Loyola University Chicago

Office of the President

archive

Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health

Dear Loyola Community,

As Loyola University Chicago’s 150th anniversary approaches, we are excited to announce the launch of one of our biggest and boldest endeavors: the Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health.

A generous $20 million lead gift from Loyola alumni Robert and Elizabeth Parkinson marks the exciting next chapter of the University’s ongoing story of educating men and women who make it their mission to serve others and be advocates for the voiceless and the vulnerable. We are grateful for the Parkinson family’s continued support of Loyola’s institutional vision. Their gift extends Loyola’s renowned work and reputation in health care education, with its foundation in the Stritch School of Medicine and the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing.

The Parkinson School of Health Sciences and Public Health will address the increasing need for health care workers with a variety of skill sets, who will be trained to be leaders, researchers, and caregivers of the future. The health care industry is changing and so is Loyola. 

This means educating public health professionals who can discern disease patterns and causes, who can respond to epidemics, design new social policies and disease prevention strategies to promote community well-being. It means harnessing our powerful partnerships with Trinity Health and Loyola Medicine and using electronic health data to improve patient care and outcomes. It means creating programs that are part of a health care system that is increasingly reliant on not only doctors and nurses, but also administrators, dieticians, therapists, and other health professionals. The Parkinson School will be a venue for collaboration with other departments and schools across Loyola to address social, governmental, economic, and environmental approaches to better health care and greater health equity.

Health care must respond to changing patient needs, and a Loyola education at the Parkinson School will balance knowledge and practice to deepen expertise in a forward-looking model that anticipates an evolving career field. Students in existing programs have already shown the impact a Loyola education has on local and global communities, and as the School of Health Sciences and Public Health continues to grow, that impact will continue to spread.

As with any new chapter, many milestones will be marked. We deeply appreciate the hard work and collaboration from faculty, staff, and students who have helped build the school from the beginning and will continue to propel it forward. We look forward to sharing more developments in the coming weeks and months.

To the entire Loyola community, many thanks for all that you do to educate students and prepare them to serve and care for others. 

Sincerely,

Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD
President

 

Margaret Faut Callahan, CRNA, PhD, FNAP, FAAN
Interim Provost and Chief Academic Officer
Provost, Health Sciences Division