Catholicism and the Professional Life

Faith and Public Life: The Church in the Americas

Faith and Public Life Series [Fall 2015]

Thursday, 8 October 2015
3:30PM - 5:30PM
Piper Hall, Lake Shore Campus
Loyola University Chicago

This event is free and open to the public!

In 1999, Pope John Paul II issued a post-synodal apostolic exhortation entitled Ecclesia in America. The pope asked the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops to reflect “on America as a single entity, by reason of all that is common to the peoples of the continent, including their shared Christian identity and their genuine attempt to strengthen the bonds of solidarity and communion between the different forms of the continent’s rich cultural heritage.”

Loyola University Chicago will host a conversation following the visit of Pope Francis to Cuba and to the United States. Leading this conversation will be: Ambassador Carmen Lomellin, former U.S. ambassador to the Organization of American States, Dr. Miguel H. Díaz, former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, and Dr. Peter M. Sanchez, Associate Professor of Political Science. Among the questions that will be explored by this panel include: What influence did Vatican II and Medellín have on the American continent? What are some ongoing socio-political challenges facing the American continent? What can nations on this continent do to birth a New Spring in human relations? How might the normalization of diplomatic relations with Cuba, and the role that the Church has exercised in this process contribute to the stabilization of inter-continental relations? What positive role can Catholic faith leaders exercise within the continent, especially now under Pope Francis, the first Latin-American pope in history? Join us and add your own voices to this relevant conversation that explores the present and future of Church and society in our American continent.

Pope Francis' Moral Message: Care for the Earth, Care for the Poor, and Our Environmental Responsibility

Garanzini at Law School [Fall 2015]

Tuesday, 13 October 2015
12:00PM - 2:00PM
Ceremonial Courtroom, 10th floor
Corboy Law Center (25 E. Pearson Street)
Water Tower Campus, Loyola University Chicago

This event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is requested. To RSVP, please e-mail: Amcdani@luc.edu

Keynote Address

  • Rev. Michael J. Garanzini, S.J., Chancellor of Loyola University Chicago

Panel Discussion

  • Professor Steve Ramirez, Loyola University Chicago School of Law 
  • Professor Lucia Silecchia, Catholic University of America School of Law 
  • Mary Hallan Fiorito (JD ’93), Ethics and Public Policy Center
  • Alex Rangel (2L), Loyola University Chicago School of Law

Moderator

  • The Honorable Thomas M. Donnelly (Associate Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County)

Father Garanzini, along with a panel of scholars and students, will discuss Pope Francis's recent encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si. In this encyclical, the Pope challenges the whole human family to work together "to seek a sustainable and integral development."  Because the development envisioned is "integral" the discussion will involve not only environmental affairs, but economics, and the family, and how these dimensions of "our common home" are addressed in law.

Further information is available on the LUC's School of Law website.

Brochure for LUC Event - Pope Francis's Moral Message

Catholic Thought and the Professional Life: A Contemplative in Action: Is It Really Possible?

Catholic Thought and the Professional Life: A Contemplative in Action: Is It Really Possible?

Wednesday, 8 April 2015
3:00p.m.–6:00p.m.
Regents Hall, Lewis Towers
Water Tower Campus, LUC

This event is free and open to the public!

The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage will host a panel discussion on Loyola’s Water Tower Campus as part of its Catholic Thought and the Professional Life Series. This series, which takes place each spring semester, seeks to connect faculty from across Loyola’s Professional Schools in conversation about the role of Catholicism in their disciplines today.

This year’s panel—A Contemplative in Action: Is It Really Possible?—will feature guest speaker Mr. Mark Kennedy Shriver. Mr. Shriver's recent book, A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sargent Shriver (St. Martin's Griffin, 2012), looks back at the life of his father, Sargent Shriver, and the example he provides of a real-life contemplative in action. Not only did Sargent Shriver count among his professional accomplishments the founding of the Peace Corps and the invaluable contributions he made to President Johnson's War on Poverty, but his personal accomplishments of living a public life of faith, hope, and love—even while he struggled with Alzheimer's—speak to the question of what it means to be both a contemplative person—and a good person—in the world today.

In conversation with to Mr. Shriver, six members of Loyola’s faculty will participate in our panel discussion: Stacey Platt (School of Law); Clifford J. Shultz (Quinlan School of Business); Ann Marie Ryan (School of Education); Elizabeth Coffman (School of Communication); Dean Darrell Wheeler (School of Social Work); and Marian Diaz (Institute of Pastoral Studies).

Catholicism, Global Development and the Professional Life

Catholicism, Global Development and the Professional Life

The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage will host a panel discussion on Loyola’s Water Tower Campus as part of its Catholicism and the Professional Life series. This series, which takes place each spring semester, seeks to connect faculty from across Loyola’s Professional Schools in conversation about the role of Catholicism in their disciplines today.

This year’s panel—Catholicism, Global Development, and the Professional Life—explores the intersection of Catholicism, global development, and the professions through a shared engagement with economist and writer Robert Calderisi’s recent book Earthly Mission: The Catholic Church and World Development (Yale UP, 2013). In this book, Calderisi explores “the tensions and paradoxes within the Catholic Church” when it comes to global development—complicity with genocide in Rwanda and dictatorship in Argentina on the one hand, and the defense of human rights in Brazil and El Salvador on the other.

In addition to Mr. Calderisi, six members of Loyola’s faculty will participate in our panel discussion: John Breen (School of Law), Patricia Felkins (School of Communication), Maria de Haymes (School of Social Work), Lee Hubbell (School of Education), Tassos Malliaris (School of Business), and Brian Schmisek (Institute of Pastoral Studies). Please join us in what promises to be both a stimulating and timely conversation.

Pacem in Terris and the Professional Life

Pacem in Terris and the Professional Life

This panel discussion will focus on the papal encyclical Pacem in terris, issued by Pope John XXIII in 1963. It was the first encyclical addressed not only to the Catholic faithful but also to all people of good will. It urged respect for human rights, the establishment of equality among nations, and emphasized the individual's moral duties in creating a peaceful and just global community.

The panel will summarize and contextualize the importance of the document for the church and the world in the light of the signs of the times. Prominent scholars from Loyola University Chicago will offer their reactions to the document, discuss how the document intersects with the aims of their professions and how they engage curriculum that highlights peace and social justice in their vocations.

Participants:

Presentation by Dr. Robert A. Ludwig
Institute of Pastoral Studies, Loyola University Chicago

Panelists:

Dr. Kathleen Getz
Dean, Quinlan School of Business, Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Noah Sobe
School of Education, Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Julia Pryce
School of Social Work, Loyola University Chicago

Hon. Thomas More Donnelly
Associate Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County, adjunct professor at Loyola Law School

Dr. Julia Lieblich
School of Communication, Loyola University Chicago

Moderator:

Fr. Mark Bosco, S.J.
Director, The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage



Past Events

Frederic Siedenburg, S.J.: The Journey of a Social Activist
Thursday, October 4, 1:00p.m.–3:00p.m.

This intercampus conversation features the published work of Dr. Edward Gumz, associate professor in the School of Social Work, LUC.  His work is a study of Frederic Siedenburg, S.J., the founder of the first Catholic-Jesuit School of Social Work in the United States at Loyola University Chicago in 1914. It examines the multi-faceted career of this sociologist and educator who espoused both Progressive and New Deal ideas within a Catholic context. Lewis Towers, Room 1202, Water Tower Campus, LUC. By invitation and faculty request. Click here to access the article

Disability and Miraculous Cures in the Middle Ages
Tuesday, September 27, 3:30p.m.–5:00p.m.

Research discussion lead by Dr. Edward Wheatley, Department of English, Loyola University Chicago. Crown Center 116, Lake Shore Campus, Loyola University Chicago.  By invitation and faculty request.

Sleep for Soul and Body:
Ancient and Contemporary Perspectives

Thursday, February 24, 2:30p.m.–3:45p.m.
Tri-campus research discussion led by Dr. Leslie Dossey, Department of History, Loyola University Chicago. Loyola Medical Center, Sleep Clinic. By invitation and faculty request. For further information contact CCIH at 773.508.3820.

Prayer, Marriage, and the Family
Thursday, October 21st, 2010, 12:00p.m.–1:15p.m.
Research discussion led by Dr. Paul Giblin, Institute of Pastoral Studies, Loyola University Chicago. Lewis Towers 631, Conference Room, Loyola University Chicago, Water Tower Campus.