: Students will understand the basic components and underlying principles of word formation for use in scientific fields; they will understand the perspectives of ancient scientific inquiry.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp16
  • CLST 271 - Classical Mythology and CLST 271G - Classical Mythology, Women/Gender Focus
    • This course focuses on Greek and Roman literature involving myth and how ancient and modern peoples use traditional narratives, characters, images and conceptions to explore, explain, and experiment with ideas about themselves and their surroundings in their historical, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. (CLST 271G focuses, within this field, on concerns of women's studies and gender studies.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental myths of the ancient Greek and Roman world, their language and possible meanings, and how myth reflected important collective and individual concerns, values, beliefs, and practices then, even as modern myth does now.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, Su14, F14
  • CLST 272 - Heroes and Classical Epics
    • This course centers upon the epics of the ancient Mediterranean world, their nature and significance, and, especially, the concepts of heroes and heroism. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of ancient epic as a literary genre, what heroes are and why they are featured in epics, and how epics began and evolved to reflect audiences and their social, cultural, political and other concerns, values (such as leadership) beliefs and practices.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, Su14, F14
  • CLST 273 - Classical Tragedy and CLST 273G - Classical Tragedy, Women/Gender Focus
    • This course introduces students to extant Greek tragic drama, especially through the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. (CLST 273G focuses, within this field, on concerns of women's studies and gender studies.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of plot, characters and themes in Greek drama; understanding of the historical, social and cultural conditions implicated with each work; comprehension of concerns and values contained in them, such as justice, and how these are mirrored in modern literature and drama.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, F15
  • CLST 274 - World of Archaic Greece
    • This course investigates the history, literature, art, culture and society of Archaic Greece (c. 750-480 B.C.E.), the precursor of Classical Greece and western civilization. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social accomplishments, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
    • Core: Historical Knowledge, Tier II
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • CLST 275 - World of Classical Greece
    • This course investigates the history, literature, art, culture and society of Classical Greece (c. 480 B.C.E. to c. 300 B.C.E.), the origin of so much that has impacted western civilization; its primary focus is Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social accomplishments, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
    • Core: Historical Knowledge, Tier II
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • CLST 276 - World of Classical Rome
    • This course investigates the historical development of the Roman people through study of their history, politics, society and culture especially in the 1st centuries B.C.E. and C.E., the turning points of Republican and Imperial Rome. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social accomplishments, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
    • cross-list: ROST 276
    • course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Core: Historical Knowledge, Tier II
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15 (Rome), F15 (Chicago and Rome)
  • CLST 277 - World of Late Antiquity
    • This course investigates the historical development of the Roman Empire in the 3rd to 5th centuries C.E. when the Mediterranean basin and Europe re-evaluated their classical past and decisively set their course toward Medieval and later governmental, religious and cultural history. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social accomplishments, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
    • Core: Historical Knowledge, Tier II
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14 (Rome)
  • CLST 279 - Classical Rhetoric
    • This course explores how ancient Greeks and Romans practiced and interrogated the 'craft of speech' (rhetorike techne), specifically persuasive speech, especially as it would be delivered in public settings. Outcome: Students will learn to assess the relationship of Classical rhetorical literature to the world that produced and used it.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • CLST 280 - The Romance Novel in the Ancient World
    • This course introduces students to the ancient masterworks of Greek and Roman fiction in the form of the novel. Outcome: Students should be able to appreciate and explain the ancient romance novel, including the components of structure, characterization, theme, narrative technique, style, and meaning.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • CLST 281 - War and War Experience, Ancient and Modern
    • This course focuses upon the institution of war and its effects upon individuals, especially in ancient Greece and modern times. Outcome: Students should be able to understand better and demonstrate knowledge of the many levels of active and passive war experience, including participant/observer, combatant/non-combatant, and various groups in and out of war, ancient and modern.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • CLST 283 - Classical Comedy and Satire
    • In this course, students engage with great literary works of the ancient world that combine social criticism with humor. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of such authors as Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Petronius, and their works, including the components of plot, characters and themes in the main works of ancient comedy and satire; as well as understanding of the historical, social and cultural conditions implicated with each work.
    • Core: Literary Knowledge, Tier II
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, Su15
  • CLST 288 - Greek Literature in Translation
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in ancient Greek literature. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of selected Greek literature and its possible interpretations.
    • Course attribute: Catholic Studies (designated sections)
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 289 - Latin Literature in Translation
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Latin literature. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of selected Latin literature and its possible interpretations.
    • cross-list: ROST 289
    • Course attribute: Catholic Studies (designated sections)
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 295 - Women in the Classical World
    • This course investigates the social roles available to women in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, together with beliefs, behaviors, and cultural expressions supporting ancient Greek and Roman constructions of womanhood. Outcome: Students should be able to identify and discuss distinctive Classical patterns of thought and behavior regarding women and gender.
    • cross-list: WSGS 295
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
  • CLST 304 - History of Ancient Philosophy
    • This course studies the philosophies of the ancient Greeks, including the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers representative of the ancient Greek philosophers.
    • pre-requisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.
    • cross-list: PHIL 304
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15, F15
  • CLST 305 - Ancient Political Thought
    • A study of major political theorists from Plato to the fall of the Roman republic. Outcome: Students will learn to interpret and evaluate the assumptions and principles guiding the writings of major Ancient Greek and early Roman political theorists.
    • cross-list: PLSC 304
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
  • CLST 308 - History of Rome to Constantine
    • This course surveys ancient Roman history, with a focus on Rome's conquest of the Mediterranean, the civil wars that ended the Roman Republic, the good and bad emperors of the Principate, and the conversion of Constantine to Christianity. Outcome: Students will understand the interrelationship among political, social, economic, and cultural developments and develop their research and writing skills.
    • cross-list: HIST 308, ROST 308
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14 (Rome)
  • CLST 309 - Greece to Alexander the Great
    • This course explores ancient Greek history, society and culture, from the Bronze Age through the period of Classical Greece ending with Alexander and his empire. Outcome: Students will be able to evaluate and interpret different types of sources critically and explain how these affect our understanding of the ancient Greeks.
    • cross-list: HIST 307
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
    • Recently scheduled: F14 (Rome)
  • CLST 315 - Alexander and the Hellenistic World
    • This course centers on the history, literature, art, culture and society of the Hellenistic world from 336 to c. 31 B.C.E. and assays the impact of Alexander the Great particularly in the eastern Mediterranean, the site of the kingdoms established by the successors of Alexander; a particular focus is Egypt and its capital, Alexandria. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the significant political, cultural and social events, institutions, questions, and concerns, and the major figures of the age.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 316 - Western Patristic Thought
    • This course centers on first-hand study of the leading voices of early Christianity in the western portion of the Roman Empire, from the first century C.E. to Augustine. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge about the western Church fathers, their works, and the impact of these upon the Church and its teachings.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 324 - Shipwreck Archaeology
    • Students study how the technology of scuba diving combined with scientific archaeology has created a new discipline of shipwreck archaeology since the 1960s. They follow the history of the discipline and explore shipwrecks from Bronze Age Greece to nineteenth-century Chicago. Outcome: Students understand the importance of vessels conserved at Skuldelev, Lake Nemi and Uluburun for tracing the development of commerce and technology among the Vikings, the Romans, and the Syro-Palestinians of the Levant. They synthesize the research and conclusions of nautical archaeologists worldwide and organize those findings for presentation to a broader public in the coherent and imaginative form of their own Museum.
    • cross-list: ANTH 347, HIST 324
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Recently scheduled: F14
  • CLST 328 - Pompeii and Herculaneum
    • The two best known Roman towns - Pompeii and Herculaneum - whose remains were preserved by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE - will serve as a microcosm for understanding Roman society. Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of how recent archaeological discoveries have changed our view of Pompeii and Herculaneum and learn to "read" such things as dining and bathing rituals, gladiator games, and public and private architecture to gain insight into the structures of Roman social and cultural life.
    • cross-list: ANTH 328, HIST 328
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream OR History-Society-Culture stream (no one course may count for more than one area in any one individual's program)
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 334 - Introduction to Classical Archaeology
    • This course focuses on the main explorations and achievements in the recovery of monuments of the ancient Greco-Roman world and on the methodologies involved with the recoveries. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize and interpret selected sites and monuments of the Greco-Roman world. They should be able to demonstrate knowledge of methodologies and the technical vocabulary of classical archaeology.
    • cross-list: ANTH 334
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Currently scheduled: F15 (Rome)
  • CLST 340 - Classical Archaeology: Greek Temples
    • This course centers on the art and architecture of selected ancient Greek temples and upon the methodologies involved with their study and understanding. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize and interpret selected Greek temples and demonstrate knowledge of the methodologies and technical vocabulary associated with them.
    • cross-list: ANTH 340
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 342 - Geography of the Ancient World
    • This course focuses on the history of, ideas relating to, and expressions about the geography of the ancient Greco-Roman world as a background for the study of the ancient Mediterranean world. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the significant authors, texts, and concepts relating to ancient Mediterranean geography. They should be able to demonstrate good comprehension of technical terms associated with that geography.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream OR History-Society-Culture stream (no one course may count for more than one area in any one individual's program)
  • CLST 344 - Ancient Greek and Roman Coins
    • This course centers on the numismatics of the ancient Mediterranean world and upon coins as sources for the history, art, epigraphy and mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. Outcome: Students should be able to recognize, assess and interpret various types of Greek and Roman coins. They should be able to demonstrate good comprehension of technical terms associated with ancient Mediterranean numismatics.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
  • CLST 348 - Introduction to Museum Studies
    • In collecting, preserving, interpreting, and presenting items of material cultures, as the 20th century recognized and reconsidered, museums function as mass-media, social "tracers" as well as "objects-subjects" for economic and political elaboration. This course introduces students to relevant concerns of objects, conceptualization and communication, scholarship, cultural property, and identity. Outcome: Students will gain understanding of how museums conserve cultural artifacts, serve academic research, educate specialist and non-specialist audiences, and focus social energy in local and touristic communities.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15 (Rome)
  • CLST 361 - Roman Political Theory and Practice
    • This course investigates the history, scope, principles and components of ancient Roman political institutions from earliest times to that of Justinian. Outcome: Students should be able to explain constituents of Roman civil and legislative procedure, including assemblies, magistracies, courts, etc., as well as the legal appurtenances of those constituents.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 362 - Roman Law
    • This course investigates the history, scope, principles and components of Roman civil and private law from the archaic period to Justinian's codification. Outcome: Students should be able to explain Roman legal and civil procedure, including the legal concepts of property, the person, family law, and legal obligations and issues, including contracts, civil wrongs, etc.
    • cross-list: PLSC 371, ROST 362
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • CLST 363 - Law & Legislature of Ancient Greece
    • This course investigates the history, scope, principles and components of ancient Greek law and legislation from Homeric times through the Classical Period. Outcome: Students should be able to explain Greek legal, civil and legislative procedure, including concepts of justice and due process, as well as legal issues such as inheritance, homicide, etc., especially in Classical Athens.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 373 - Daily Life in Ancient Greece
    • This course constitutes an investigation of the lives of individuals amidst the societies of ancient Greece, including, among other topics, their involvement in religion, politics, education, and their gender-relations. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of what it was like to be alive and active in ancient Greece, what important issues and concerns affected the ancient Greeks and how these are to be compared and contrasted with their own life issues and concerns.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 374 - Private Life of Ancient Romans
    • This course constitutes an investigation of the lives of individuals amidst the society of ancient Rome (and the Roman Empire), including, among other things, their involvements in religion, politics, education, and their gender-relations. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of what it was like to be alive and active in ancient Rome, what important issues and concerns affected the ancient Romans (and subjects of Rome) individually, and how these are to be compared and contrasted with their own life issues and concerns.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 375 - Archaeology of Early Greece
    • This course surveys archaeological research in Greece covering the Paleolithic Age through the early Iron Age (c. 700 B.C.E.). Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the main archaeological sites and their contents and the importance of archaeological material for reconstructing knowledge about the period; students should also be able to demonstrate knowledge of archaeological methodology and how evidence is gathered, classified and interpreted.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 376 - Homeric Questions
    • An advanced course in the Iliad and/or Odyssey enriched by study of Homeric scholarship from the time of Wolf's' Prolegomena (1795) to the present day. Concentrations can include such key issues as "the Homeric question," the Parry-Lord theory, narratology, rhetorical criticism, and the psychiatric interpretations of Dr. Jonathan Shay. Outcomes: Students will be able to place the Homeric poems into their historical and literary context; and summarize, critique, and synthesize the critical approaches to the poems. 
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
  • CLST 378 - Sport in Ancient Greece & Rome
    • This course focuses on the practices of and attitudes toward athletics of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge about the educational, philosophical, and political significance of athletics from Homeric times through the Roman Empire. They should be able to assess and interpret written, artistic and archaeological evidence relating to ancient athletics.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream
  • CLST 380 - Research in Classical Studies
    • Students complete a semester-long research project on a topic in Classical Studies. (This is a special study course, carried on by students usually under the direction of a faculty member of the department.) Outcomes: Students will improve research methods and produce a research paper that engages with both primary sources and secondary scholarship.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils University Engaged Learning requirement
  • CLST 381 - Directed Study
    • This course is centered on extensive and in-depth study of a selected author or topic involving ancient Greece or Rome. (This is a special study course, carried on by students usually under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Variable credit hours, 1-3.). Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper understanding of the selected author or topic.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
  • CLST 382 - Internship in Classical Studies
    • Students complete a semester-long internship (100 hours minimum) that builds on their training in Classical Studies. Outcomes: Students will gain practical experience while applying theories and techniques from coursework in Classical Studies.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils University Engaged Learning requirement
  • CLST 383 - The Humanism of Antiquity I
    • This course is centered on extensive readings of pertinent classical authors from Homer to Plato, tracing the evolution of aspects of human belief. (This is a capstone course for majors in Classical Studies.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper understanding of the nature of the human individual and the relationship of the human person both to the material and spiritual world. They should be able to assess and interpret ancient Greek texts concerned with these issues and topics.
    • Fulfils part of the capstone requirement of the majors in and minors in Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • CLST 384 - The Humanism of Antiquity II
    • This course is centered on extensive readings of pertinent classical authors from early Rome to the High Empire, tracing the evolution of aspects of human belief. (This is a capstone course for majors in Classical Studies.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper understanding of the nature of the human individual and the relationship of the human person both to the material and spiritual world. They should be able to assess and interpret ancient Latin texts concerned with these issues and topics.
    • Fulfils part of the capstone requirement of the majors in and minors in Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • CLST 385 - History of Classical Greek Literature to AD 200
    • This course surveys important authors and works of Greek literature in a chronological and topical fashion from Homer to the Hellenistic period. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of authors and works; they should be able to assess and interpret texts covered.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • CLST 386 - History of Classical Roman Literature
    • This course surveys important authors and works of Roman (i.e., Latin) literature in a chronological and topical fashion from the 2nd cent. B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of authors and works; they should be able to assess and interpret texts covered.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 388 - Classical Backgrounds I
    • This course explores various environments of Greek literature, art, religion, etc., or other aspects of Greek civilization. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper understanding of the nature of these environments or aspects.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • CLST 389 - Classical Backgrounds II
    • This course explores various environments of Latin literature, Roman art, religion, etc., or other aspects of Roman civilization. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper understanding of the nature of these environments or aspects.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Roman culture
  • CLST 390 - Fieldwork in Greek Sites & Museums
    • This course comprises a study Greek or Roman art, monuments, topography or other cultural or historical artifacts or areas of interest on site. This study is accomplished through illustrated lectures or (when on-site) on-site lectures. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of the material remains of ancient Mediterranean civilizations and the cultures within them.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream
    • Currently scheduled: Su15
  • CLST 391 - Topics in Comparative Literature
    • This course centers on a comparison of ancient Greek or Roman literature with literatures of other times and other cultures. (This is a special topics course.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of the authors and works chosen for it.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
  • CLST 392 - Theories of Myth
    • This course surveys important theoretical models used to interpret the mythology of Classical Greece and Rome and other cultures. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of different interpretive theories applicable to mythology, their advantages and limitations. They should be able to apply these theories and to demonstrate what learning may be derived from them.
    • cross-list: LITR 392
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • History-Society-Culture stream OR Literature-Language stream (no one course may count for more than one area in any one individual's program)
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14
  • CLST 395 - Topography of Rome
    • The subject of this course is the topography and monuments of ancient Rome, from the city's beginnings through the Republican and Imperial periods to the time of Constantine. This study is accomplished through illustrated lectures or (when taught in Rome) on-site lectures. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate detailed knowledge of the history of the buildings and monuments of ancient Rome.
    • cross-list: ROST 395
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Art-Archaeology stream OR History-Society-Culture stream (no one course may count for more than one area in any one individual's program)
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15 (Rome)

Ancient Greek (GREK)

  • GREK 101 - Ancient Greek I
    • This course introduces students to elementary grammatical forms, basic syntax, and vocabulary of ancient Greek, and simple readings in the language. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of ancient Greek vocabulary, syntax and grammar and deploy it to be able to translate accurately simple Greek sentences and passages into English.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the CAS foreign language requirement
    • May be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • GREK 102 - Ancient Greek II
    • This course continues the study of the fundamentals of the ancient Greek language, including more vocabulary, grammar, syntax and more advanced readings. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate more advanced knowledge of ancient Greek vocabulary, syntax and grammar, and deploy it to be able to translate accurately more advanced Greek sentences and passages into English.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101 or its equivalent; GREK 101-102 or their equivalents are pre-requisite for all higher-level GREK courses
    • Fulfils requirements toward the CAS foreign language requirement
    • May be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • GREK 236 - Xenophon
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from the prose works of Xenophon, with special emphasis on review of ancient Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected prose passages in ancient Greek with accuracy, as well as demonstrate understanding of the content of the passages.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14 (Rome)
  • GREK 262 - Introduction to Plato
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from works of the philosopher Plato, with special emphasis on review of ancient Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected prose passages from Plato, as well as demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the content of the passages.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • GREK 267 - Introduction to New Testament Greek
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from the New Testament, with special emphasis on review of ancient Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected passages, as well as demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the content.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • attribute: Catholic Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • GREK 275 - Introduction to Greek Oratory
    • This course centers on translation of selections from Attic and other ancient Greek orators, with special emphasis on review of ancient Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected passages, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings, as well as rhetorical figure and constructs in them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • GREK 281 - Introduction to Greek Historiography
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from the historical works of ancient Greek authors, with special emphasis on review of ancient Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately ancient Greek historical prose passages, analyze and appreciate their style and contents, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their various contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 285 - Introduction to Greek Poetry
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from the poetic works of ancient Greek authors, with special emphases on review of Greek grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts and the basic style and structure of Greek poetry. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected passages in Greek poetry, comprehend, analyze and appreciate various poetic genres, as well as demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the content and artistry of the selected poetry.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 287 - Introduction to Christian Greek
    • This course focuses on the translation of selected passages from Christian Greek writers, such as Origen, Basil, and Gregory, with special emphasis on review of grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected readings, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 301 - Stylistics
    • This course involves study of the various styles of expression of ancient Greek prose, especially oratory, through investigation of selected prose passages. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the elements of ancient Greek prose style and facility in deploying them in composition.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 303 - Greek Composition
    • This course involves practical exercises to develop correct and fluent expression in written ancient Greek prose. Outcome: Students should be able to write ancient Greek in various styles, demonstrating facility in deploying fluent knowledge of vocabulary, syntax and grammar in the writing of ancient Greek prose.
    • pre-requisite: at least two GREK author-courses at the 200-level or 300-level
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 315 - The Greek Fathers
    • This course examines the writings of the early church fathers, including such as Athanasius, Basil and John (Chrysostom); it also comprises an introduction to the historical background of Eastern patristic thought. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, demonstrate knowledge in detail of the writings, their authors and their times, and appreciate more deeply the issues and concerns located in these writings.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Catholic Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 325 - Demosthenes
    • This course examines the works of the Attic orator Demosthenes, amid the political and historical context of later Classical Athens. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, demonstrate knowledge in detail of the genre, the author and his times, and understand and appreciate the ideas, issues and concerns expressed in the orations.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 331 - Herodotus
    • This course focuses on the Histories of Herodotus, the events about which he writes, and the various contexts in which his work was produced. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the Histories with proficiency, as well as demonstrate knowledge in detail of the work, its author, and its historical and political contexts and significances.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 335 - Thucydides
    • This course focuses on the History of the Peloponnesian War of Thucydides, the events about which he writes, and the various contexts in which his work was produced. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the History with proficiency, as well as demonstrate knowledge in detail of the work, its author, and its historical and political contexts and significances.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 341 - The Iliad
    • This course focuses on Homer's Iliad and the genre of ancient Greek epic poetry, in particular, on the characters of the heroes and their place within the context of Greek society and thought. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the Iliad with proficiency, and demonstrate detailed knowledge of the author, the poem, its contents and meanings, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of various contexts of the poem, its transmission, and the accomplishment of its composition.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 342 - The Odyssey
    • This course focuses on Homer's Odyssey and the genre of ancient Greek epic poetry, in particular, on the character of Odysseus and his place within the context of Greek society and thought. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the Odyssey with proficiency, and demonstrate detailed knowledge of the author, the poem, its contents and meanings, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of various contexts of the poem, its transmission, and the accomplishment of its composition.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 343 - Greek Lyric Poetry
    • The subject of this course is ancient Greek lyric poetry involving selections from such as Archilochus, Sappho, Alcaeus, and Anacreon. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency, demonstrate knowledge in detail about the authors, their poetry, and the various poetic styles they employed, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 351 - Aristophanes
    • This course focuses on the comedic poetry of Aristophanes, set against the backdrop of Athens in the late fifth century B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections of Aristophanes with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his comedies, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 353 - Aeschylus
    • This course focuses on selected tragedies of Aeschylus, set against the backdrop of Athens in the earlier fifth century B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections from Aeschylus with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his tragedies, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 354 - Sophocles
    • This course focuses on selected tragedies of Sophocles, set against the backdrop of Athens in the earlier fifth century B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections from Sophocles with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his tragedies, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 355 - Euripides
    • This course focuses on selected tragedies of Euripides, set against the backdrop of Athens in the earlier fifth century B.C.E. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections from Euripides with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his tragedies, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 360 - Theocritus
    • This course centers on the poetry of Theocritus of Syracuse, set against the background of Hellenistic Alexandria. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections from Theocritus with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author, his poetry, and the styles he employed, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 362 - Plato, Republic
    • This course centers on translation, evaluation and interpretation of selections from Plato's Republic. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his work, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the work's meaning and the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to it.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
  • GREK 388 - Readings in Greek Literature I
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Greek literature. (This is a special topics course in ancient Greek.) Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency and demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of them, their styles and possible interpretations.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp14 (Rome), F14
  • GREK 389 - Readings in Greek Literature II
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Greek literature. (This is a special topics course in ancient Greek.) Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency and demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of them, their styles and possible interpretations.
    • pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Greek; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Literature-Language stream
    • Greek culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15

Latin (LATN)

  • LATN 101 - Latin I
    • This course introduces students to elementary grammatical forms, basic syntax, and vocabulary of Latin, and simple readings in the language. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of Latin vocabulary, syntax and grammar and deploy it to be able to translate accurately simple Latin sentences and passages into English.
    • Fulfils requirements toward the CAS foreign language requirement
    • May be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • LATN 102 - Latin II
    • This course continues the study of the fundamentals of the Latin language, including more vocabulary, grammar, syntax and more advanced readings. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of basic Latin vocabulary, syntax and grammar and deploy it to be able to translate accurately more advanced Latin sentences and passages into English.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101 or its equivalent; LATN 101-101 or their equivalents are pre-requisite for all higher-level LATN courses
    • Fulfils requirements toward the CAS foreign language requirement
    • May be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • LATN 271 - Introduction to Reading Latin
    • This intermediate-level course centers on translation of prose and poetry of Roman authors, with special emphasis on review of Latin grammar as it is encountered in the selected texts. Outcomes: Students will be able to translate selected passages of Latin prose and poetry with accuracy, analyze and appreciate Roman literature, and demonstrate understanding of the content of the passages.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • LATN 281 - Introduction to Roman Historians
    • This course centers on translation of representative selections from the historical works of Republican, Augustan and other Latin authors. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately Latin historical prose passages, analyze and appreciate their style and contents, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their various contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 283 - The Age of Caesar
    • This course focuses on the literature and society of Rome at the time of Julius Caesar, in particular translation of selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Catullus, Sallust, Caesar and Cicero. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected readings, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • LATN 284 - The Age of Augustus
    • This course focuses on the literature and society of Rome at the time of Augustus. Selected readings are from such authors as Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Tibullus and Propertius. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected readings, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14
  • LATN 286 - The Age of Nero
    • This course focuses on the literature and society of Rome at the time of Nero. Selected readings are from such authors as Tacitus, Petronius, Seneca, and Lucan. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected readings, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: F14
  • LATN 287 - The Age of the Flavians
    • This course focuses on the literature and society of Rome at the time of the emperors Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. Selected readings are from such authors as Tacitus, Suetonius, Martial, and Juvenal. Outcome: Students should be able to translate accurately the selected readings, analyze and appreciate their style and content, and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of their contexts and meanings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • LATN 289 - Readings in Latin Literature
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Latin literature. (This is a special topics course in Latin.) Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of selected Latin literature, its style, and its possible interpretations.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 303 - Latin Composition
    • This course involves practical exercises to develop correct and fluent expression in written Latin prose. Outcome: Students should be able to write Latin in various styles, demonstrating facility in deploying fluent knowledge of vocabulary, syntax and grammar in the writing of Latin prose.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 314 - Cicero's Letters
    • This course examines the correspondence of Cicero, as well as the political, social, and intellectual context of Classical Rome. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, to demonstrate knowledge in detail of the genre of formal Latin correspondence, the author and his times, and to understand and appreciate the ideas, issues and concerns expressed in the letters.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: F15
  • LATN 315 - The Latin Fathers
    • This course examines the writings of the early church fathers, including such as Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine; it also comprises an introduction to the historical background of Western patristic thought. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, to demonstrate knowledge in detail of the writings, their authors and their times, and appreciate more deeply the issues and concerns located in these writings.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Catholic Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 317 - Pliny the Younger
    • This course examines the correspondence of the younger Pliny, as well as the political, social, and intellectual context of later Classical Rome and Roman customs in public and private life. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, to demonstrate knowledge in detail of the genre, the author and his times, and understand and appreciate the ideas, issues and concerns expressed in the letters.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 325 - The Orations of Cicero
    • This course centers on the public orations of Cicero, his methods of oratorical persuasion, and the judicial processes of late Republican Rome that form the context for these orations. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, to demonstrate knowledge in detail of the genre, the author and his times, understand and appreciate the ideas, issues and concerns expressed in the orations, and comprehend the historical and judicial background of the orations.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 328 - Quintilian
    • This course centers on Quintilian and his Institutio Oratoria, a comprehensive textbook of the technical aspects of ancient rhetoric. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, to demonstrate knowledge in detail of Latin rhetoric and oratory, and understand and appreciate Latin rhetorical styles, literary figures, and the structure and contents of Latin speeches.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 332 - Historical Masterworks I
    • This course examines the works of Livy or Sallust and their contexts in the later Republic and early Empire. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail of the author/s studied and the contents of the writings, as well appreciation for the genre of historical writing and for its significance within its political and intellectual context.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 335 - Historical Masterworks II
    • This course examines the works of Tacitus, Suetonius, or Latin historical writers of the later Roman Empire. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail of the author/s studied and the contents of the writings, as well appreciation for the genre of historical writing and for its significance within its political and intellectual context.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 341 - Vergil
    • This course focuses on Vergil's Aeneid and the genre of Latin epic poetry, in particular, on the character of Aeneas and his place within the context of Augustan Roman politics and society. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the Aeneid with proficiency, and demonstrate detailed knowledge of the author, the poem, and its contents and meanings, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of various contexts of the poem and Vergil's accomplishments in composing it.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 343 - Latin Verse
    • The subject of this course is Latin poetic verse, including selections from Catullus, Horace, Martial, Statius, and other Latin poets. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the works with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the authors, their poetry, and the various poetic styles they employed, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 344 - Roman Elegy
    • The subject of this course is Latin elegiac poetry, including selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. Outcome: Students should be able to translate Roman elegy with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the authors, their poetry, and Latin elegy, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 345 - Horace
    • This course focuses on selections of the odes, satires and epistles of Horace, set against the backdrop of late Republican and Augustan Rome. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selections of Horace with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author, his poetry, the various styles he used, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 346 - Juvenal
    • This course focuses on the satires of Juvenal, set against the backdrop of Flavian Age Rome and the Roman Empire. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the satires with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his satires, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Currently scheduled: Sp15
  • LATN 347 - Early Christian Poetry
    • This course centers on early Christian poets such as Ausonius, Prudentius, and Fortunatus, and their works. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the authors and their poems, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social, spiritual, and intellectual contexts of their works.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 351 - Roman Comedy
    • This course focuses on the genre of Roman comedy, including selected plays of Plautus and/or Terence. Outcome: Students should be able to translate selected texts in Roman comedy with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the authors and their comedies, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 360 - Lucretius
    • This course centers on translation and understanding of the De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the poetry of Lucretius with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his work, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to it.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 361 - St Augustine's Works
    • This course focuses on translation and understanding of the works of Saint Augustine. Outcome: Students should be able to translate these works with proficiency, and be able to demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his works, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social, and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Catholic Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 362 - Cicero's Philosophical Works
    • This course focuses on translation and understanding of the philosophical works of the orator Cicero, including, for example, De Amicitia. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the philosophical works of Cicero with proficiency, and be able to demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his works, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 364 - Seneca
    • This course focuses on translation and understanding of the works of the philosopher and playwright, Seneca. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works of Seneca with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about the author and his works, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Course attribute: Shakespeare Studies
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 373 - Workshop in Secondary School Latin
    • This course examines the objectives, standards, methods of presentation, testing, audiovisual aids, and desirable backgrounds for the teaching of Latin in secondary schools. This course is for prospective teachers of Latin and is taught in cooperation with Loyola's School of Education. Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of these objective and standards, etc., as well as be able to employ them effectively in classroom contexts.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 387 - Medieval Latin
    • This course focuses on readings in medieval Latin prose and poetry, as well as on comparison with classical Latin style and content. Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works of the course with proficiency, and demonstrate knowledge in detail about their authors, as well as deeper understanding and appreciation of the historical, social and intellectual contexts and influences pertaining to them.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
  • LATN 388 - Readings in Latin Literature
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Latin literature. (This is a special topics course in Latin.). Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency and demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of selected Latin literature, its style, and its possible interpretations.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14 (Rome)
  • LATN 389 - Readings in Latin Literature
    • Students study a selected range of masterworks in Latin literature. (This is a special topics course in Latin.). Outcome: Students should be able to translate the selected works with proficiency and demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding of selected Latin literature, its style, and its possible interpretations.
    • pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or their equivalents
    • Fulfils the CAS foreign language requirement
    • Fulfils requirements toward the major or minor in Latin; may be substituted for CLST credit-hours toward the major or minor in Classical Civilization
    • Fulfils requirements toward the Classics degree-distinction
    • Roman culture
    • Recently scheduled: Sp14

UCLR 100 (Literary Knowledge, Tier 1, also taught by English and by Modern Languages), CLST 101-102 (Classical Hebrew I & II, cross-listed with Theology), and CLST 131 do not count for any major of the Department (though Classical Hebrew could be used for the second language of the Classics degree-distinction).

Courses by disciplinary streams:   

Literature and Language StreamHistory, Society, and Culture StreamArt and Archaeology Stream
  • UCLR 100 (Literary Knowledge, Tier 1, also taught by English and by Modern Languages), CLST 101-102 (Classical Hebrew I & II, cross-listed with Theology), and CLST 131 (etymology) do not count for any major of the Department (though Classical Hebrew could be used for the second language of the Classics degree-distinction).
  • CLST 380 Research in Classical Studies, CLST 381 Directed Study, CLST 382 Intership in Classical Studies, and CLST 388/389 Classical Backgrounds I/II, and courses offered by other programs but appropriate by their predominantly Classical content for inclusion within a Classical Civilization, Greek, or Latin major or minor, flow in the streams according to the topics offered in particular instances.

Courses by disciplinary cultures:   

Greek CultureGreek and Roman Culture, or Variably Greek or Roman CultureRoman Culture

This page updated 18 May 2015 by lgawlinski@luc.edu