Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Fall 2011 Courses

Business Writing (ENGL 210)

Section: 20W #2893
Instructor:  Danna, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25AM – 11:15AM WTC

ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  21W #2894
Instructor:  Danna, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30PM – 3:45 PM WTC

ENGL 210-21W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  60W #3182
Instructor:   Janangelo, Joseph
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. WTC 

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience in reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group class presentation.

ENGL 210-60W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 61W #2895
Instructor:  Janangelo, Joseph

3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. WTC

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience in reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group class presentation. 

ENGL 210-61W is a writing intensive class.


Writing Center Tutor Practicum (ENGL 220)

Section: 62W #5071
Instructor: Meinhardt, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC

ENGL 220-62W is a writing intensive class.


Introduction to Poetry (ENGL 271)

Section: 01W #3251
Instructor: Cramond, H.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m. LSC

Students will learn critical terminology and gain overview of critical perspectives that will aid them in the analysis of poetry. Our primary text will be The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry. Students will also read work from earlier periods and contemporary small presses.  To satisfy the Writing Intensive requirement, students will complete five short response papers and two longer essays. 

ENGL 271-01W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 02W #3477
Instructor:  Jacobs, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 - 3:35 p.m. LSC 

ENGL 271-02W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  03W #3478
Instructor:  Chinitz, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. LSC 

Through close attention to the basic elements of poetry--voice, rhythm, form, tone, etc.--students will develop their ability to read, enjoy, and write about this art. Readings for the course include poems written by over 60 authors. The bulk of our class time will be spent in discussion and analysis of these works. Assignments will include writing exercises and short essays, reading quizzes, and midterm and final exams.

ENGL 271-03W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 04W #4054
Instructor:  Kendrick, C.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. LSC

The course will be a survey of British and American poetry, especially from the Romantic Movement on, especially of lyric kinds.  Class discussion will generally focus on the form and sense of individual poems, and will in general be about poetic ways of meaning. 3 short papers, 2 longer (5-6 pp.) papers, 4 short exams, a midterm, and a final. 

Section: 060 #3479
Instructor:  Culliton, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m. LSC

Section: 061 #5939
Instructor:  Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. LSC

Why should we care about poetry – and how should we care about it?  And why do the answers to these two questions seem so similar?  We’ll start historically – who before us cared about poetry, and why?  We’ll study the pressure poems put on their historical moment, and how they’re shaped by it in surprising ways: for example, our discussion of Shakespeare will start with the formation of “Shakespeare” as a figure, often at odds with the “evidence” of the poems, of canonical standards throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a program that affected even the spelling of his poems.  Most of the authors in our anthology were white, male, and rich – how has literature been used to promote a series of questions and assumptions that they may have shared (sometimes called “the canon”), and how has it, even in these same authors, blown apart all the stereotypes and orthodoxies we’d expect to find?  We’ll watch the invention not only of English (and then British) culture, but of the English language itself, its twists and triumphs, detours and degenerations – and most importantly, we’ll watch as language, especially literary language, is fashioned into the greatest vehicle of social (as well as aesthetic) contest.  Papers, exams, corporal punishment, unlicensed dentistry.


Introduction to Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 05W #4055
Instructor:  Boyle, T.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. LSC

This course of studies will include texts that actively critique the importance of religion on the creative imagination, in particular Catholicism.  The quest for meaning, whether religious or secular, can lead to some interesting works of drama. Modernist theater, for instance, with its quest fornewness, has sought to dramatize the problems associated with religious faith (Samuel Beckett’sWaiting For Godot).  While the depictions can sometimes be sympathetic, sometimes skeptical, there is an underlying affirmation, and legitimization of the immense influence religion has had on forming our understanding of life.

ENGL 272-05W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 062 #2458
Instructor:  Boyle, T.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 a.m. – 10:10 a.m. LSC

Section: 063 #3590
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. LSC


Introduction to Fiction (ENGL 273)

Section:  064 #3532
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 a.m. – 9:05 a.m. LSC

Section: 065 #4057
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 a.m. – 10:10 a.m. LSC

Section:  066 #4058
Instructor:  Guerra, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. LSC

In this course we’ll examine the function of fiction by following a range of authors who slant, skew, timeshift, and otherwise disrupt the views and flow of modern life to stoke the imagination and force us to think deeply about our role in the world around us. We’ll begin with masters of the dark and cerebral short story—Edgar Allan Poe, Flannery O’Connor, Jorge Borges, and George Saunders—and move on to the wry wit of longer works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kurt Vonnegut, and Philip K. Dick. In the process, we’ll hone our skills as analysts and interpreters, doing the important work of bringing unreality into contact with the real. To this end, we will learn how to approach fiction from a range of theoretical perspectives while also examining its basic structures. Course requirements include class participation, two short papers, a midterm, and a longer final essay.

Section:  067 #3967
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m. LSC

Section:  607 #3481
Instructor: Rodriguez, R.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 – 9:30 LSC

This course will foreground the pleasures of close reading.  That is, instead of rushing through the book to see how it turns out, we will slow things down to dwell on passages rich in texture and thought.  The payoff for us will be a deeper and more pleasurable understanding not just of the artistic and intellectual elements that make up the literary text but of the act of reading itself.  Through close readings of texts, students will develop a critical appreciation for the shock and awe style of Bram Stoker, the almost impenetrable weirdness of Franz Kafka and Julio Cortazar, the subtle formal elegance of Vladimir Nabokov and Miranda July, and the surreal broad comedy of Aimee Bender and Etgar Keret. 

Section:  069 #4056
Instructor: Walsh, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. LSC

Henry James claims that the success of a work of fiction is determined by "the degree to which is produces a certain illusion; that illusion makes it appear to us for the time that we have lived in another life-- that we have had a miraculous enlargement of experience" (Theory of Fiction).  To experience that "enlargement" we will read parables, fables, and fairy tales, short stories and several novels from different periods of time and differing societies.  We will use reading protocols, close reading strategies, reader response, and other critical methods as ways of getting the most out of our reading.  I hope my students will exit the class understanding, appreciating, and enjoying the artistry of good and great fiction and delighting in entering the fictional worlds about which James speaks.

Section:  606 #4059
Instructor: Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC


Introduction to Shakespeare (ENGL 274)

Section:  071 #4061
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 a.m. – 1:25 p.m. LSC

In this course we will study eight of Shakespeare's plays, including plays from a variety of genres--comedy, history, tragedy, romance--and from various stages of his career as a playwright. We will consider the plays in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare's own development as a playwright. We will also explore ways in which the plays allow for a variety of interpretations and kinds of performance, and consider various critical approaches. Requirements will include papers, a midterm, and a final. 

Please note:  English Majors should take ENGL 326, not ENGL 274. 

Section:  072 #4062
Instructor: Conley, L.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TH 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 LSC

In this course, we will read a selection of eight plays from the Shakespeare canon, representing the four genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance.  Approximately half of these plays will be examples of Shakespeare's collaboration with other authors of his time.  By looking at Shakespeare as a co-author and as a member of the theatrical community of early modern London, we will examine what it meant to be a playwright in Shakespeare's world, and how that occupation fit in with the larger social and political framework surrounding the composition of these texts.  We will have weekly quizzes, some group work, a midterm, a paper, and a final exam.  You may also be required to attend a live performance at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater (for which group-rate tickets will be available).   

Please note:  English Majors should take ENGL 326, not ENGL 274. 

Section:  08W #4060
Instructor: Biester, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 LSC

In this course we will study eight of Shakespeare's plays, including plays from a variety of genres--comedy, history, tragedy, romance--and from various stages of his career as a playwright. We will consider the plays in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare's own development as a playwright. We will also explore ways in which the plays allow for a variety of interpretations and kinds of performance, and consider various critical approaches. Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class. Requirements will include papers, response papers, a midterm, and a final. 

ENGL 274-64W is a writing intensive class.

Please note:  English Majors should take ENGL 326, not ENGL 274. 


Chief American Writers I to 1865 (ENGL 277)

Section:  06W #4063
Instructor:  Glover, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15

This course is a survey of American literature from the colonial period through the Civil War.  It begins with early narratives of discovery and settlement, and stretches to the fiction and poetry of the early national period.  We will consider a wide range of American writings, from the journals of Pilgrim settlers to the autobiographies of freed slaves.  Our texts will also represent numerous genres, including diaries, lyric poetry, novels, political tracts, audio recordings, and public readings. The chief objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the major writers of this period and to learn the critical terminology necessary to read them. While we will focus on printed and written materials, we will also consider other forms of media including sermons, songs, performances, and popular ballads. As we will see, the American literary tradition does not simply exist in the past but continues to shape the present we share.

ENGL 277-06W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  073 #3482
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 p.m.


Chief American Writers II 1865 to the Present (ENGL 278)

Section:  074 #2459
Instructor:  Bell, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 LSC

This course will examine American literature from 1865-thePresent in relation to the question of empire and anti-imperialism.  What role did literature play in the emergence of what some call “American imperialism”?  What role did literature also play in the resistance to imperialist projects?  How did literary innovation interact with the transformation of American individuals and the American nation?  We will read a variety of genres—fiction, prose (speech, lecture, essay), poetry, oral literature and song—by writers with diverse American identities.  The course text will be the Sixth Edition of the Heath Anthology of American Literature (Volumes C, D, and E) with an emphasis on selections by writers such as Mark Twain, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Jose Marti, James Weldon Johnson, William Carlos Williams, Meridel LeSeuer, Gwendolyn Brooks, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Bharati Mukerjee.  Course requirements include class presentations, one research paper, and essay exams.

Section:  07W #2460 
Instructor:  Delancey, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 – 10:10 a.m. LSC

This course will chart the development of Modernism in American literature and culture from its emergence in the late nineteenth century to its ascendancy and dominance throughout the greater part of the twentieth.  The authors we will read—among them, T. S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Hart Crane, Ralph Ellison, Vladimir Nabokov, Elizabeth Bishop—address the perennial American issues, but they do so within the context of a dialogue with the forces that give Modernism its distinctive character. Our first question will be historical: for these authors, what does it mean to be “Modern?” Our second question will be cultural: what does it mean to be American in the Modern period?


Medieval Culture (ENGL 279)

Section: 103 #3744
Instructor:  Hastings, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45p.m. LSC

This course will focus on the textual records of the English Middle Ages in contexts delimited by history, art history, and material culture as well as Classical and Continental literature.  Through rigorous engagement of these literary works within their contexts, students will come to understand more fully some of the broad trajectories and key ideas of the period.  Works to be studied will include Beowulf, Bede’s Historia Ecclesiastica, Sir Gawain and the Green Night, Pearl, Langland’s Piers Plowman, and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.


Introduction to African American Literature (ENGL 282)

Section:  075 #3190
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 LSC

Section:  068 #5957
Instructor:  Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 LSC

This course serves as an introduction to the African American literary tradition. In addition to reading and interpreting works by prominent African-American writers from the era of slavery to the contemporary present, we will also discuss the major shifts and movements that have constituted the black literary tradition, like the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the “Post-Soul” era. We will consider representative works by African American novelists, poets, and essayists and consider the various ways they respond to dominant artistic conventions of their respective periods.  Some questions we will consider are: What is African American literature? What are some major themes and concerns that have defined African-American literature? And, where does the future of African-American literature seem to point? Requirements for this course include regular attendance, vigorous participation, in-class writing exercises, quizzes, a mid-term and a final exam.

This course fulfills the multicultural and post-1900 literature requirements.


Women in Literature (ENGL 283)

Genius, Madness &The Victorian Woman
Section:  076 #5973
Instructor:  Coleman, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 – 9:45 a.m. LSC

During the Victorian period, women’s passions, desires, and intellectual curiosity were often cast as indications of the madness to which their sex supposedly made them vulnerable. In such a climate, how did women writers assert their creativity and intellectual autonomy? Looking at both medical-historical ideas about the female mind and writing in multiple genres by George Eliot, M. E. Braddon, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and others, we will consider the complexity of Victorian women’s relationships to dominant narratives about gender, power, and the female mind and how they used writing to reaffirm, resist, or subvert cultural expectations about their intellectual work and ability. Students will become familiar with methods and vocabulary for analyzing and discussing literature through various assignments including quizzes, presentations, and critical essays.

Deconstructing The Diva
Section:  09W #3484

Instructor:  Bradshaw, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 – 10:10 a.m. LSC

Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are perhaps the most visible women in our culture.  On the one hand, as a woman who stares down cameras and sings loudly and unabashedly, the diva represents empowerment: she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous.  On the other hand, the diva is a figure of extreme appropriation: consumed and absorbed into people’s lives, she is the object of obsessive fandom.  In shaping her own identity, the diva often serves as a vehicle for shaping others’.  Through fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory, this class will explore the paradoxes and problems of the “woman with a voice” and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity.

ENGL 283-09W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  10W #2723
Instructor:  Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
12:35 – 1:25 p.m. LSC

This course will focus on influential writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a woman's intellectual tradition. We will read poets ranging from Stevie Smith to Phyllis Wheatley; fiction witers ranging from Flannery O'Connor to Elizabeth Gaskell; and essayists ranging from Virginia Woolf to Mary Wollstonecraft.  Our textbook will be The Norton Anthology of Literature in English by Women, 3rd edition.   

As “writing intensive,” this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer.  Assignments include reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a mid-term essay examination, a final examination, and one critical paper, to be written in stages with draft submissions. 

ENGL 283-10W is a writing intensive class.

Contemporary Women’s Memoir
Section:  11W #3483

Instructor:  Weller, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 LSC

When we want to know about how women perceive the world around them, their communities, their language, their politics and passions, their lives, a foundational place to start is literature—the space where ideas and details paint a bird’s-eye-view of the human experience. And while fiction and poetry create a stunningly sentient record and vivid imagining, I believe it is memoir where women writers face the slippery truth of their own lived experience, and attempt to find meaning therein.  It is where they grapple with the memories of events and relationships that molded them into the writers and women they are, and where they wrestle with poetic reflection on the effect of these struggles.  In this course we will read a selection of creative non-fiction memoirs by a wide range of contemporary female writers such as Maxine Hong-Kingston, Marjane Satrapi, bell hooks, Marya Hornbacher, Alice Sebold, Ann Fessler, Patricia Hampl, MaryKarr, and Lucy Grealy. Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core. Focusing on literature written by 20thcenturywomen authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts.

ENGL 283-11W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  12W #5146
Instructor:  Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35

This course will focus on influential writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a woman's intellectual tradition. We will read poets ranging from Stevie Smith to Phyllis Wheatley; fiction witers ranging from Flannery O'Connor to Elizabeth Gaskell; and essayists ranging from Virginia Woolf to Mary Wollstonecraft.  Our textbook will be The Norton Anthology of Literature in English by Women, 3rd edition.   

 

As “writing intensive,” this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer.  Assignments include reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a mid-term essay examination, a final examination, and one critical paper, to be written in stages with draft submissions. 

ENGL 283-12W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  13W #2461
Instructor:  Bouson, J.B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15

“If women have learned many of the ways they interpret their lives from the narrative schemata of novels and stories,” writes Joanne Fry, “they can also gain from fiction new insights into the narrative processes of constructing meaning.”  Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core.  Focusing on literature written by 20th-  and 21st-century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts. Analyzing representative works of fiction written by women authors, this course will investigate the important cultural and gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, the female body, romantic love, mother-child relationships, and female friendship in their works.  The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, and Toni Morrison.  There will be oral presentations, papers, a midterm and a final exam.

ENGL 283-13W is a writing intensive class


Introduction to Film History (ENGL 284)

Section:  14W #3486 
Instructor:  Kessel, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 LSC

Cinema is one of the youngest human art forms, and yet it draws expression and material from many older arts: painting, sculpture, drama, dance, music, literature, and photography. It has incorporated exciting new modes in the digital age. While cinema has always been truly global, films reflect the artistic philosophy of the time and place in which they are made and of the artists who make them. Since making movies requires a great expenditure of resources, cinema also entails economic, technological, and political repercussions and influences. In this survey course we will move through the history of film from its earliest beginning to the present day, viewing, discussing, and writing about movies from many countries, eras, and artistic movements.

ENGL 284-14W is a writing intensive class.

Section: 077 #2463 
Instructor: Staff 
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 LSC 


Religion and Literature (ENGL 287)

Section:  15W #5978
Instructor:  Bosco, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 LSC

Description:  For most of human culture, the literary arts were often wedded to moments of religious inspiration.  Even the last centuries of literature returns again and again to religious faith as the creative matrix of artistic creation.  This core class approaches the various genres of literature by examining both classic and contemporary texts shaped by religious impulse and vision.  Though heavily focused on Catholic Christianity (as this is the professor’s scholarly competence), the course will offer comparison pieces in the Jewish, Muslim, and Hindu tradition.  This is an intensive writing course, which means there will be five (5) shorter papers and NO tests.

ENGL 287-15W is a writing intensive class.


Nature in Literature (ENGL 288)

Section: 078 #3487
Instructor: Delancey, M.
3.0 credit hours lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 LSC

We will treat the idea of “Nature” in the broadest possible sense, as that which encompasses us, and yet in a sense is other than us, and we will be reading texts that provide the widest possible historical range of attitudes toward it, discussing them in roughly the historical sequence in which they occur.  The syllabus will include the following texts: the Bhagavad Gita; Plato’s  Phaedrus; the Book of Job from the Old Testament; St. Paul’s Epistles; Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream; a selection of poems by William Wordsworth;  Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.


Society in Literature (ENGL 289)

Urban Space And Identity In Comics
Section:  079 #3489

Instructor: Kolkey, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 LSC 

Frequently maligned and vilified, comics have often served as a vehicle for political discourse and telling the stories of historically marginalized groups. This course will investigate urban life and identity as they are depicted in comics and graphic novels. We will begin with a formalist introduction to the narrative medium, drawing on the work of Scott McCloud and Will Eisner. We will then read several graphic novels and paperback collections of comics, focusing on questions regarding the day-to-day anxieties of life in the city, the position of immigrants and minorities within the social order, the conflict between modern urban life and Romantic constructions of art and identity, and how the formal conventions of comics, as well as their social and commercial status, serve to explore these concerns. The texts we will read include American Splendor by Harvey Pekar, A Contract with God by Will Eisner, From Hell by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell, The Invisibles by Grant Morrison, and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. We will conclude with two Pulitzer Prize-winning novels that draw on the world of comics to address similar ideas: Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay and Junot Díaz's The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Graded requirements will consist of two short papers, an oral presentation, and participation in class discussion.

Section:  16W #2464
Instructor:  Shapiro, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 LSC

ENGL 289-16W is a writing intensive class.

Section:  17W #2465
Instructor:  Shapiro, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. LSC

ENGL 289-17W is a writing intensive class.


Human Values in Literature (ENGL 290)

Section:  080 #2466
Instructor:  Janowski, L.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 – 9:05 p.m. LSC

"Every family is happy in the same way;" says Leo Tolstoy at the start of his novel, Anna Karenina, "every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." A happy family–a universal if elusive goal? The hope of civilization? A phony pipedream? In this course, we will try to discover, through 20th and 21st century American literature, exactly what human values are espoused when we speak, so very glibly, about "family values." What models of the American family do we find represented in fiction, drama and poetry? Do these portrayals capture the lived experience of their historical times, and how do these representations square with our own experience of family?

Section:  081 #____
Instructor:  Wallace, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
2:45 – 3:35 p.m. LSC

In this section of English 290, we will study the “hero” and “superhero” models in European and American literature.  We will take a broad historical perspective, in order to explore how the cultural functions of heroic legends evolve from Hercules to Don Juan to Superman. We will examine how the interplay between heroes and their cultures has contributed both to the heroes themselves and the society’s history.  Our main aim will be to define different models of heroism and question what those models can teach us about popular visions, ideals, and desires. Our course will be writing intensive. Students should plan to share writing with both the professor andpeers.

Section:  082 #6002
Instructor:  Mann, H.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

Human Values in Literature satisfies 3 credits of the University Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and Experience and in the Values Area of Understanding and Promoting Justice.  In addition, these two sections of the course meet the multicultural requirement of the English major and minor.  Finally, while English 290-18W is a Writing Intensive course, English 290-082 is reserved for first year students enrolled in the Arts in Society Learning Community.

Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, these sections of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations.  To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values, at the same time that we consider the larger role of art in society.  In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.

Section:  18W #4065
Instructor:  Mann, H.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 p.m.

Human Values in Literature satisfies 3 credits of the University Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and Experience and in the Values Area of Understanding and Promoting Justice.  In addition, these two sections of the course meet the multicultural requirement of the English major and minor.  Finally, while English 290-18W is a Writing Intensive course, English 290-082 is reserved for first year students enrolled in the Arts in Society Learning Community.

Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, these sections of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations.  To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values, at the same time that we consider the larger role of art in society.  In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.

ENGL 290-18W is a writing intensive class. 

Section:  63W #4066
Instructor:  Janangelo, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 – 9:30 p.m.
 WTC

Our themes are leadership and mentoring as they appear in and across multiple texts. We will examine several works in which young people address and debate important questions such as: what does it mean to be or become a leader, and how can I mentor others? Our course is writing-intensive; you will write several essays and participate in draft conferences and participate in peer-editing.

ENGL 290-63W is a writing intensive class. 

 


English Language: History (ENGL 300)

Section:  083 #6005
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 - 12:45 p.m.

This course will explore the history of the English from its roots before written history to the language spoken in twenty-first century America, visiting along the way Old English poetic metaphors, the Elizabethan word-craze, and Noah Webster’s spelling reforms.   We will consider social and cultural factors in the development of the English language, influences from other languages, and changes in grammar, sounds and vocabulary.  Students will learn to make phonetic transcriptions and to carry out their own linguistic analyses of short texts from different historical periods.  The grade for the course will be based on active class participation, workbook exercises, a midterm test, and a final paper.


Grammar:  Principles and Pedagogy (ENGL 303)

Section: 611 #4067
Instructor: Fitzgerald, C.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 – 9:30 p.m.

The goal of this course is to explore English grammar not only as a list of rules and  regulations that govern linguistic behavior but also as a means for students to more clearly convey their ideas in speech and writing.  The rules of English grammar are not as strict as they once were, but there is still a noticeable difference between standard and substandard English.  The ability to discern this difference can improve the image one projects as well as one’s career advancement. This course will examine all elements of English grammar from parts of speech and how they function in a sentence to proper punctuation and how it enhances clear and precise prose.  While studying proper usage, students will discover that words commonly used in one context may not be appropriate in another. This course will also promote an appreciation for the English language and investigate techniques for utilizing language effectively in speech and writing. This course is required for students planning to teach high school English, but it is also open to others. 


Studies in Women Writers (ENGL 306)

Section: 085 #6007
Instructor: Bouson, J.B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 306 will focus on literature written by twentieth- and twenty-first-century women authors. This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s writings and to understand the ways in which women novelists use fiction to challenge inherited cultural and literary assumptions; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; and to help them become familiar with the application of feminist theory to works by women authors.  In English 306, the instructor will provide necessary background information on the works covered and will model how to perform close readings of literary texts as she guides students in the investigation of the structures and strategies of representative works of women-authored fiction. The instructor will also place emphasis on the gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read in the course, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, coming to age, the female body, romantic love, mother-child relationships, and female friendships in their works.  The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, and Nancy Mairs.  There will be oral presentations, papers, a midterm and a final exam.

This course fulfills the post-1900 period requirement of the English major.


Feminism and Gender Theory (ENGL 307)

Section:  086 #6008
Instructor:  Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45p.m. LSC 

What is a feminist analysis?  How does feminist theory relate to gender theory?  How do feminist theory and gender theory relate to transgender theory? How do contemporary feminist and (trans)gender studies scholars understand such concepts as gender, sexuality, femininity, and masculinity?  What difference do feminist and (trans)gender theories make to our understanding of popular culture, our lived experiences as gendered subjects, and our ability to engage in social and political change?  We will attempt to answer such questions by reading books and articles in contemporary feminist, gender, and transgender theory from scholars in various disciplines: e.g.,  philosophers Sandra Bartky, Judith Butler, and Marilyn Frye; biologists Anne Fausto-Sterling and Joan Roughgarden; anthropologist Emily Martin; historian Michel Foucault; and literary scholar Susan Bordo.  By reading novels and memoirs, and viewing films, we will also learn how to translate these theories into practice and how to produce a feminist literary or cultural analysis. Requirements include short responses to the readings, three short essays, and a final exam. The course is designed for both English and Women's Studies and Gender Studies majors.


The Writing of Poetry (ENGL 317)

Section:  087 #2468
Instructor:  Anderson, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 – 5:15 p.m. LSC

English 317 is an introductory course in writing poetry. It is designed to provide practice and instruction in the art and craft of poetry. Specifically, the course will familiarize you with the elements of language, the complexities of form, the feel of the line, the image, and the play of sound in poetry. The course will also familiarize you with the pluralism and eclecticism that marks contemporary American poetry through a close study of selected poems.

Section:  088 #2470 
Instructor:  Wilson, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 – 5:15 p.m.

This course will introduce students to creative approaches to poetry writing. Specifically, we will explore certain poetic techniques and examine various works by ancient, modern, and contemporary authors who have enlivened the terrain of poetry. In addition to testing out the waters of your own creativity, this course will offer a space to appreciate the richness of literature more broadly.  Functioning as an introductory workshop where we’ll share our own writing, over the course of the semester we will also explore how good writing—in a variety of forms—can take shape.  Our class time will be spent in a several ways: whole class discussions, individual writing exercises, small group and paired collaborations, and, as the semester develops, small group workshops with your peers. By the end of the term, students will have had a wealth of hands-on experience with poetry writing, and students will turn in a final chapbook of the best work written over the course of the term.


The Writing of Fiction (ENGL 318)

Section:  089 #2471
Instructor:  Kaplan, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:45 – 5:15 p.m. LSC

Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction in a supportive, workshop environment through (a) reading master writers; (b) writing three original stories; and (c ) having these stories discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by fellow writers. Class participation is emphasized.

Section:  608 #6010
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC

Section:  610 #2629
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC


Writing Creative Nonfiction (ENGL 319)

Section:  090 #6011
Instructor:  Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. LSC


English Lit: Medieval Period (ENGL 320)

Section:  091 #6012
Instructor: Staff
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 LSC 

In this course we will read a variety of medieval romances, focusing especially on how and why they use supernatural elements: fairies, monsters, magic and miracles.  We will read selected Lais by Marie de France, three Canterbury Tales, selected books of Malory’s Morte Darthur, and other English romances.  We will also look at a few non-romance texts - histories, travel literature and saints’ lives - and compare and contrast their approach with the romances, as well as making use of critical readings.  Students will experience a lively range of medieval texts and will develop an understanding of the romance mode and its varied manifestations.  Most texts will be read in Middle English, but extensive help with the language will be given – by the end of the course, you will be reading with confidence and ease.  The course grade will be based on class participation, one or two short papers, a midterm exam and a final paper.


British Lit: The Renaissance (ENGL 325)

Section:  092 #2472
Instructor: Kendrick, C.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 LSC 

The course is a literary survey of the “long” English Renaissance (c. 1516 – 1660), with an emphasis on poetry.  We will spend a relatively large amount of time on five writers’ works:   Thomas More, Christopher Marlowe, Isabella Whitney, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell; and you should leave the course with a fairly good sense of these writers as authors.  We will also be reading a good deal of work by other writers, enough to provide a sense of the conventions available in the period. Special attention will be paid to questions of genre; to changing notions of authorship and publication; to representations of gender and social and religious change.  Two papers, a midterm, and a final.


The Plays of Shakespeare (ENGL 326)

Section:  093 #2473 
Instructor: Shapiro, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25-11:15 a.m. LSC

Section:  094 #2474
Instructor:  Knapp, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 LSC

This course will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays in all the major genres (comedy, history, tragedy, and romance).  We will read the plays through a variety of critical approaches, taking into account the historical context in which they were produced.  If possible students will attend a live production of Shakespeare in order to emphasize the importance of dramatic literature as theater.  Throughout the course of the semester we will focus on the development of drama in England, the material history of the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage, and the political and cultural place of the theater in Shakespeare’s England.  Plays may include: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, Henry V, King Lear, Othello, and The Winter’s Tale. The primary text will be David Bevington’s edition of the Complete Works of Shakespeare, 6th edition.  There will be papers, a midterm and a final.


Studies in the Romantic Period (ENGL 338)

Section:  095 #6024
Instructor:  Jones, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45p.m. LSC

The British Romantic period in literary history, 1789-1832, was also the great age of the graphical satire, an era that has been called “the efflorescence of caricature.” In this class we’ll read Romantic poetry by Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and others, but we’ll also learn to “read” cartoons from the period by artists such as James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, and George Cruikshank, interpreting them as visual and verbal representations of the age of George III, the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars, the Reform movement and its suppression, and the Queen Caroline Affair. The poetry and the graphical prints share topics, but they also share a “language” of images, an iconography, as well as certain satiric styles and representational approaches. The cartoons, which were extremely popular, often shed light on the aims and rhetorical strategies of Romantic poetry. One goal of the course will be to place Romantic poetry in the context of this popular “new media” of its day. Another goal will be to learn how prints were made and distributed and received--and what prints can tell us about “print culture” in the nineteenth century. We’ll study available online digital reproductions, but we’ll also have direct experience with primary sources in the Thomas J. Michalak Collection in Loyola’s library, a portion of which is now being digitized with the collaboration of the Libraries and the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities. Student term research projects may involve hands-on Digital Humanities work in helping to digitize, catalogue, and annotate the prints for Loyola’s archives. This interdisciplinary course will combine elements of literary studies, history, art history, and media studies, all in the context of the set of practices known as the Digital Humanities. (This course meets the English department’s 1700-1900 period requirement.) See Steven Jones’s website (http://stevenejones.org) for the complete syllabus when it becomes available.


British Literature: The Victorian Period (ENGL 340)

Section 096 #2475
Instructor: Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11: 30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. LSC

In this course, we will study literature written in England between 1837 and 1900.  The primary aim of the course is the understanding and appreciation of Victorian literature, to be accomplished through analysis and criticism of representative works.  The emphasis will fall on selected authors and works studied thoroughly rather than on a great deal touched on lightly.   Information will be provided on the period’s political, social, cultural, philosophical and religious characteristics in order to further better comprehension of the literary texts.  Our texts will be The Norton Anthology of English Literature:The Victorian Age, 8th ed., vol. E, and Dickens’ David Copperfield, Norton edition.      


Contemporary Critical Theory (ENGL 354)

Section:  097 #2476
Instructor: Jay, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 LSC

Section:  609 #3880
Instructor: Kerkering, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 – 9:30 p.m. LSC

In this course students will become familiar with the wide range of questions that critics bring to bear on literary works when those critics write literary criticism.  Students will learn to read and understand the philosophical and historical bases of certain theoretical questions, to recognize these questions lying behind the literary criticism they read, and to compose literary analyses with these theories serving as a foundation for their work.  Assignments will include short distillations of arguments as well as medium (5-page) and longer (8-page) papers.

 


Modern Poetry (ENGL 361)

Section:  098 #4070
Instructor:  Chinitz, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. LSC

In this course we will read and discuss the work of such major modern poets as William Butler Yeats, Marianne Moore, T. S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), and Ezra Pound. These poets illustrate several different ways of being “modern,” and we will discuss both what distinguishes them individually and the ways in which their artistic projects overlap. We will focus on their writing techniques as well as on the historical-cultural contexts that shaped their ideas and aesthetics. Assignments will include two essays, a midterm and a final exam.

 


The Modern Novel (ENGL 371)

Section:  099 #6044
Instructor:  Wexler, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. LSC

This course will examine the modern novel in relation to the historical violence of the last century. Writers faced the problem of representing contemporary violence in a secular culture. They developed strategies that have been associated with avant-garde movements, such as Symbolism, naturalism, Expressionism, modernism, and post-modernism. Although these movements are usually explained in aesthetic terms, formal features have a cultural function. We will study the social function of form by focusing on the following novels: Heart of Darkness, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, The Tin Drum, Panorama, Austerlitz, Bend in the River


American Literature to 1865 (ENGL 375)

Section:  100 #3235
Instructor:   Glover, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 p.m. LSC

Literature is often thought of as synonymous with the printed word.  But print often functions alongside other ways of sharing information, including oral publication, the circulation of manuscripts, and public readings and performances.   This course surveys the emergence of an English-language American culture from the period of the English colonization of America to the Revolution, with a special emphasis on how print interacted and overlapped with other forms of communication.  The course will consider a broad range of American writing from this period, from the jeremiads of English Puritan reformers to the literatures of republicanism and revolution.  Our literary readings will range from sermons and captivity narratives to canonical classics like Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography, yet along the way, we will also consider a wide range of media, from epitaphs and broadsides to more ephemeral forms of communication like rumors, natural soundscapes, and animal noises.   By looking at print in the context of other ways of sharing and controlling information, we will attempt to recover the cultural production of groups often excluded from literary histories organized around acts of print publication.  When we turn our attention to other forms of media, religious dissenters, women, slaves, and Native Americans appear anew as active agents in the public world of the colonial Americas.  


Theology & Literature (ENGL 383)

Section:  001 #6366
Instructor:  Bosco, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 - 11:15 p.m. LSC

This course engages the interdisciplinary study of literature and Catholic religious discourse.  Two questions frame our discussion:  what role does the imagination play in Christian life; what is the effect of a Catholic religious imagination upon culture, especially on literature.  We will be looking at Catholicism as an "ideological" discourse, approaching it as one among many strategies available to makers of culture.  In using the term "Catholic ideology," I mean those sometimes unconscious traces of philosophy, aesthetics, and theological tendencies in artists that interface with-and perhaps subvert-the more prominent ideologies embedded in the Anglo-American canon of literature.  The course will look at 20th century artists who embody this "Catholic" imagination as a way to investigate the negotiation of difference in modern and contemporary fiction and film.


Advanced Seminar:  ENGL 390

Section:  23W #2479
Instructor:  Biester, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. LSC

This course will examine magic and the representation of magic in the literature and culture of the early modern period, or Renaissance, when ideas about magic overlapped with ideas about nature and science, religion, social and political hierarchy, gender, and crime.  To explore how magic intersected with these various spheres of the culture, and how writers envisioned their art in relation to magic, we will read texts in a variety of genres, including plays, poems, ballads, witchcraft pamphlets, and selections from treatises on magical practices.  Requirements will include both graded and ungraded writing assignments, presentations in class, and a final exam (probably a take-home exam).

This course fulfills the pre-1700 requirement for the major.

ENGL 390-23W is a writing intensive class.

Offbeat Shakespeare
Section:  24W #3493

Instructor:  Gossett, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. LSC

This advanced seminar will examine not “all the Shakespeare you have never read” but a good part of it. We will begin with the early poems that gained Shakespeare great success, Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. In the next sections of the course we will look at plays that Shakespeare wrote alongside, in imitation of, or in competition with his early rival Christopher Marlowe: Tamburlaine and Titus, Dr. Faustus and Richard III, The Jew of Malta and The Merchant of Venice.  Towards the conclusion of the course we will read the little studied Cymbeline and/or Henry VIII; the final syllabus will be established after the first class meeting when students will be asked about their preferences. The main focus of the course will be on deepening our ability to read Shakespeare’s texts and complicating our vision of what “Shakespeare” means, but we may find some surprising connections both within his works (e.g. the concern with Rome that turns up in Lucrece, Titus, Coriolanus and Cymbeline) and between his works and Marlowe’s.

This course fulfills the pre-1700 requirement for the major.

ENGL 390-24W is a writing intensive class.

African-American Lit: 1940 - 1960
Section:  25W #6045

Instructor: Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. 

World War II marked one of the most significant social, political, and economic transformations in the lives of African Americans and perhaps, most importantly, served as the impetus for the Civil Rights movement. Though the years of the war and immediately following were considered the “dry years” for American publishing, African-American literary texts from this period express the conflicting sentiments of hope, possibility, rage, and radicalism that define this historical moment.  This course will focus primarily on fiction and non-fiction produced by significant writers from the period after the Harlem Renaissance and prior to the Civil Rights era, like James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, Dorothy West, Richard Wright, Ann Petry who, through their literary works, continually addressed pressing questions of race, gender, class, citizenship, and the role of art.  Requirements for this course include regular attendance, vigorous participation, a final essay (8-10 pages), and several in-class writing assignments.

This course fulfills the multicultural requirement for English majors.

ENGL 390-25W is a writing intensive class.


Teaching English to Adults (ENGL 393)

[Prerequisite for ENGL 393 is permission and variable credit agreement form]

Section: 01S #2477

ENGL 393 01S is a service learning class.

Instructor: J. Heckman
1.0 - 3.0 credit hours Internship
MW TBA
TBA

and

Section:02S  #2478

ENGL 393 02S is a service learning class.

Instructor: J. Heckman
1.0 - 3.0 credit hours Internship
TR TBA
TBA

ENGLISH 393: Teaching English to Adults Meets at the Loyola Community Literacy Center, 1120-1122 W. Loyola Avenue 1st floor (right next door to the tennis courts)

This course offers an excellent opportunity for service learning in the Rogers Park neighborhood and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center located in Dumbach Hall on the Lake Shore Campus in Rooms 05 and 06.  When taken for 3 credit hours, the course fulfills the Civic Engagement Core requirement.  No previous tutoring experience is necessary.  Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills.  Other learners are immigrants or refugees whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps functionally illiterate, and who may know some English or no English.  The Center is open M-Th evenings during the fall and spring semesters from 7-9:30 pm.  Students may take the English 393 course for 1, 2, or 3 credit hours.  They must attend an orientation as well as bi-weekly class meetings (5 class meetings total; a 6th meeting is held for those students taking the course for 3 credit hours and Core credit).  Students tutor one or two evenings a week, depending on the number of credit hours for which they are registered.  Students are required to keep and submit a weekly journal of their experiences, examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy, language, and adult education, write four papers throughout the semester, and prepare a final paper or project.  Core students have an additional reading and report.  More information can be found at www.luc.edu/literacy; follow the links to "tutoring" and then "course credit tutoring" for a complete description of the requirements for each of the credit hour electives. 


Internship (ENGL 394)


[Prerequisite for ENGL 394 is permission]

Section: 101 #2480
Instructor: Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Internship
  

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.  Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program.  Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples.  Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins.  Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.


Honors Tutorial (ENGL 395)

Beauty
Section:  26W #2481

Instructor: Knapp, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 LSC 

Does a work of literature have to be beautiful to be great?  How do we recognize beauty in literary language?  What do we mean when we say that a poem, sentence, or dramatic scene is beautiful?  How have attitudes towards beauty in literature changed over time?  Is beauty good?  In this course we will explore these and other questions as we read literary works from a variety of periods alongside philosophy and criticism devoted to understanding literary beauty. Readings will include Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, Sidney’s Apology for Poetry, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Shelly’s Frankenstein, and Ian McEwan’s Saturday as well as short stories and poems by Coleridge, Rilke, Joyce, Faulkner, A. S. Byatt, and others.  This is a writing intensive course.  Assignments will include informal reading responses, several short papers, and a longer research paper. 

ENGL 395-26W is a writing intensive class.


Advanced Writing Workshop:  Poetry (ENGL 397)

Section:  22W #2727
Instructor:  Wilson, J.
Prerequisite: ENGL 317
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. LSC

As an advanced writing workshop in poetry, this course will focus on different approaches to making, revising, re-thinking, and re-working our own poems.  This course will be informed largely by our readings of drastically different contemporary authors, with an emphasis on contemporary women poets who are pushing the boundaries of poetics in myriad ways.  Rather than narrow in on mastery, this class will attempt to unearth new methods for writing poetry befitting the complexities of our experiences—zeroing in on influence, music, formal constraints, collage, and a variety of experimental exercises. As a corollary, we’ll draw heavily from poetics statements by some of the 20th Century’s most noted and various poets.

ENGL 397-22W is a writing intensive class.


Advanced Writing Workshop: Fiction (ENGL 398)

Section:  28W #12482
Instructor:  Kaplan, D.
Prerequisite: ENGL 318
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. LSC

A fiction writing workshop for those who have already taken English 318, which builds upon concepts of fictional art and craft studied there. In a supportive workshop environment, students will write three original stories. These stories will be discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by one's fellow writers in the class. Students will also read the work of master fiction writers.  Class participation is emphasized.

ENGL 398-28W is a writing intensive class.


Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399)

Section: 102 #2483 
Instructor: Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture

Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study.  When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration.  Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.


   

GRADUATE COURSES

NOTE: All students who wish to take graduate courses must pre-register with Dr. Pamela Caughie, Graduate Programs Director. 

Intro to Graduate Study (ENGL 400)

Section:  800 #2484
Instructor:  Kerkering, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. LSC

This course introduces incoming graduate students to important issues in the profession of literary studies. It offers insights into current critical theories and methodologies as well as discussion of research techniques and bibliographic methods.  Students will write weekly response papers and annotated bibliographies, one short paper (6-8 pp), and a longer final paper (10-12 pages). 


Contemporary Literary Criticism (ENGL 410)

Section:  801 #6053
Instructor:  Jay, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC

In narrow terms this course will consider various attempts to ground recent literary criticism in a return to “literature itself” and “literariness.” In this context we’ll read critics who call for a return to the exploration of aesthetics, affect, emotion, pleasure, formalism, and narratology (all of these are featured in the October, 2010 issue of PMLA called “Literary Criticism for the Twenty-First Century,” edited by Jonathan Culler, and we’ll start by reading a number of the articles contained in the volume), asking ourselves what happens to history, culture, and politics in such returns?. The wider context for our consideration of these various returns (aside from an analysis of the very trope of a return) will be an analysis of recent declarations that literary studies have gone adrift and that there is a “crisis” in the humanities. We’ll see by reading a range of short essays running back thirty years or so that the humanities have been in a perpetual state of crisis since the early 1980s, and that indeed, a case can be made that they have been in a state of crisis for the entire twentieth-century. Given this fact, we’ll ask what is new about the current crisis in the humanities. What are its implications for literary studies in general, and for literary criticism and theory in particular? With disciplines under pressure in a corporatizing university in an age of scarcity in which practical vocational utility is becoming the new bottom line for justifying work in the humanities, how should the study of literature position itself? What role does literary criticism have in this environment? We can’t separate the narrow question asked by the PMLA special issue without taking these wider changes into account. We’ll do so, and along the way read a range of critics and theorists both debating general questions about the humanities and making concrete propositions about new directions for literary criticism and theory. For the larger historical picture we’ll read selections from Terry Eagleton, Jonathan Culler, Martha Nussbaum, Stanley Fish, Marjorie Garber, and Gerald Graff. We’ll turn to a range of work from younger critics as we explore and assess new work on aesthetics, narratology, close reading, and the role of affect and pleasure in reading and criticism. Requirements will include one short paper, a long seminar paper, and an in-class presentation on your final paper project.


Textual Criticism (ENGL 413)

Section:  802 #3237
Instructor:  Shillingsburg, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC

This course is intended to promote understanding of the practical and theoretical underpinnings of scholarly editing and textual criticism, providing students with the whys and wherefores of textuality involved in composition, revision, publishing, distribution, consumption and interpretation of (literary) texts.  These activities and their strategies and consequences will be studied in a wide variety of contexts, with a view toward understanding the status, functions, and uses of scholarly editions (in print and electronic), developing abilities to perform literary criticism informed by textual criticism, and an understanding of procedures for the production of scholarly editions.  It will provide training for students undertaking or intending to undertake doctoral work in which a core part will involve genetic interpretation and / or the preparation of a genetic textual study or of a scholarly edition.  The course is designed to dovetail with the MA course in electronic publishing (when it is implemented).

The course will survey the history of textual scholarship, explore the current debates among Anglo-American and European scholars and in other disciplines such as music, philosophy, law and psychology, and provide hands-on textual scholarship in an area of particular interest to each student, contingent upon availability of relevant materials.  Delivery will be by a mixture of lecture, structured discussions, oral reports on individual projects, staged debates, various short papers and a term project.  Students will need to consult their own literary research interests and survey the availability of and access to textual materials.


Contemporary Issues in Literature and Culture (ENGL 419)

Section:  803 #4072
Instructor:  Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. LSC

Speaking for and writing about the working-class can put one in an untenable position insofar as one's daily life depends upon the invisibility of their work and because of the elusive and unstable nature of class itself.  "While class is constantly being rethought vis-à-vis the social, it is generally undertheorized in terms of the literary," writes literary critic Peter Hitchcock. In this course, we will confront the ethics and the hermeneutics of reading and writing across class lines. We will analyze literature, film, and theory from the early 20th century to our contemporary era in terms of the semiotics, not just the economics, of class.  We will examine the implications of various definitions of class; analyze how class is negotiated in various types of writing (fiction, memoir, journalism, theory); confront how writers attempt to deal with the discomfort of writing across class boundaries; and discuss the class-inflected history of our own discipline. Reading class in literature is a matter of understanding how aesthetic taste and reading practices do not simply reflect but  constitute class identity, and a matter of understanding how class “acts” in our everyday lives. 

This course will be a seminar in the strict meaning of the term: a group of advanced students studying with a professor and each doing original research and all exchanging research and ideas through reports and discussions (adapted from Webster's Ninth). This course can fulfill either a theory or a modern literature requirement. We will begin with Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction : A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste (1984), and the PMLA Special issue: "Rereading Class" (January 2000). Other theorists we will likely read include Jean Baudrillard, Barbara Herrnstein-Smith, Jacques Rancière, and Rita Felski. Sample literary and filmic works (American and British) include Edith  Wharton’s House of Mirth (1905); Fannie Hurst’s Imitation of Life (1933) and the 1934 film adaptation, Dir. John Stahl; Stella Dallas (1937), Dir. King Vidor; Ann Petry, The Street (1946); Margaret Llewelyn Davies, Life as We Have Known It (1931); Virginia Woolf’s Flush (1933); George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier (1937); Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day  (1988); and Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis (2003).


Offbeat Shakespeare (ENGL 455)                                                   

Section:  804 #____
Instructor: Gossett, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 4:15 - 5:30 p.m. ECLAS LSC

This course will examine not “all the Shakespeare you have never read” but a good part of it. We will begin with the early poems that gained Shakespeare great success, Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. In the next sections of the course we will look at plays that Shakespeare wrote alongside, in imitation of, or in competition with his early rival Christopher Marlowe: Tamburlaine and Titus Andronicus, Dr. Faustus and Richard III, The Jew of Malta and The Merchant of Venice. Depending on the class’s experience, we will read some assortment of Coriolanus, Troilus and Cressida and All's Well that Ends Well, as well as some of Shakespeare’s latest plays and collaborations, including Cymbeline, Henry VIII and Two Noble Kinsmen. (The syllabus will be finalized at the first class meeting.)

For secondary material, as a class we will read two short books to introduce major approaches to Shakespeare today, John Jowett’s Shakespeare and Text (Oxford, 2007) and Jonathan Gil Harris’s Shakespeare and Literary Theory (Oxford, 2010). Students will be responsible for finding specific criticism of the poems and plays under consideration, and one recurrent topic of the course will be the variety of approaches possible to Shakespeare and early modern drama.

Note: before class begins, all students should be familiar with:

Hamlet
King Lear
Henry IV, Part I

At least one “regular” Shakespeare comedy, such as As You Like It, Twelfth Night, or A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Texts:  The preferred text for the course will be the Norton Shakespeare 2nd edition; Riverside or Bevington will also be acceptable, as will single volume Arden or Oxford Classic editions. For Marlowe the text ordered is Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays, ed. Romany and Lindsey.


Topics in Romanticism (ENGL 470)                                                   

Section:  805 #6056
Instructor: Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. LSC

This course is an intensive study of the role of religion in Romantic-era Britain.  Many influential thinkers have argued that European culture underwent a transformative process of secularization during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in which the power of established forms of Christianity withered in the face of an emergent “public sphere” of rational debate and massive textual circulation.  Previously unthinkable blasphemies were now spectacular bestsellers, and Thomas Paine confidently titled the 1790s The Age of Reason, scoffing that Christianity was a thing that could now only “excite laughter by its absurdity, or detestation by its profaneness”: it was “impossible to conceive a story more derogatory to the Almighty, more inconsistent with his wisdom, more contradictory to his power, than this story.”  But just as Paine was publishing, England saw one of the largest religious revivals in its history, and men and women who claimed to speak with God parlayed their powers into astonishing celebrity and influence—this was also, as one of Paine’s competitor’s insisted, The Age of Prophecy.  Within this contest over the national identity (or soul, depending), an exhilaratingly rarefied aesthetics of spontaneous inspiration, transcendent imagination, and visionary power that we have come to call “Romanticism” emerged, and we will explore how a host of writers (especially Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey, Keats, Blake, Byron, and the Shelleys) managed and were managed by secularizing and spiritualizing impulses, in a wide variety of poetry, fiction, and periodical essays.  We’ll also read the prophecies, spiritual autobiographies, and sermons (they’re more exciting than they sound) that were the best-selling books of the era, along with twentienth-century Marxist accounts and revisionist historians who claim “the Enlightenment never happened.” 


Jazz Age (ENGL 484)


Section:  800 #
Instructor: Chinitz, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture

A decade of rapid and profound social change, the "Jazz Age" of the 1920s was also extraordinarily conscious of its own modernity. In this course we will examine the changes in culture, both high and low, that marked this period. Our focus will be interdisciplinary: we will cross over into music, film, and other genres in order to study the culture of the period more comprehensively, and to examine the cross-fertilization and mutual influences among the arts as the age of literary modernism reached its peak. We will read works by such authors as Eugene O’Neill, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Langston Hughes, T. S. Eliot, E. E. Cummings, Nella Larsen, and F. Scott Fitzgerald as we consider such topics as, for example, the cult of the primitive, the reinvention of the "New Woman," the Harlem Renaissance, the rise of modern popular culture, and the relationship of jazz to all these phenomena. Work by Jazz-Age and contemporary critics will supplement our primary readings.


Newberry Seminar (ENGL 540)

Section:  808 #2488
Instructor:  Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TBA Newberry Library

Section:  809 #3508
Instructor:  Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TBA Newberry Librar



Loyola

Department of English
Crown Center for the Humanities
1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
773.508.2240

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