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Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Fall 2012 Courses

 

Interpreting Literature (UCLR 100)

Section: 01E #6027
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 AM – 9:05 AM LSC

Section: 02E #6028
Instructor:  T. Boyle
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 AM – 10:10 AM LSC

Section: 03E #6029
Instructor:  M. Bradshaw
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 AM – 10:10 AM LSC

Section: 04E #6030
Instructor:  M. DeLancey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

This is an introductory course about how and why one reads works of literature. Readings for the course will cut across a variety of genres—poetry, drama, prose—and embrace a number of historical periods.  The reading list will include (tentatively) texts by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Joseph Conrad, John Donne, William Shakespeare, John Milton, Robert Frost, and Ernest Hemingway.

Section: 05E #6031
Instructor:  V. Foster
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

In this course we will read and discuss plays, poems, and works of fiction and ask ourselves how they work and what they are for.  The plays will be Glaspell’s Trifles, Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, and Beckett’s Waiting for Godot.  We will augment  discussion  of the plays with video clips and in-class performance.  We will study poetic forms such as the sonnet (including Shakespeare’s and Wordsworth’s) and the ballad (from the middle ages to Gwendolyn Brooks).  Finally we will read Emily Brontë’s wild, romantic novel, Wuthering Heights, and several of Angela Carter’s modern retellings of fairy tales from The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories.  Requirements:  three short essays, three exams, class participation. 

Section: 06E #6032
Instructor:  S. Weller
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 PM – 2:30 PM LSC

Section: 07E #6033
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

Section: 08E #6034
Instructor:  J. Glover
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

The foundational course in literary studies will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study. What is literature? Why does it matter? How has it been conceived in different times and places? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, and reader or audience? What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in the light of our own contemporary time? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect – and reflect on – questions of value and the diversity of human experience?  Exploring these questions will help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

Section: 62E #6035
Instructor: J. Janangelo
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM LSC

In our course, we will cover a range of literary theories (including Marxist and Psychoanalytic approaches) and apply them to selected literary texts. You will gain practice in literary analysis and critical writing. There will be papers and exams based on our course texts and class discussions.

Business Writing (ENGL 210)

Section: 20W #2739
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25AM – 11:15AM WTC

Section: 21W #2740
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30AM – 3:45PM WTC

Section: 61W #2741
Instructor:  J. Janangelo
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 PM – 9:30PM WTC

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience in reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group class presentation.

ENGL 210.61W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 62W #5484
Instructor:  J. Janangelo
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 PM – 9:30PM WTC

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience in reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group class presentation.

ENGL 210.62W is a writing intensive class.

U.S. Experience (HONR) (ENGL 203)

Section: 01H #3445
Instructor:  M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15PM LSC

Section: 02H #3445
Instructor:  M. Bosco
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15PM LSC

Encountering Asia (HONR) (ENGL 209)

Section: 01H #3728
Instructor:  H. Mann
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 PM – 12:45PM LSC

Writing Center Tutor Practicum (ENGL 220)

Section: 60WH #4067
Instructor:  M. Meinhardt
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 PM – 9:30PM LSC

Our seminar-style class examines the dynamic literature, history, and evolution of the writing center community as a foundation for developing independent skills as a writing center tutor. The course emphasizes the active civic engagement, community-building, collaborative learning, and writing pedagogy that students will apply as writing tutors in the Loyola University Chicago Writing Center. All students tutor as a part of the course, and are expected to continue supporting the community once the class is completed. Students will develop a collaborative project, an article for submission to a field journal, tutoring assessment strategies, and a series of literary/research based critical reactions. The course requires Instructor Consent, and merits credit for the Civic Engagement & Leadership Core, Writing Intensive status, and Service-Learning status.

Exploring Poetry (ENGL 271)

Section: 105 #3014
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 AM – 10:10 AM LSC

Section: 02W #3194
Instructor: H. Cramond
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

Section: 03W #3195
Instructor:  J. Jacobs
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

Section: 069 #3196
Instructor:  M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

Section: 070 #4675
Instructor:  J. Kolkey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM LSC

This course will provide an introduction to the basic elements of poetry, while focusing on works of the British Romantic Period and American Beat Generation. Selections from these two “movements” will give a sense of the formal range of poetic expression, while revealing significant thematic and ideological connections. We will discuss the techniques and vocabulary involved in analytically reading poetry, and consider the form's  position in artistic and political discourses and means of transmission in each period. Readings will include works by William Blake, Charlotte Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, Allen Ginsberg, and Gary Snyder, among others. Course requirements will consist of two short papers, a presentation, and quizzes.

Section: 04W #3584
Instructor:  C. Kendrick
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

The course will consist mainly in readings from a few British and American poets, Wordsworth and after. We will try to get to know the poets. Class discussion will generally deal with the form and sense of individual poems; about how one gets to know a poet; and about how one fixes on contexts in which to read poets and poems. 3 papers, 4 short exams, a midterm, and a final.

Section: 071 #5461
Instructor:  J. Cragwall
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

Why should we care about poetry – and how should we care about it?  And why do the answers to these two questions seem so similar?  We’ll start historically – who before us cared about poetry, and why?  We’ll study the pressure poems put on their historical moment, and how they’re shaped by it in surprising ways: for example, our discussion of Shakespeare will start with the formation of “Shakespeare” as a figure, often at odds with the “evidence” of the poems, of canonical standards throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a program that affected even the spelling of his poems.  Most of the authors in our anthology were white, male, and rich – how has literature been used to promote a series of questions and assumptions that they may have shared (sometimes called “the canon”), and how has it, even in these same authors, blown apart all the stereotypes and orthodoxies we’d expect to find?  We’ll watch the invention not only of English (and then British) culture, but of the English language itself, its twists and triumphs, detours and degenerations – and most importantly, we’ll watch as language, especially literary language, is fashioned into the greatest vehicle of social (as well as aesthetic) contest.  Papers, exams, unlicensed dentistry.

Exploring Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 05W #3585
Instructor:  T. Boyle
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 AM – 11:15 PM LSC

This course of studies will include texts that actively critique the importance of religion on the creative imagination, in particular Catholicism. The quest for meaning, whether religious or secular, can lead to some interesting works of drama. Modernist theater, for instance, with its quest for newness, has sought to dramatize the problems associated with religious faith (Samuel Beckett's Waiting For Godot). While the depictions can sometimes be sympathetic, sometimes skeptical, there is an underlying affirmation, and legitimization of the immense influence religion has had on forming our understanding of life. In this class we will also explore the movement away from the classical form of drama towards what Brecht calls 'epic theatre'.

Section: 071 #2350
Instructor:  D. Wallace
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM LSC

Section: 072 #3281
Instructor:  M. Owen
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

Exploring Fiction (ENGL 273)

Section: 06W #3015
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

Section: 073 #3587
Instructor:  S. Eilefson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

Once known as the “war to end war,” World War I is often cited as the dividing point from the traditions of the 19th century to those of the modern world. We will examine this contention, and its relationship to fiction, through short stories and novels of the modernist era, with special attention to works about World War I. We will address how literature “works,” i.e., its form and structure, genre, themes, voice, characterization, point of view, purpose and bibliographic codes. We will also learn to contextualize fiction in its particular political, ethical, social and technological era. Two short (4 pp) papers, one long (7-8 pp) final paper, which will have a small research component, a midterm and a final.

Section: 074 #3588
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

Section: 075 #3197
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM LSC

Section: 076 #3586
Instructor:  S. O’Brien
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 PM – 12:45 PM LSC

This course explores how narratives are constructed and mediated and how they influence us—with or without our knowledge or consent. Narrative fiction permeates our lives in a staggering variety of forms experienced live, in print, and on screens of all kinds. Through comparison of ‘old media’ and ‘new media’ narratives, we will investigate the literary, political, ethical, social, and technological dimensions of texts, such as war stories told in print, film, and video games; relationship stories told through stage and interactive dramas; and political fiction in novels and on Twitter. These comparisons will highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and cultural uses of media formats and put traditional narrative theory to the test. Analyzing narrative fictions by reading, viewing, playing, discussing, reading about, and writing about them, we will become more aware, articulate, and purposeful in our daily engagements with fictional and non-fictional narratives. Requirements include consistent participation, a short paper (4pp), a long paper (8pp), a discussion lead, a midterm, and a final.

Exploring Shakespeare (ENGL 274)

Section: 07W #3591
Instructor:  J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

In this course we will study eight of Shakespeare's plays, including plays from a variety of genres--comedy, history, tragedy, romance--and from various stages of his career as a playwright. We will consider the plays in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare's own development as a playwright. We will also explore ways in which the plays allow for a variety of interpretations and kinds of performance, and consider various critical approaches. Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class. Requirements will include papers, response papers, a midterm, and a final. 

Please note: English majors should take English 326, not English 274.

Section: 08W #3590
Instructor:  J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 PM – 2:30 PM LSC

In this course we will study eight of Shakespeare's plays, including plays from a variety of genres--comedy, history, tragedy, romance--and from various stages of his career as a playwright. We will consider the plays in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare's own development as a playwright. We will also explore ways in which the plays allow for a variety of interpretations and kinds of performance, and consider various critical approaches. Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class. Requirements will include papers, response papers, a midterm, and a final. 

Please note: English majors should take English 326, not English

Section: 09W #3592
Instructor:  V. Strain
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 PM – 12:45 PM LSC

This course refines students' close reading and critical thinking skills through an intense engagement with a range of Shakespeare's drama-his comedies, histories, tragedies, and later "romances." We will examine Shakespeare's language use and plots in the context of the early modern commercial theater (its material conditions and literary trends) and the poetic and rhetorical traditions disseminated through Elizabethan grammar schools. The plays selected are also indicative of the writer's ongoing concern with the social functions, as well as the individual's internalization, of the justice system's language and processes (including trials and the evaluation of evidence, for example). Speaking directly to his own time in its own terms, Shakespeare raised perennial questions related to the use and abuse of law and power. Regular writing assignments and group discussions require students to stay on top of the reading.

Chief American Writers I (ENGL 277)

Section: 077 #3593
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

Chief American Writers II 1865-Present (ENGL 278)

Section: 064 #3464
Instructor:  C. Wachal
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 PM – 9:05 PM LSC

African-American Literature (ENGL 282)

Section: 10W #4686
Instructor:  B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

This course serves as an introduction to the African American literary tradition. In addition to reading and interpreting works by prominent African-American writers from the era of slavery to the contemporary present, we will also discuss the major shifts and movements that have constituted the black literary tradition, like the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the Post-Soul era. We will consider representative works by African American novelists, poets, and essayists and consider the various ways they respond to dominant artistic conventions of their respective periods. Some questions we will consider are: What is African American literature? What are some major themes and concerns that have defined African-American literature? And, where does the future of African-American literature seem to point? Requirements for this course include regular attendance, two short essays, weekly writing assignments, a mid-term and a final exam. This course is writing-intensive and fulfills the multicultural and post-1900 literature requirements.

Section: 11W #2971
Instructor:  B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 AM – 1:25 PM LSC

(See above.)

Women in Literature (ENGL 283)

Section: 101 #
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

Section: 12W #4097
Instructor:  M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 PM – 1:25 PM LSC

This course will focus on influential writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a woman's intellectual tradition. We will read poets ranging from Stevie Smith to Phyllis Wheatley; fiction writers ranging from Flannery O'Connor to Elizabeth Gaskell; and essayists ranging from Virginia Woolf to Mary Wollstonecraft. Our textbook will be The Norton Anthology of Literature in English by Women.

As “writing intensive,” this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer. Assignments include reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a mid-term essay examination, a final examination, and one critical paper, to be written in stages with draft submissions.  ENGL 283-12W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 13W #2353
Instructor:  M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

This course will focus on influential writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a woman's intellectual tradition. We will read poets ranging from Stevie Smith to Phyllis Wheatley; fiction writers ranging from Flannery O'Connor to Elizabeth Gaskell; and essayists ranging from Virginia Woolf to Mary Wollstonecraft. Our textbook will be The Norton Anthology of Literature in English by Women.

As “writing intensive,” this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer. Assignments include reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a mid-term essay examination, a final examination, and one critical paper, to be written in stages with draft submissions.  ENGL 283-13W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 078 #4700
Instructor:  V. Bolf
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 AM – 9:45 AM LSC

Section: 15W #2590
Instructor:  B. Bouson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

“If women have learned many of the ways they interpret their lives from the narrative schemata of novels and stories,” writes Joanne Fry, “they can also gain from fiction new insights into the narrative processes of constructing meaning.”  Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core.  Focusing on literature written by 20th-  and 21st-century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts. Analyzing representative works of fiction written by women authors, this course will investigate the important cultural and gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, the female body, romantic love, mother-child relationships, and female friendship in their works.  The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, and Toni Morrison.  There will be oral presentations, papers, a midterm and a final exam.

Section: 14W #3201
Instructor:  S. Bost
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

In this course, we will analyze women’s relationship to the idea of “home” in a cross-cultural context, reading novels by nineteenth- and twentieth-century American women writers through the lenses of race, class, culture, and migration to explore the different meanings of home, house, housework, and homeland that emerge from these texts.  Class discussion will address how these different meanings of home relate to our own perceptions and our own homes, and students will write about “home” as a material and symbolic agent in the construction of women’s literature and women’s lives.  Readings will include Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, Edith Wharton’s Summer, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping, Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street, Judith Ortiz Cofer’s Silent Dancing, and excerpts from Nancy Mairs’s Remembering the Bone House.  Assignments will include regular exercises, a course presentation, three papers, and one revision. 

NOTE:  The section listed is cross-listed with WSGS 283-080.

Religion and Literature (ENGL 287)

Section: 16W #4704
Instructor: M. Bosco
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

Nature in Literature (ENGL 288)

Section: 079 #3204
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 AM – 9:05 PM LSC

Human Values in Literature (ENGL 290)

Section: 080 #2358
Instructor: R. Peters
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 AM – 9:05 PM LSC

In 1924, Maxwell Garnett, Secretary for the League of Nations wrote: "In the last hundred years the world has changed far more quickly and completely than in many preceding centuries [...] First the telegraph, then the telephone, and finally the discovery of wireless have brought the remotest parts of the earth closer and closer together. The developments of science are welding the world into a whole, whether its people wish it or not." Though he was unfamiliar with the term, Garnett describes an early moment of what we today call Globalization: The intersection of peoples and commodities across diverse geographies and cultures. In this course, we will investigate the effects of globalization from the start of the Twentieth Century to the present day. Specifically, we will look to borders -- national, political, ethnic and cultural -- and how political and violent conflicts often coalesce around these borders. We will explore the values at stake in these conflicts and in any possible resolutions. We will use literature and film from Juan Rulfo, Salman Rushdie, Cormac McCarthy, Kiran Desai and Zadie Smith, among several others. Course assignments will likely include short response papers, a discussion lead, and two longer papers.

Section: 081 #3206
Instructor: J. Frey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

We often think of literature as a vehicle for expressing emotions, but this impulse can lead us into the territory of reading literature as a reflection of ourselves and our own experiences. What happens, then, when we historicize emotions and examine emotive expression in literature in order to ask how these emotions might not resemble our own? Literature from earlier periods often reveals rubrics for emotions and emotional expression that are vastly different from what is culturally recognizable to us; these rubrics are informed by, for example, medical understandings of the human body or political and social expectations which change over time and differ between cultures. Approaching literary texts with this principle of selection allows us to reconsider our own experiences as well as our assumptions about human universals. Additionally, we will explore how literature can be a particularly apt venue for contending with such questions and issues. In this course, we will primarily read Medieval and Early Modern literature (from the 9th to the 16th century) in order both to explore such questions about emotions and to develop an understanding of and appreciation for literatures of past cultural worldviews. Readings will include Anglo-Saxon poetry (in translation), works by Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, John Milton and some later texts. The course requirements will include one short paper (4-6 pages) and one long paper (10-15 pages) as well as a midterm, final, and the expectation that students participate in class discussion.

Section: 17W #4716
Instructor: M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

Human beings are social creatures. While some individuals avoid the company of others or prefer to live in small family groups, recorded history indicates that people prefer to form clusters of varying sizes, ranging from tribes and clans to tribes, towns, and cities.  Despite the obvious advantages of aggregate living for purposes of defense, economic specialization, to say nothing of greater efficiency in hunting, gathering, agriculture, child-care, and crafts, human history also records persistent conflict both between and within societies.  Indeed, conflict is so prevalent in the human record that one might conclude that human beings, gregarious though they may be, also have an innate capacity for finding enemies outside as well as within their own social groupings. During such conflicts, the values that those very same societies have developed and cherish are often tested: they can be ignored or violated, but they can also be active and empowering.

These two sections of English 290 will approach the topic of the course through literature, both fiction and non-fiction, rather than through social science.  The literary works we will read and discuss—short stories, novels, plays, and memoirs—offer a variety of perspectives on what happens to human values in times of social conflict.  Sometimes the perspective is that of an individual or family caught in the maelstrom of intra- or inter-societal violence.  Sometimes the violence is entirely or largely below the surface and may not erupt into open adversarial confrontation. In each situation the conflict and the fate of human values are of course different, complicated by a host of historical and political circumstances.  Assigned readings will explore conflicts and values in various periods and in various parts of the world.  

We will probably start with a short story by Isaac Bashevis Singer, “The Story of My Dovecote,” which presents itself as the eye-witness account of a pogrom, that is, an anti-Jewish riot, in Eastern Europe. The list will include a novel by James Welch, Fools Crow, which imagines how Native Americans responded to threats to their civilization represented by the intrusion of European Americans and a play by Athol Fugard, Master Harold and the Boys, which is set in South African during the time of apartheid, or strict racial segregation. We will also read Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, his account of his years in a Nazi concentration camp, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, set in 19th century tribal Nigeria, Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which explores issues of slavery and racism in 19th-Century America, and Palestine’s Children, a collection of short stories by Gasson Kanafani, a Palestinian writer, which explore the current conflict in the Middle East.  Social conflict in Northern Ireland is addressed in Hope, a play by Terry Boyle.

There will be three papers, some revision work, a midterm and a final exam, and the possibility of occasional short quizzes and various writing exercises and activities in and out of class, inasmuch as these sections are designated Writing Intensive.

Section: 18W #3594
Instructor: M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

(See above.)

Section: 623#
Instructor: J. Hovey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00PM – 9:30 PM LSC

Grammar: Principals & Pedagogy (ENGL 303)

Section: 602 #3596
Instructor: C. Fitzgerald
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

The goal of this course is to explore English grammar not only as a list of rules and regulations that govern linguistic behavior but also as a means for students to more clearly convey their ideas in speech and writing.  The rules of English grammar are not as strict as they once were, but there is still a noticeable difference between standard and substandard English.  The ability to discern this difference can improve the image one projects as well as one’s career advancement. This course will examine all elements of English grammar from parts of speech and how they function in a sentence to proper punctuation and how it enhances clear and precise prose.  While studying proper usage, students will discover that words commonly used in one context may not be appropriate in another. This course will also promote an appreciation for the English language and investigate techniques for utilizing language effectively in speech and writing. This course is required for students planning to teach high school English, but it is also open to others. 

Studies in Women Writers (ENGL 306)

Section: 082 #4718
Instructor: B. Bouson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 306 will focus on literature written by twentieth- and twenty-first-century women authors. This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s writings and to understand the ways in which women novelists use fiction to challenge inherited cultural and literary assumptions; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; and to help them become familiar with the application of feminist theory to works by women authors.  In English 306, the instructor will provide necessary background information on the works covered and will model how to perform close readings of literary texts as she guides students in the investigation of the structures and strategies of representative works of women-authored fiction. The instructor will also place emphasis on the gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read in the course, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, coming to age, the female body, romantic love, mother-child relationships, and female friendships in their works.  The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, and Nancy Mairs.  There will be oral presentations, papers, a midterm and a final exam.

This course fulfills the post-1900 period requirement of the English major.

Feminism & Gender Topics (ENGL 307)

Section: 083 #5466
Instructor: P. Caughie
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00PM – 2:15 PM LSC

South Asian Literature in English (ENGL 315)

Section: 084 #5468
Instructor: H. Mann
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

This course examines literatures in English from South Asia and the South Asian diaspora.  Whereas the beginnings of writing in English on the Indian subcontinent date back to the mid-nineteenth century, it was the anti-colonial movement in the early- to mid-twentieth century that saw this literature come into its own; and it is the postcolonial and diasporic experiences of South Asians that have underwritten much of its excellence since then.  Focusing primarily on the issues of modern-day colonization, independence and partition, decolonization, and globalization as depicted in South Asian literatures in English, therefore, this course also investigates the representation of multiple nationalities, ethnicities, classes and castes, religions, linguistic traditions, gender and sexuality, and migration in the writings.  In addition, the course assesses the role of the English language and the authors' locations and target audiences in determining the reception of the literatures both at home and abroad; and it analyzes the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focalization, and characterization among others.  Finally, the course addresses the disciplinary and pedagogical practices underwriting the study of South Asian literatures in English in the western academy.  Readings will be drawn from various literary genres as well as critical and theoretical works written by authors from India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, and resident in India, USA, UK, and Canada.  

Please note that this course meets the multicultural and post-1900 period requirements of the English major.

The Writing of Poetry (ENGL 317)

Section: 085 #2360
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC

Section: 086 #2362
Instructor: V. Anderson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

English 317 is an introductory course in poetry writing. It is designed to provide practice and instruction in the art and craft of poetry. Specifically, the course will familiarize you with the elements of language, the complexities of form, the feel of the line, the image, and the play of sound in poetry. Through a close study of selected poems, the course will also familiarize you with the pluralism and eclecticism that marks contemporary American poetry.

Section: 087 #5202
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC

The Writing of Fiction (ENGL 318)

Section: 088 #2363
Instructor: D. Kaplan
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction through (a) reading master writers; (b) writing three original short stories; and (c ) having these stories discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by fellow students in a supportive, workshop environment.  Class participation is emphasized.

Section: 089 #4719
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC

Section: 603 #2506
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

Creative Nonfiction (ENGL 319)

Section: 090 #4720
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC

English Literature: Medieval Period (ENGL 320)

Section: 091 #4721
Instructor: E. Wheatley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

This course will examine romances and related literature on medieval England in which writers deploy supernatural forces or characters. We will analyze these texts in their social and historical contexts in order to elucidate what the supernatural might have meant to medieval readers. Readings will include the Lais of Marie de France, some of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and anonymous romances in verse. Although some readings will be in modern English translations, others will be in the original Middle English, which students will learn to pronounce. The final grade will be based on class participation, weekly reading responses, an oral report and a related research paper, two essays, and a final exam.

English Literature: Medieval Period (ENGL 325)

Section: 092 #2364
Instructor: C. Kendrick
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM LSC

The course is a literary survey of the "long" English Renaissance (c. 1516 - 1660), with an emphasis on poetry. Special attention will be paid to questions of genre; to changing notions of authorship and publication; to representations of gender and social status and class; and to religious struggle and change. Two papers, a midterm, and a final.

Plays of Shakespeare (ENGL 326)

Section: 093 #2365
Instructor: V. Strain
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM LSC

This course refines students' close reading and critical thinking skills through an intense engagement with a range of Shakespeare's plays-his comedies, histories, tragedies, and later "romances." We will examine Shakespeare's language use and dramaturgy in the context of the early modern commercial theater (its material conditions and literary trends) and the poetic and rhetorical traditions disseminated through Elizabethan grammar schools. We will also consider Shakespeare's status as an icon of English-speaking culture and as the poster-boy for the arts. To what extent does Shakespeare's reputation rest on his texts and on posthumous performance, critical, pedagogical, and political traditions? While we will begin the course by focusing on the historical circumstances surrounding the composition of Shakespeare's plays, we will end with a creative assignment that asks students to investigate the value of his works for present culture. Regular assignments and group discussions require students to stay on top of the reading, while the final assignment asks students to engage in intellectual risk-taking outside the classroom.

Section: 094 #2366
Instructor: J. Knapp
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

This course will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays in all the major genres (comedy, history, tragedy, and romance).  We will read the plays through a variety of critical approaches, taking into account the historical context in which they were produced.  Throughout the course of the semester we will focus on the development of drama in England, the material history of the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage, and the political and cultural place of the theater in Shakespeare’s England.  Plays may include: Much Ado About Nothing, Merchant of Venice, Richard II, 1 Henry IV, King Lear, Othello, and The Winter’s Tale. The primary text will be The Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edition.  There will be papers, a midterm and a final.

Studies in the Romantic Period (ENGL 338)

Section: 095 #4729
Instructor: S. Jones
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

The British Romantic period in literary history, ca. 1789-1832, was also the great age of the graphical satire, an era that has been called “the efflorescence of caricature.” In this class we’ll read Romantic poetry by Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, Moore, Barbauld, and others, but we’ll also learn to “read” cartoons from the period by artists such as James Gillray and George Cruikshank, interpreting them as visual and verbal representations of the age of George III and George IV, the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars, the Reform movement and its suppression, and the Queen Caroline Affair. The poetry and the graphical prints share topics, but they also share a “language” of images, an iconography, as well as certain satiric styles and representational approaches. The cartoons, which were extremely popular, often shed light on the aims and rhetorical strategies of Romantic poetry. One goal of the course will be to place Romantic poetry in the context of this popular “new media” of its day. Another goal will be to learn how prints were made and distributed and received--and what prints can tell us about print culture and history in nineteenth-century Britain. We’ll study digital reproductions as well as paper primary sources in the Thomas J. Michalak Collection in Loyola’s library, and this interdisciplinary class will combine elements of literary studies, history, art history, and media studies, all in the context of the important set of practices known as the digital humanities. Requirements will include regular presentations and an image-and-text research project using primary materials in University Archives. Watch Jones’ website for the complete syllabus and course materials when they become available: http://stevenejones.org. (This course meets the English department’s 1700-1900 period requirement.)

Victorian Literature (ENGL 340)

Section: 096 #2367
Instructor: M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM LSC

The primary aim of this course is the understanding and appreciation of Victorian literature, i.e., English literature written between 1837 and 1900.  In this course, students will improve their analytic, interpretive, and writing skills, and will learn what to look for in the way of attitude, as well as technique, in Victorian literature.  Readings and lectures on the cultural, philosophical, and religious milieu of the period will help to make the readings more accessible.  Assignments will include brief ungraded reflection papers, a mid-term examination, a critical paper, and a final examination.  Our texts will be The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th Edition, Volume E: The Victorian Age, and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights.     

Studies in Modernism (ENGL 344)

Section: 097 #5469
Instructor: J. Wexler
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

Definitions of modernism are hotly debated because the term has acquired so much prestige. Yet authors usually associated with the term are so distinctive that they do not suggest a common set of characteristics. We will read a selection of canonical texts from the first half of the twentieth century to test various definitions of modernism: poems by Hardy, Yeats, Owen, and Auden, as well as Heart of Darkness, Women in Love, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, The Waste Land, and Mrs. Dalloway.

Contemporary Critical Theory (ENGL 354)

Section: 098 #2368
Instructor: S. Bost
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM LSC

This course, which is required of all English majors, introduces students to critical terminology and to issues in contemporary criticism and theory.  Readings may include critical works that have informed and established formalist, feminist, psychoanalytic, and Marxist approaches to literary analysis, as well as those associated with gender studies, cultural studies, postcolonialism, and deconstruction.  Students will learn to apply a variety of critical theories through class discussion, regular exercises, brief papers, and two exams.  Readings will be drawn from three required texts, Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies (ed. Robert Dale Parker), How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies (Robert Dale Parker), and the Bedford Critical Edition of The Awakening (Kate Chopin). 

Section: 099 #3448
Instructor: P. Jay
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM LSC

This course introduces students to a range of contemporary theories about literature, literary criticism, and cultural studies. We will explore recent innovations in how we think about texts, authorship, narration, writing, and reading, review a variety of approaches to critical analysis and interpretation, and consider the social, cultural, and political dimensions of critical theory and literary analysis. Required texts for this course include Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, by Jonathan Culler, Critical Terms for Literary Study (ed. Lentricchia and McLaughlin), a novel, and some poems and short stories. Requirements include 2 shorter critical essays, regular quizzes, and a final longer paper.

 

High and Low Culture (ENGL 359)

Section: 100 #5470
Instructor: J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 PM – 1:25 PM LSC

This course, which may count as part of the Cultural Studies concentration, examines the construction and definition of high and low culture and their connections  in relation to the Early Modern or Renaissance period.  Through readings in various literary genres (poems, ballads, plays, prose fiction), as well as in material not traditionally considered literary, we will take up such questions as: how "high" and "low" culture, or elite and popular culture, have been defined and separated; how canonical texts incorporate elements of popular culture; what functions literature performed within Renaissance culture; and why texts of various kinds have been excluded from the literary canon.  Requirements will include papers and a final exam.

This section of this course fulfills the pre-1700 requirement for the English major.

American Literature 1914-1945 (ENGL 377)

Section: 102 #5472
Instructor: J. Kerkering
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 PM – 3:35 PM LSC

This course examines works by selected American writers produced between the two World Wars, paying particular attention the contribution of literary works to emerging notions of the "modern." Authors addressed may include Anderson, Cather, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hemingway, Hurston, Lewis, Toomer, Wharton, and Wright.

Advanced Seminar: (ENGL 390)

Section: 19W #2371
Instructor: V. Foster
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20AM – 10:10 AM LSC

What is time?  How do we experience time?  And how have dramatists represented time?  In this course we will consider how dramatists from Shakespeare to the present have explored time — and, more specifically, people in time — as subject and experimented with time as a dramaturgical element in their plays.  Our study will range from plays that observe the unity of time to those that make use of non-linear time and will examine the reasons for both kinds of temporal structures.  We will read:  Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest; Corneille, Le Cid, Strindberg, Miss Julie and A Dream Play, Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard, Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author, Wilder, The Long Christmas Dinner, Priestley, Time and the Conways, Beckett, Waiting for Godot, Pinter, Old Times, Churchill, Top Girls, Stoppard, Arcadia, and Parks, The America Play.  We will augment discussion with video clips when possible.  Requirements:  Major research paper (2 drafts, 15 pages), short paper (5 pages), final exam, class participation, including in-class performance. 

Section: 30W #3207
Instructor: J. Kerkering
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 PM – 2:30 PM LSC

This course traces the commitment to, and critique of, the pastoral account of plantation agriculture from the pre-Civil War period, through the Antebellum period, and into the early 20th century in order to argue that the aesthetic of the pastoral plantation gets displaced onto the New Critical account of the poem. Authors addressed may include Brooks and Warren, Chesnutt, Chopin, Crafts, Faulkner, Harris, Hentz, Kennedy, Ransom, Stowe, and Tate.

Section: 31W #4745
Instructor: P. Caughie
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM LSC

Look at Picasso's portrait of Gertrude Stein (1906) (http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/210008443) and you'll see a likeness but not a coherent representation of a person. Her eyes don't quite match up, her ear isn't finished, her hair is flat and untextured. The realism of much modernist art wasn't, it seems, very realistic. That holds for the novel as well. Replete with details of everyday life, the modernist novel at once captures the material reality of the early 20th century and renders that reality a bit strange. Long revered (or feared) for being "difficult," the modernist novel is in many ways "down to earth." In "How Writing is Written," Gertrude Stein counters the notion of the modernist artist as "avant-guard" with a characteristically simple declarative statement: "everyone is contemporary with his period." What does this homiletic remark mean for our understanding of the modernist novel? Modernist writers lived in the same world of film and radio, omnibuses and airplanes, as their readers. This is the era when people first heard a voice divorced from a body (through the phonograph and the radio), the era of the first transsexual surgeries, the era when women could walk the streets without being streetwalkers. How did such dramatic changes affect writers and readers of novels?

We will explore the modernist novel in its contemporaneity, noting the relation between its formal innovations and its cultural moment—the era of new technology, the "new woman," the "new Negro," and manifestoes like Ezra Pound's "make it new." Our readings will include novels by canonical modernists such as Stein, Woolf, Larsen, and Hemingway, as well as lesser-known writers from the same time and stretching into the postmodern era. We'll read these primary works in relation to other types of writing—anthropology, sexology, cultural theory—from the period as well as in relation to new social, technological, scientific, and cultural developments. Requirements include two short papers (3-4 pages) and a longer essay (8-10 pages), two class "leads" (leading a discussion rather than giving a formal presentation), and regular participation.

ENGL 390-31W is a writing intensive class.

Teaching English to Adults (ENGL 393)

Section: 01S #2369
Instructor: J. Heckman
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 5:30 PM – 10:00 PM LSC

This course offers an excellent opportunity for service learning in the Rogers Park neighborhood and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center located in Dumbach Hall on the Lake Shore Campus in Rooms 05 and 06. No previous tutoring experience is necessary. Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills. Other learners are immigrants or refugees whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps functionally illiterate, and who may know some English or no English. The Center is open M-Th evenings during the fall and spring semesters from 7-9:30 pm. Students may take the English 393 course for 1, 2, or 3 credit hours; when taken for 3 credit hours, the course fulfills the Civic Engagement Core requirement. Students must attend an orientation as well as bi-weekly class meetings (5 class meetings total; a 6th meeting for those students taking the course for 3 credit hours and Core credit). Students tutor one or two evenings a week, depending on the number of credit hours for which they are registered. Students are required to keep and submit a weekly journal of their experiences, examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy, language, and adult education, write four papers throughout the semester, and prepare a final paper or project. Core students have an additional reading and written report. More information can be found at www.luc.edu/literacy; follow the links to "tutoring" and then "course credit tutoring" for a complete description of the requirements for each of the credit hour electives.

Section: 02S #2370
Instructor: J. Heckman
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 5:30 PM – 10:00 PM LSC

(See above)

Internship (ENGL 394)

Section: 394 #2372
Instructor: B. Ahad

Although the Department of English does not directly administer business internships, we do routinely share information and announcements about opportunities for internships with students majoring in English, and we offer academic credit, via English 394, for advanced students who have secured internships. These internships are usually in such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations. Students who are searching for internship opportunities are encouraged to use the resources of the Career Center and of the Center for Experiential Learning, both of which are located in Sullivan Center. Students wishing to enroll in English 394 in conjunction with an internship must have completed six courses in English and have achieved senior or second-semester junior status. An intern will normally work 12 hours a week under professional supervision and will be expected to present a portfolio of work to the director of the internship program at the end of the semester. All interested students should contact the English undergraduate programs director.

The department does offer internships in literacy in conjunction with English 393 (Literacy Internship). The literacy internship, open to all students of sophomore standing or above, is an opportunity to earn course credit by joining the Loyola Community Literacy Center (LCLC), located at 6576 N. Sheridan Rd., 773.508.2330. Interns are required to attend orientation sessions, to tutor two nights each week and to meet with the instructor to discuss their tutoring experiences and integrate them with combining research into literacy with reflections on their experience. For information, contact Jacqueline Heckman at 773.508.2330.

Honors Tutorial: Sexing Romanticism (ENGL 395)

Section: 32W #2373
Instructor: J. Cragwall
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM LSC

In 1792, the Englishwoman Mary Wollstonecraft imported the French Revolution for domestic consumption.  “It is time,” she wrote in her Vindication of the Rights of Woman, “to effect a revolution in female manners.”  We’ll take this second revolution as our subject—though, as we’ll see, political revolution entailed sexual revolution in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and the French Revolution itself was imagined as a crisis in feeling, desire, and gender, rather than law.  We’ll read widely in the philosophical tomes, conduct manuals, sermons and songs that first theorized sexual difference in something like its modern terms—and we’ll study the ways “sexuality” might itself organize the “modernity” that descends to us from the Enlightenment.

But most of all, we’ll study the disorganizations of Romantic sex: the confusions, hysterias, and eccentricities central to the early nineteenth century.  We’ll read Wollstonecraft along with her husband, the sexual-political anarchist William Godwin, as well as the nightmare of procreation their daughter spawned as Frankenstein.  We’ll read the prophecies and gossip of Joanna Southcott, an illiterate servant turned latter-day Virgin Mary, who at the age of sixty-five mistook a fatal dropsy for the Second Coming of Christ (and so captivated a nation).  We’ll put Jane Austen’s marriage plots in the company of Lord Byron’s Don Juan and Sardanapalus, outrageous experiments in transvestism that would surpass Shakespeare and Milton as the best-selling poetry in the history of the English language.  Cockney queers, mice and men, sanctimonious preachers, female vagrants and mad mothers round out the cast.  Papers, presentations, stunt driving. 

Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry (ENGL 397)

Section: 33W #2594
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 PM – 5:15 PM LSC

Advanced Writing Workshop: Fiction (ENGL 398)

Section: 34W #2374
Instructor: D. Kaplan
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

A fiction writing workshop for those who have already taken English 318, which builds upon concepts of fictional art and craft studied there.  Students will write three original stories, which will be discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by one's fellow writers in a supportive workshop environment.  Students will also read the work of master fiction writers.  Class participation is emphasized.

Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399)

Section: 104 #2375
Instructor: B. Ahad

GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSES

Introduction to Graduate Study (ENGL 400)

Section: 800 #2376
Instructor: P. Jay
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 4:15 PM – 5:30 PM LSC

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to graduate-level work in literary studies. It offers concrete, practical advice about choosing your course of study, conducting research, participating actively in class discussion, writing seminar papers, developing conference papers, and thinking ahead to preparing for your doctoral examination and the dissertation, all with an eye toward negotiating the challenges of the job market in English. In addition, we will explore the historical development of English as an academic discipline with some attention to current issues in the profession. And finally, this course will include an overview of literary and critical theories and methodologies you will be encountering in your course work at Loyola. Requirements will include informal critical commentaries, two short critical essays, an in-class presentation, and a longer seminar paper.

Textual Criticism (ENGL 413)

Section: 803 #
Instructor: P. Shillingsburg
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

This course is intended to promote understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of scholarly editing and textual criticism, providing students with the whys and wherefores of textuality involved in composition, revision, publishing, distribution, consumption and interpretation of (literary) texts.  These activities and their strategies and consequences will be studied in a wide variety of contexts, with a view toward understanding the status, functions, and uses of scholarly editions (in print and electronic), developing abilities to perform literary criticism informed by textual criticism, and an understanding of procedures for the production of scholarly editions.  It will provide training for students undertaking or intending to undertake doctoral work in which a core part will involve genetic interpretation and / or the preparation of a genetic textual study or of a scholarly edition.  The course is designed to dovetail with the MA course in electronic publishing (when it is implemented).

The course will examine theories of text, survey the history of textual scholarship, explore the current debates among Anglo-American and European scholars and in other disciplines such as music, philosophy, law and psychology, and provide hands-on textual scholarship in an area of particular interest to each student, contingent upon availability of relevant materials.  Delivery will be by a mixture of lecture, structured discussions, oral reports on individual projects, staged debates, various short papers and a term project.  Students will need to consult their own literary research interests and survey the availability of and access to textual materials.

Chaucer (ENGL 447)

Section: 801 #5475
Instructor: E. Wheatley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

This course will focus on some of the most important poems of Geoffrey Chaucer, including lyrics, dream visions, and most of The Canterbury Tales. We will also read works important to Chaucer, such as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Macrobius’ writings on dreams, and some of his likely source texts. Critical readings will engage with these works in their historical and literary‑historical contexts. Students will learn Middle English grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

17th Century Literature (ENGL 457)

Section: 802 #5476
Instructor: J. Knapp
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

This course will focus on literature from the first half of the 17th century in the context of philosophical, scientific, and theological debates over the nature of material and immaterial “substances”—body and soul for example but also ideas and things—and the relationships between them.  Guiding the organization of the course will be various developments in early modern thought that led to the mind body dualism of René Descartes and related debates surrounding the existence of immaterial substances.  We will explore attitudes towards the material body and its immaterial other in literary texts alongside philosophical treatises, sermons, scientific manuals and other archival material representative of the intellectual tenor of the age.  Literary authors may include: Shakespeare, Middleton, Jonson, Webster, Lanyer, Donne, Bacon, Wroth, Herbert, Hobbes, Vaughan, Bradstreet, and Crashaw. 

Topics in American Literature (ENGL 490)

Section: 804 #5478
Instructor: J. Glover
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

Literature is often thought of as synonymous with the printed word.  But print often signifies in tandem with other ways of sharing information, including writing, oral publication, and public readings and performances. In this course, we will undertake a comparative survey of the English-language literatures of the early Atlantic world.  Our aim will be to situate English colonial writing in a broader public context that included Spanish, French, Dutch and Native cultures.  Our readings will range across a number of genres, including settlement histories, spiritual autobiography, and captivity narratives, as well as several different forms of media, including print, manuscript, oratory and performance.  We will discuss topics such as conquest and discovery, religion and magic, intercultural encounter, independence movements and nationhood, states as publishers, and the theory and practice of international law.  Our focus throughout will be on written and printed artifacts rather than anthologized texts.

African-American Literature (ENGL 496)

Section: 805 #5479
Instructor: B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 4:15 PM – 5:30 PM LSC

This course highlights some current (and exciting!) debates that are reshaping traditional disciplinary boundaries in the field of African-American literature. Recently, scholars have begun to suggest that “blackness” is no longer sustainable as a locus of identity precisely because racial identities have been so “thoroughly abstracted from any social context.” Correspondingly, literary critics are questioning the value, and even the existence, of African-American literature in an increasingly “post-racial” world. According to Kenneth Warren, “…African American literature itself constitutes a representational and rhetorical strategy within the domain of a literary practice responsive to conditions that, by and large, no longer obtain.” The course will be structured in dialogue to Warren’s provocative claim that what we once knew as African American or “black” literature is “of rather recent vintage.” Some questions we will consider are: To what extent does African-American literature continue to function as a mode of self-articulation and “protest?;” What, if anything, is the political currency of African-American literature? Specifically, how does black literature intersect with more contemporary politics around immigration, sexuality, human rights, etc.?; And finally, does African-American literature, as it has been historically defined, now cease to exist or have the “conditions” to which it responds simply shifted in nature and form? In order to address these questions, we will be reading fictional narratives from the era of slavery to the present, as well as critical texts and essays including, Representing the Race: A New Political History of African American Literature (Garrett), Freedom with Violence: Race, Sexuality, and the US State (Reddy), the special issue of African-American Review on post-soul literature, Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African-American Literary History (Ernest), and, of course, What Was African-American Literature? (Warren)



Loyola

Department of English
Crown Center for the Humanities
1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
773.508.2240

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