Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

MATHEMATICS PREPAREDNESS FOR CHEMISTRY

Students intending to register for a chemistry course will need a background in mathematics that is commensurate with the computational requirements of the chemistry course. Evidence of math preparedness is obtained from results of a Mathematics Diagnostic Test (MDT) administered by the College in conjunction with the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. Students who are found to be mathematically under prepared are required to pass the appropriate course or sequence of courses in mathematics with a grade of "C-" or better before they register for a chemistry course. More information regarding the MDT can be found at http://www.luc.edu/math/

Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Course Descriptions

101. General Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisite: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; or completion of Math 117 with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: 111. Lecture and discussion. The course deals with the development of basic chemical principles. Topics include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter, energetics and stoichiometry of reactions. For non chemistry majors and students in the B.A. Chemistry program.

102. General Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111, or 105 and completion of Math 118 or higher with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: 112. Lecture and discussion. This lecture and discussion course is a continuation of 101 and includes topics on equilibrium systems, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry.

105. Chemical Principles. (4)
Prerequisites: A satisfactory performance on the Loyola math proficiency test; successful completion of a year of high school chemistry or the equivalent, or completion of Math 117 with a grade of C- or better. A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for majors. Topics consist of stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry and kinetics. The laboratory experimentally illustrates the topics covered.

106. Basic Inorganic Chemistry. (4)
Prerequisite: 105 and completion of Math 118 or higher with a grade of C- or better. A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for majors that is a continuation of 105. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties, and the chemistry of the transition elements. Laboratory involves the techniques and procedures of inorganic synthesis and analysis.

111. General Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Co-requisite: 101. This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the lecture (101).

112. General Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Prerequisites: 101 and 111; or 105. Co-requisite: 102. This laboratory course experimentally illustrates the topics covered in the lecture (102).

151. Elementary Physiological Chemistry A. (4)
Prerequisite: high school chemistry or permission of chairperson. Lecture, quiz, and laboratory. Emphasis on the development of basic chemical properties and electron configuration, states of matter, gas laws, stoichiometry and energetics of reactions, aqueous equilibria, the use of radioisotopes in medicine, environmental considerations, and an introduction to structure and nomenclature in organic chemistry. Primarily for nursing students.

152. Elementary Physiological Chemistry B. (4)
Prerequisite: 151. Lecture, quiz and laboratory. Survey of organic chemistry including nomenclature and reactions of functional groups followed by a survey of biochemical topics including stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, digestion, metabolism, vitamins, hormones, and blood. Primarily for nursing students.

212. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. (3)
Prerequisites: college algebra; Chem 106 or 102 and 112.
Selected topics in quantitative analysis.

214. Elementary Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. (1)
Pre or Co-requisites: Chem 212.
Selected topics in quantitative analysis lab.

221. Organic Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisite: 106 (preferred), or 102 and 112. Lecture, discussion and laboratory. An intensive course for chemistry majors using a mechanistic approach. Topics include organic nomenclature, chemical and physical properties and reactions of several classes of aliphatic compounds, stereochemistry and introduction to spectroscopy.

222. Organic Chemistry II. (4)
Prerequisite: 221. Lecture, discussion and laboratory. Continuation of 221. Nomenclature, properties, reactions and syntheses of further classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, carbohydrates and other polyfunctional substances; spectroscopy.

223. Organic Chemistry A. (3)
Prerequisites: 102 and 112, or 106. Lecture and discussion. First semester of a two semester sequence for non-chemistry majors. A survey of topics including stereochemistry; spectroscopy; and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, properties and syntheses of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.

224. Organic Chemistry B. (3)
Prerequisite: 223 or equivalent. Lecture. Continuation of 223; for non-chemistry majors. Organic chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

225. Organic Chemistry Laboratory A. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 223. A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the topics correspondingly covered in 223. The experiments acquaint students with the laboratory practices and techniques of organic chemistry and several involve preparation of known organic compounds. For non-chemistry majors.

226. Organic Chemistry Laboratory B. (1)
Co- or prerequisite: 224. Prerequisite: 225. A laboratory course to experimentally illustrate certain topics covered in 224. The major portion of the laboratory work involves the identification of several relatively simple organic compounds. For non chemistry majors.

300. Undergraduate Research. (1, 2, or 3)
Prerequisites: prior consultation with the instructor and a completed agreement form. Directed study involving a contractual arrangement between student and instructor for accomplishing a defined research task. Agreement forms may be obtained from the department office, and the completed form (signed by the student, instructor, and chairperson) must be deposited in the chemistry department office before the student can register for this course.

301. Physical Chemistry I. (4)
Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or PHYS 112K and Math 263. Lecture and discussion. Mathematical and physical aspects of the behavior of chemical systems, classical and statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and the properties of matter.

302. Physical Chemistry II. (3)
Prerequisite: Chem 301. Co-requisite: 303. Lecture. A continuation of 301, including quantum mechanics, molecular structure, spectra, and group theory.

303. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1)
Co-requisite: 302. Laboratory course to experimentally illustrate the principles of physical chemistry and to acquaint the student with laboratory methods.

305. Physical Biochemistry for the Biological Sciences (3)
Prerequisites: Chem 222 or 224/226; Phys 112; Math 132 or equivalent. Lecture course covering principles and biological applications of thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and molecular spectroscopy. Restricted to Biochemistry and Forensics Majors.

306. Physical Biochemistry Laboratory. (1)
Prerequisites: Chem 305. This laboratory course will introduce apparatus, and analysis used in experimental physical chemistry for biochemistry students.

307. Inorganic Chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: Chem 222 or 224 and 226. Lecture course covering atomic structure, chemical bonding, and transition metal, solid state, organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors

310. Instrumental Analysis. (ESP 310) (2)
Prerequisites: 212, 214, 302. Co-requisite: 311. Lecture. Qualitative and quantitative instrumental analysis. Operational theory of instruments, atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy, electroanalysis, liquid and gas chromatography. This course is offered every other year.

311. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. (ESP 311) (2)
Co-requisite: 310. A laboratory course using selected experiments to illustrate the application of instrumental techniques to the solution of chemical problems. This course is offered every other year.

312. Environmental Chemistry. (ESP 312) (3)
Prerequisites: 106 and 106L or 102 and 112. Sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the environment-especially those that are considered to be pollutants are discussed. Current analytical techniques used for determinations of EPA listed priority pollutants. Mechanisms associated with the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, smog formation, acid rain phenomena, and analysis and disposal of hazardous waste are also presented. This course is offered every other year.

313. Environmental Chemistry Lab. (1)
Prerequisites: CHEM 106 & 106L or 102 & 112. Co-requisites: CHEM 312. A laboratory course to experimentally illustrate modern environmental analysis techniques. This course is offered every other year.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 302. Lecture only. Modern theories of atomic and molecular structure as applied to inorganic chemistry.

341. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (1)
Co-requisite: 340 or Instructor permission. A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the topics and techniques met in modern inorganic chemistry. This course is offered every other year.

361. Survey in Biochemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 222 or 224 and 226. Lecture. Structural-functional relationships of proteins, nucleic acids and cell membranes; and metabolic pathways.

362. Current Concepts in Bio-chemistry. (3)
Prerequisite: 361. Lecture. FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS ONLY Current concepts in biochemistry explained at a molecular level. For each topic covered in the course, an introductory lecture on basic information is given first. About six to ten selected topics are covered.

363. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2)
Prerequisite: 361. FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS ONLY A laboratory course designed to experimentally illustrate the principles of biochemistry. Restricted to Chemistry with Biochemistry Emphasis majors.

365. Proteomics. (3)
Prerequisite: 361. Proteomics describes and deciphers the protein structures that are the result of biocheical interactions encoded in a genome. To understand these processes, proteins have to be identified, sequenced, categorized, and classified with respect to their function and interaction in a protein network. This course will teach students how to characterize functional protein networks, examine their dynamic alteration during physiological and pathological processes. The course will also cover techniques to analyze and identify proteins using protein databases and study protein to protein interactions in the discover of drugs for diseases.

370. Biochemistry I. (3)
Prerequisites: Chem 222 or 224 and 226. Lecture. This is the first part of a two-semester Biochemistry series that emphasizes important biochemical concepts on the structure and function of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and cell membranes as well as on the bioenergetic and regulatory principles behind the central and carbohydrate pathways. This course is restricted to Biochemistry, Chemistry BS and Chemistry BA majors.

371. Biochemistry II. (3)
Prerequisites: Chem 370. Lecture. This is the second part of a two-semester Biochemistry lecture series that emphasizes important biochemical concepts on lipid, amino acid and nucleotide metabolic pathways as well as the structure and function of nucleic acids. Special topics on sensory systems, motility, immunology and drug development will also be discussed. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors.

372. Biochemistry Laboratory I. (2)
Prerequisites: Chem 370. This laboratory is designed to simulate a research experience and to teach basic techniques utilized in a biochemistry laboratory. The course theme involves a comparative investigation of the enzyme glyceraidehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from various animal sources. All procedures required in lab will be found by the student in the library and proposed to the instructor(s) as a pre-lab exercise. Each two-student team will be working on GAPDH from either an aquatic or land animal source, e.g., trout, tuna, port beef or chicken. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors.

373. Biochemistry Laboratory II. (2)
Prerequisites: Chem 371. This laboratory course is designed to simulate a research project in which molecular biology techniques and biochemistry are integrated. Those techniques are used as important tools to help solve questions in enzyme structure and function. The course theme involves an investigation on the relationship between protein structure and function of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) from Escherichia coli. All procedure required in lab will be found by the student in the library and proposed to the instructor(s) as a pre-lab exercise. Each two-student team will be working on a specific ADP-Glc PPase that has been previously obtained in a recombinant form. Their genes will be provided in a plasmid form. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors.

380. Chemistry Seminar. (1)
Prerequisite: 222 or 224 and 226. A weekly seminar course. The talks vary over the entire range of chemistry and are generally given by outside speakers.

385. Advanced Enzyme Kinetics and Mechanisms. (3)
Prerequisite: Chem 370. Lecture. The major theme in this course will be topics that are related to modern enzymology. Restricted to Biochemistry majors.

386. Metabolic Processes & Supermolecular Bio Structures. (3)
Prerequisite: Chem 371. Lecture. The emphasis will be on control of pathways and on supermolecular organization of metabolism. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors.

387. Plant Biochemistry
Prerequisite: Chem 370. Lecture. The major themes in this course will be about topics that are related to plant biochemistry and metabolism. The structure of the course will involve lectures for each topic, with discussion with the students. Students will learn how plants and photosynthetic organisms acquire and process energy. Plant metabolism will constitute a central part of the course, focusing on the main differences from other living organisms. A solid understanding of plant metabolism will inspire the student to think about all the possibilities that plant biochemistry and biotechnology offer to solve critical problems, such as malnutrition, global climate change, drug discovery, and infectious diseases. This course is restricted to Biochemistry majors.

395. Special Topics in Chemistry. (1-3)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory progress toward completion of the core of chemistry courses, and junior or senior status. Specific titles and contents vary from semester to semester.

Loyola

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Loyola University Chicago · 1032 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3100 · Fax: 773.508.3086

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