Loyola University Chicago

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Summer Updates

July 26, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

While summer at academic institutions typically provides time for reflection and rejuvenation, the pace for many Loyolans has not slowed, and for good reason. In addition to another successful Summer Sessions program, to date we’ve hosted nine orientations—onboarding more than 2,450 new students—and are preparing to welcome this expected record-breaking first-year class in August. Another important welcome is on the horizon, as President-elect Jo Ann Rooney officially joins us next Monday, August 1. As we look ahead to our 2016–2017 academic year, I want to share some important updates with you.

Fiscal Year 2017 Budget
Last month, the Board of Trustees approved the budget for fiscal year 2017. I want to thank everyone who had a hand in helping us successfully close out fiscal year 2016 and prepare for the new budget during a time of so much uncertainty. We will continue efforts to operate more efficiently, generate new revenue streams, and contain growth in our expenses so as to keep Loyola an affordable education for students. The state budget impasse, which directly impacted the promised MAP funding that so many of our students count on, put students and the University in a difficult position last year. Despite funding for 2016 recently coming through, we must continue to manage the budget conservatively with the situation in Springfield remaining dire and 2017 MAP funding commitments from the state in question. To improve results of our operations this current fiscal year and beyond, we have tasked the vice presidents and deans with identifying cost-containment strategies as well as revenue growth initiatives. We are planning ahead so this can be done thoughtfully and strategically.

Staffing News
Please see below for several important leadership updates:

  • Marianne P. Ryan, PhD, has been appointed the new dean of University Libraries by Interim Provost Patrick Boyle, PhD. Dr. Ryan, who is currently the associate university librarian at Northwestern University, will join Loyola libraries in September.
  • Active dean searches are underway for the School of Law and the School of Social Work. In May, Linda Brubaker, MD, current dean of the Stritch School of Medicine, announced her plans to transition out of the leadership role on December 31, 2016. A search will begin soon for Dr. Brubaker’s successor.
  • The interim leadership plan for the John Felice Rome Center has evolved after much discussion with President-elect Rooney. On July 1, Michael J. Garanzini, S.J., our chancellor, stepped in to the role of interim director of the John Felice Rome Center. Father Garanzini has deep knowledge of the Rome Center and I anticipate a seamless transition for all who work and study at the center. An active search led by Thomas Regan, S.J., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, is underway for a full-time leader.
  • Steve Bergfeld, senior vice president for our Health Sciences Division, left the University on July 1 to accept a position with The Ohio State University as vice president for development. Steve’s contributions over the years are many, including his strategic role in reinvigorating the University, serving as a key advisor and liaison during the sale of the hospital to Trinity Health, and building an important relationship with Loyola University Health System. I thank Steve for his many years of service to Loyola.

Diversity and Inclusion
I am pleased to report that the campus climate survey is moving forward, as faculty and staff focus groups are set to begin today, July 26. Additional focus groups will take place at the start of the fall semester (in August) and will include students, faculty, and staff. This is an important step in our work to engage the campus community and ensure that we are providing a diverse and inclusive environment. We remain committed to fostering respectful dialogue to further understanding, learning, and personal growth, and as we have seen over the course of the past couple of months, our world is greatly in need of this dialogue. As we continue to mourn for those who lost their lives in recent tragedies, I ask that you also consider the impact of these events on your colleagues and peers. Please support one another, and, if needed, take advantage of the resources available to students and employees of Loyola.

Chris Manning, PhD, will continue to serve as an advisor to me on race and diversity issues. He will serve as assistant provost for academic diversity and begins this role on August 1. He will also remain an important member of the Executive Council on Diversity and Inclusion.

“Plan 2020” Activity
There has been much progress on the University’s strategic plan. All together, we have approved or launched eight new “Plan 2020” projects, including the launch of Lake Shore Community Partners, Loyola Community and Family Services, the Center for Translational Research and Education, and the Center for Criminal Justice Research, Policy, and Practice. More than 140 students will soon complete their first year at Arrupe College and we have received more than 1,000 applications for an anticipated 180 additional enrollments this fall. A new faculty development initiative focusing on advancing the Jesuit humanistic tradition will also launch in the fall. To date, we have committed more than $650,000 to fund projects out of the plan’s budget for this past fiscal year and future years. Most importantly, we have aligned institutional leadership performance goals with the plan to help drive implementation and are reviewing metrics that will help us assess the success of each priority area.

Before we welcome President-elect Rooney, I want to take a moment to thank each of you for your support and ongoing commitment during the past year. Even in a year of transition, we have made good progress as a university focused on its future. I look forward to resuming my role as provost and leader of Academic Affairs. I want to thank my colleague Patrick Boyle, PhD, who stepped in and has served as interim provost since January. His steadfast leadership of our academic mission allowed me to focus my full attention on serving as your interim president.

I hope that you are enjoying your summer and taking some time to refresh and relax in anticipation of another active and productive academic year. I also hope to see many of the faculty and staff at our Feast of Saint Ignatius Mass and picnic this Friday at the Lake Shore Campus.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Diversity and Inclusion Progress and Future Goals

May 4, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

The end of the academic year provides a time for celebration, and we will do so at Commencement in less than a week. It is also a time to reflect on our many accomplishments, progress, and—as importantly–our challenges.

In January I pledged that we would spend the semester listening to and learning from each other. We committed to addressing issues together, making progress with the understanding that we needed to take a long view and collaboratively foster justice and community across the institution.

Thanks to your commitment to Loyola, our collective work on “Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World,” and a spirit of respectful dialogue throughout the semester, I am happy to report progress on a number of fronts. Together, we have moved Loyola University Chicago forward. Progress in several key areas is detailed here:

Student Recruitment and Retention—The addition of an associate director for multicultural student recruitment and the creation of the Students of Color Ambassador Group are already paying off through increased attention in highly diverse high schools. We have also initiated focus groups with African-American students in Chicago Public Schools to help us further our efforts. A new peer-to-peer program, “Connect to Loyola,” has matched nearly 60 African-American admitted students with 39 current Loyola students. Our already popular overnight multicultural visit program saw increased demand this year, necessitating additional visit days. These strategic efforts, along with the awarding of additional institutional aid, have led to a 23 percent increase in freshmen admits and deposits from African-American students. In Arrupe College, our student retention rate is currently 91 percent, and we will welcome 180 new students—out of more than 1,000 applicants—in the fall.

Support and Community—Throughout the semester, I have participated in listening sessions with students, faculty, and staff of color. You have been candid and I have gained perspective on several issues of concern. I know there is room for support beyond the successful Achieving College Excellence program and Men and Women of Color initiatives. The Council for Student Success, Division of Student Development, and many other offices will continue to seek ways to better support our campus community. For example, the Office of the Provost is adding a diversity component to its orientation process for new faculty that will provide these individuals with background on diversity issues at Loyola and didactic, hands-on information to engage these issues on campus and in the classroom.

Earlier this year, hundreds of us attended the annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebrations on campus to take part in impactful Black Lives Matter discussions with the co-founders of the movement. In April our graduate students organized their own Black Lives Matter conference on the Water Tower Campus. We will continue to facilitate these important dialogues around complex global and local issues. Our discourse has been healthy and respectful, and the revised demonstration policy announced earlier this year is another strong example of an improvement that supports our goals: the free exchange of ideas, respectful debate, and understanding through communicating differing views and opinions via our system of shared governance.

Academics and Cultural Fluency—The Core diversity working group has met with student representatives five times this academic year to discuss diversity in our Core offerings, most notably within the knowledge areas of history, theology, and literature. Proposals to add more culturally diverse classes to Tier 1 and increase the number of sections of diverse courses in Tier 2 of the Historical Knowledge Area are moving forward. Conversations continue on increasing diversity offerings in other areas of the Core. We will have more to report in the new academic year, as proposals will be presented to the Board of Undergraduate Studies during the fall 2016 semester. I anticipate any changes that are approved to be effective as early as fall 2017. In the meantime, as these structural adjustments develop, we have begun an inventory of all classes related to diverse topics being taught across the University so students will be empowered to add these classes to their studies.

On the University 101 (First-Year Seminar) front, a cultural competency component will be in place for fall 2016. Lastly, recruiting and retaining more diverse faculty remains an important goal and is being advanced through revised recruitment strategies under the direction of the academic deans. At present, 38 new faculty members who represent diversity, including eight African-American faculty, have accepted a position to begin teaching at Loyola this fall.

Understanding Our Climate—As shared recently, the campus climate assessment process is underway. A kick-off meeting with Willis Towers Watson helped define goals, project scope, participant groups, timing, survey administration, and reporting. A climate assessment task team will oversee the process. Focus groups will be conducted with students, faculty, and staff throughout the rest of the spring, summer, and in early fall. An online survey will be administered in September 2016 with results expected to be delivered to University leaders near the end of the fall semester. I expect the results to be formally rolled out to the campus community near the end of January 2017 and the spring semester will be used to work with you on the action-planning phase.

Website and Council—I encourage you to visit our Diversity and Inclusion website. We are continuing to build out this important site by creating repositories of information, adding resources and contact information, providing event and programming listings, and sharing profiles and news. On the site you will find our new diversity statement, which describes who we are as a University to internal and external audiences. It reflects alignment with our Jesuit heritage and mission, along with the value we place on diversity and inclusion. You will also find the names of members from the Executive Council on Diversity and Inclusion. This group has been instrumental in developing our diversity statement and working with campus leadership to move the diversity and inclusion discussion forward. They played an important role at our recent leadership retreat and are responsible for guiding the diversity efforts of Loyola moving forward. If you have recommendations or feedback to share with the Executive Council on Diversity and Inclusion, please submit your comments through the website so a council member can follow up with you directly.

As I reflect on the year, I am pleased with how far we have come by working together. We talk a lot about our Jesuit, Catholic mission and the outcomes we strive to achieve locally and globally. From reflecting on national movements for these important topics to addressing diversity and inclusion issues in meaningful ways at our own institution, we have learned and grown through many difficult and fruitful conversations this year. Academic institutions are where these important, and often uncomfortable, conversations need to take place. Your voices have been heard and more action is ahead.

I hope your summer provides time to relax and rejuvenate after this productive year. Thank you for your partnership and ongoing good-faith efforts to improve our community for the benefit of all.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Culmination of the Academic Year

April 14, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

We have much to celebrate as we prepare to wrap up another successful academic year. Beginning today, student achievement is front and center at our sixth annual Weekend of Excellence. On April 22 we will officially unveil the new Center for Translational Research and Education in Maywood with an open house for students, faculty, and staff. And next month we will host our 146th Commencement for approximately 4,000 graduates. I also want to update you on several important matters affecting our work and community.

#MAPMatters Campaign
Program funding remains an issue in Springfield. The February #MAPMatters campaign, which many of you participated in, generated an estimated 100,000 contacts to Governor Rauner’s office. To maintain momentum, a second effort is underway and students across Illinois will travel to the State Capitol on April 20 to urge legislators and the governor to pass the MAP budget. Please contact your Illinois state representatives to let them know how important MAP is, and consider signing our online petition. You can learn more at LUC.edu/mapmatters.

Diversity and Inclusion
We continue to have much dialogue around diversity and inclusion on campus. On Tuesday, I hosted a retreat with my Cabinet, the Council of Deans, and members of the Executive Council on Diversity and Inclusion to discuss their perspectives and our overall goals. We would like to develop a process to prioritize actions moving forward. Regarding other progress: 1) The University’s diversity statement, an important effort by the recently appointed diversity council, is now available online; 2) We have selected Willis Towers Watson as our vendor partner for the upcoming climate survey. We will conduct focus groups to start the process soon; 3) University 101 revisions are underway and a cultural competency component will begin in fall 2016; 4) Faculty members continue to seek opportunities to expand the Core Curriculum to enable students to access more diverse content. In the coming weeks I will share a full summary of activity around diversity and inclusion.

“Plan 2020” Progress
Last Friday we celebrated the launch of Lake Shore Community Partners, an innovative partnership model that will build on our existing relationships with the Rogers Park and Edgewater neighborhoods. Thank you to everyone who was able to join us for the ribbon-cutting ceremony. This major initiative represents our commitment to engage local societal challenges through partnerships.

On April 26 a “think tank” discussion will be held at the Health Sciences Campus, bringing our health sciences researchers and local public health officials together to identify solutions for community health disparities.

We also continue to receive funding requests to support “Plan 2020.” One recent request is centered on priority two and focused on designing and implementing an ongoing professional development program to engage faculty more deeply with the University’s Ignatian heritage. I am pleased to see so many Loyolans committing to the plan’s success.

Leadership Transitions
Lastly, I want to highlight some important leadership transitions:

  • Justin Daffron, S.J., vice president for advancement, will be leaving Loyola University Chicago on May 13 at the request of the provincial of the Central and Southern Province of the Society of Jesus. I have asked Jamie Orsini, the current associate vice president, to lead the division until a successor has been identified.
  • In February David Yellen, JD, our School of Law dean, was named president of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. Michael Kaufman, JD, associate dean for academic affairs, will serve as the interim dean of the law school beginning July 1.
  • After nearly nine years leading the Rome Center, Emilio Iodice plans to transition to the role of director emeritus. On July 1, G. Ted Bohr, S.J., assistant professor of art history and theology, will step in as acting director.
  • Our University Libraries dean, Robert Seal, MLS, will retire from his position on June 30. Fred Barnhart, MLS, JD, associate dean for library services and collections, will serve as the interim dean beginning July 1.

Extensive national and international searches will be conducted for these critical positions. I want to thank Justin, David, Emilio, and Bob for their commitment to Loyola, and I wish them all the very best.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

An Easter Message

March 23, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

This week is a special and sacred time of year for many in our community. Tomorrow, we begin the Easter Triduum with Holy Thursday. All are invited to gather with fellow Loyolans to rejoice in this season of hope and renewal at Madonna della Strada Chapel for Holy Week and Easter liturgies.

As a diverse religious institution, members of our campus community will also participate in a number of other faith-based celebrations in the coming weeks. Regardless of your faith tradition or beliefs, I invite you to join me in taking a moment to reflect and give thanks for our Loyola community and for the unique gifts and opportunities that we have received.

While we consider all that we have to be grateful for, please remember in a special way those who have lost their lives in tragic terrorist attacks this month in Belgium, Turkey, and other parts of the world. Events like these remind us that our educational mission of promoting peace and understanding across the globe is as important as ever.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Proposed Demonstration Policy Review Period

February 23, 2016

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

As you may recall, in December we placed a moratorium on three sections of our Demonstration and Fixed Exhibit Policy, housed within the University’s Community Standards. Since then, we have gathered input from students, faculty, and staff and have been reviewing the policy so that it better reflects our values and needs as an institution.

I want to thank the University Senate, Student Government of Loyola Chicago, and the Division of Student Development for their work on this initiative and for the thoughtful recommendations they provided. I also want to thank everyone who attended the University Senate open forum, Senate meetings, or simply made their voice heard by reaching out to those involved with the review process. The dialogue has been constructive and respectful and has allowed us to arrive at the proposed Student Free Expression: Demonstration and Fixed Exhibit Policy that I want to share with you today.

Key updates to the policy include:

  • Demonstration approval is no longer required. Organizers are encouraged to notify the Office of the Dean of Students two days before the demonstration; however, formal approval to move forward is no longer necessary.
  • Indoor demonstrations are now recognized and may occur in two locations on our lakeside campuses—Damen Student Center and Terry Student Center—as long as they don’t impede building traffic.
  • Outdoor demonstrations can be held throughout campus and are no longer limited to the Damen North Lawn.
  • Amplified sound is permitted during outdoor demonstrations if used in a manner that does not substantially interfere with classes or other events on campus.
  • Under the policy, demonstrations and fixed exhibits—regardless of the content or viewpoints expressed—are permitted so long as they are orderly, lawful, and congruent with policies within the Community Standards.

To view the proposed policy, please click here.

Given the level of importance of this initiative, I want to provide the campus community with some additional time to consider this policy change before it is finalized. Please provide any feedback by Tuesday, March 15, 2016. At the end of this three-week window, we will review any comments we receive before finalizing the policy.

Feedback can be sent to Jane Neufeld, the vice president for student development, at studentdevelopment@luc.edu. Thank you again for your attention and collective efforts as we work to finalize a demonstration policy that better allows our students to express their views in a safe and timely manner.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Listening and Improving

February 10, 2016

Dear Loyola Faculty and Staff,

Earlier this week at the State of the University addresses, I followed up on the results of the SEIU Local 73 election, in which a majority of the College of Arts and Sciences full-time non-tenure-track and part-time faculty who voted opted for union representation. I also provided an update on the recent election involving IUOE Local 399 and our skilled maintenance staff and the current petition by SEIU Local 73 to organize members of our English Language Learning Program.

As I have said all along, we respect the rights of our employees to organize, and we will work with both unions to move toward a collective bargaining agreement contract for each group.

Our faculty members are the key to providing a transformative education and fulfilling our educational mission. To learn more about what is most important to faculty and what we can collectively do better to serve our students, I have been regularly meeting with faculty to listen to feedback. I want to thank those who have shared their thoughts on what is working well and what needs improvement. I will continue to hold these meetings, and I know that listening works when action is the outcome. Together, we will identify meaningful ways to address the top concerns.

I have encouraged each school dean to host similar listening sessions and to collect as much information as possible about the issues and concerns of their faculty. We are fortunate to have you—top-tier educators, researchers, professionals, and advocates for student learning—to carry out our special educational mission.

I look forward to the upcoming faculty receptions scheduled for each campus, and hope that you will be able to stop by to share your thoughts on how we can continuously improve Loyola University Chicago. Please invite a colleague to join you.

Faculty Receptions

  • Lake Shore Campus—Monday, February 15; 4—6 p.m.; Mundelein Center, Palm Court, 4th Floor
  • Water Tower Campus—Tuesday, February 16; 4—6 p.m.; Schreiber Center, Wintrust Hall, 9th Floor
  • Health Sciences Campus—Monday, February 29; 4—6 p.m., Cuneo Center Atrium

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Tuition Information for Academic Year 2016-17

February 9, 2016

Dear Student,

I am writing to share information regarding tuition and fees for next academic year, and to give details regarding the considerations that went into the approval of new rates.

We recognize that a college education is one of the largest investments a family can make, and we are grateful for having the opportunity to serve you. The University's Board of Trustees carefully scrutinizes our financial resources and strategic investments to be sure that tuition is priced fairly and competitively with other private colleges. For several years, we have had tiered tuition in which incoming classes paid a larger tuition increase of about 5 percent, while continuing students typically saw increases of about 2.5 percent. This tiered pricing, with a smaller increase for continuing students, was intended to acknowledge that our already-enrolled students would not be able to take advantage of the many new campus classroom facilities, residence halls and dining, plus student activity and athletic venues that were under construction during their enrollment at Loyola. With construction on the Water Tower and Lake Shore campuses nearly complete, all students are benefiting from the new facilities and other investments we have made these past many years.

The Board of Trustees has approved tuition and fees for the 2016—2017 academic year. In order to maintain the quality of our academic programs, invest in strategic priorities, and provide a small cost-of-living salary increase to our faculty and staff, an increase of 4 percent has been approved for undergraduate tuition in 2016—2017. Room rates will increase by an average of 2.5 percent, and full-time student development fees will increase by 4.6 percent. These increases will go into effect beginning with the fall 2016 semester. We strive to keep your tuition and fees at levels that provide the highest quality education possible, delivered by a world-class faculty in state-of-the art, sustainable facilities.

I would like to share a few factors that were considered in our tuition and fees increase decision. Salaries are our largest expense because we do our best to attract and retain the best faculty. For example, this academic year, we hired 55 new full-time faculty members in a variety of disciplines. We brought new staff on board to advance our goals to diversify the University, invest in new academic programs such as Engineering Science, and expand academic and career services, as well as campus safety. Loyola also continues to provide significant financial aid for our students, increasing support by $9 million this year, which is over $152 million in financial aid given annually to students.

We are committed to being good stewards of tuition funds, and to delivering a college education that is high quality, affordable, and accessible for students and their families. You have my best wishes for a successful spring semester, and I thank you for being a valued part of the Loyola community. For additional details about tuition, fees, and room rates for the 2016—2017 academic year, please visit LUC.edu/bursar.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

MAP Funding Update: Contact Governor Bruce Rauner

February 8, 2016

Dear Students,

As you know, the State of Illinois’s student financial aid program (MAP) has not yet been funded for this current year. Loyola has included MAP grant awards in the financial aid packages for all qualifying students, but without the state’s funding we won’t be able to continue for much longer. Nearly 2,400 of our students depend upon their MAP grants to attend Loyola each year, including many of you. And nearly all of our Arrupe College students are able to attend only thanks to their MAP grants.

There is finally a chance that the State of Illinois will pass a budget for MAP grants. The Illinois General Assembly has passed Senate Bill (SB) 2043, which fully funds MAP grants at $397 million. We understand that it will be sent to Governor Rauner on February 16.

The governor has indicated that he will veto the bill, however, so we are asking all of our students—whether you receive a MAP grant or not—to contact Governor Rauner and ask him to sign SB 2043 and fund MAP grants.

Join the #MAPMatters Campaign
February 9, Twitter Tuesday

  • Tweet the Governor @BruceRauner, and ask him to sign SB 2043.

February 10, Website Wednesday

  • Voice your opinion in support of MAP funding on the governor’s website.

February 11, Telephone Thursday

  • Call the Governor’s Office at 312.814.2121 or 217.782.0244.

February 12, Facebook Friday

When you contact the Governor’s Office, please share this simple message: “Governor Rauner, please fund MAP and sign SB 2043.”

If you do receive a MAP grant yourself, I also encourage you to share your own personal story with the governor. Let him know how important MAP grants are as you pursue your education at Loyola.

This is a statewide campaign, and you will be joining thousands of other Illinois students from colleges and universities all around the state.

There are several events being planned to support MAP:

Friday, February 12, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

  • Join us in the Damen Student Center at Lake Shore Campus or the Terry Student Center at Water Tower Campus to advocate for MAP and enjoy some hot chocolate.

Tuesday, February 16

  • Rally in downtown Chicago and Springfield, Illinois. Please contact Loyola’s Vice President for Government Affairs, Phil Hale, at phale@luc.edu for more information.

If you have any questions about MAP or this advocacy effort, please contact Phil Hale. Details are also available at LUC.edu/mapmatters.

Thank you for your help!

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

MAP Funding Update: Contact Governor Bruce Rauner

February 8, 2016

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As you know, the State of Illinois’s student financial aid program (MAP) has not yet been funded for this current year. Loyola has included MAP grant awards in the financial aid packages for all qualifying students, but without the state’s funding we won’t be able to continue for much longer. Nearly 2,400 of our students depend upon their MAP grants to attend Loyola each year. And nearly all of our Arrupe College students are able to attend only thanks to their MAP grants.

There is finally a chance that the State of Illinois will pass a budget for MAP grants. The Illinois General Assembly has passed Senate Bill (SB) 2043, which fully funds MAP grants at $397 million. We understand that it will be sent to Governor Rauner on February 16.

The governor has indicated that he will veto the bill, however, so we are asking members of the Loyola community to contact Governor Rauner and ask him to sign SB 2043 and fund MAP grants.

Join the #MAPMatters Campaign:
February 9, Twitter Tuesday

  • Tweet the Governor @BruceRauner, and ask him to sign SB 2043.

February 10, Website Wednesday

  • Voice your opinion in support of MAP funding on the governor’s website.

February 11, Telephone Thursday

  • Call the Governor’s Office at 312.814.2121 or 217.782.0244.

February 12, Facebook Friday

When you contact the Governor’s Office, please share this simple message: “Governor Rauner, please fund MAP and sign SB 2043.”

This is a statewide campaign, and you will be joining thousands of supporters from colleges and universities all around the state. There is also an on-campus event being planned to support MAP:

Friday, February 12, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

  • Join us in the Damen Student Center at Lake Shore Campus or the Terry Student Center at Water Tower Campus to advocate for MAP and enjoy some hot chocolate.

If you have any questions about MAP or this advocacy effort, please contact Loyola’s Vice President for Government Affairs, Phil Hale, at phale@luc.edu for more information. Details are also available at LUC.edu/mapmatters.

Thank you for your help!

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Spring 2016 State of the University Addresses

January 26, 2016

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff,

The Loyola community is invited to attend Interim President Dr. John P. Pelissero's State of the University addresses on Monday, February 8, at the Water Tower Campus, and Tuesday, February 9, at the Lake Shore Campus. Details of both events can be found below.

For those who are unable to attend one of the events below, we will be live streaming the Lake Shore Campus address via the University’s website. Click here to access the page where the live stream will occur.

Water Tower Campus
Monday, February 8
11 a.m. – Remarks and Q&A
Noon – Reception
Corboy Law Center, Kasbeer Hall, 15th Floor

Lake Shore Campus
Tuesday, February 9
4 p.m. – Remarks and Q&A
5 p.m. – Reception
Sullivan Center for Student Services, Galvin Auditorium

Health Sciences Campus
Thursday, October 1
4:00 p.m. – Remarks and Q&A
5:00 p.m. – Reception
John and Herta Cuneo Center, Tobin Hall

Anyone with questions about these events can contact the Office of the President at 312.915.6400.

Sincerely,

Office of the President

Dialogue on Diversity - Respect the Conversation

January 21, 2016

Dear Loyola Faculty and Staff,

Happy New Year, and welcome back to the beginning of the spring semester after what I hope was a refreshing break.

Earlier this week, I sent a message to our students responding to the concerns they have–and we share–about the need to make Loyola a more diverse and inclusive institution. These important issues require a collaborative and sustained effort to address them in meaningful ways. 

We begin this semester with a renewed focus on listening to each other in order to create an environment that promotes, encourages, and supports diversity. As a Jesuit, Catholic university, we are committed to welcoming an open exchange of ideas and fostering respect and understanding, especially when discussing and debating complex issues. In that spirit, we will center much of our communication and attention this spring on the theme Respect the Conversation. Our ambition to build a more just, humane, and sustainable world is the centerpiece of our new strategic plan, “Plan 2020,” and that effort must begin on our campuses and with our students.

I have asked Christopher Manning, PhD, an associate professor in our history department, undergraduate program director, and a longtime faculty member who is very familiar with our mission at Loyola, to join the President's Cabinet this semester and to serve as an advisor to me, and a liaison with students and the faculty, regarding diversity issues. Dr. Manning will help us think critically about how we can address the needs of students of color on our campuses.

Over the break, Winifred Williams, PhD, our vice president for human resources and chief diversity and inclusion officer, Dr. Manning, and others created a new Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola website. This site is designed to serve as a valuable resource for students and our entire University community and includes information pertinent to our diversity and inclusion goals, services, programming, and opportunities to get involved in this important work. If there are events, resources, or services in your area that relate to diversity, but which are not yet linked to, or included on this website, please let Lorraine Fitzgerald (lsnyde2@luc.edu) in my office know so that we can include that information.

I hope you will be able to attend the State of the University addresses in early February, which will include an update on these issues. The Water Tower Campus address will take place on Monday, February 8, from 11 a.m. to noon (Corboy Law Center, Kasbeer Hall) and the Lake Shore Campus address will be held on Tuesday, February 9, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. (Sullivan Center, Galvin Auditorium). For those who cannot attend one of these addresses in person, we will be live streaming the Lake Shore Campus event. More details on the live stream will be communicated in the coming weeks.

We are looking forward to a busy semester and to working closely with our faculty and staff to ensure a transformational experience for our students.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Diversity Efforts on Campus

January 19, 2016

Dear Students,

Happy New Year, and welcome back after what I hope was a refreshing and enjoyable holiday season and time with family and friends. I want to start the year off with a message of renewed commitment to creating an environment that treasures our diversity by both respecting our differences and celebrating our collective goal of a better University community and society for all. I envision a semester of listening to and learning from each other, addressing issues together, making progress, and fostering justice.

To that end, this first note of the new year is in response to concerns shared with me, and others, last month by a group of students–the Loyola Black Voices. They have stated, and I agree, that Loyola should, and can, do more to ensure better access, resource allocation, and support of minority students on campus. I share this goal, as do our University trustees, leaders, and faculty and staff. What we heard are complex issues; issues that our city, and the nation, continue to grapple with. As a Jesuit, Catholic institution, we are the perfect place for these conversations to occur and we will take action through our strategic plan, “Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World.” 

This note provides updates related to what we are doing in a number of areas that were highlighted by Loyola Black Voices as issues of particular concern. I want to emphasize that these are important issues not just for our African-American student population but for all students of color and all students who identify with a minority group, including first-generation students.

African-American Student Recruitment - The Undergraduate Admission Office will continue its commitment to increase the number of African-American and minority students recruited to attend Loyola. Last fall, Undergraduate Admission conducted focused recruitment in the City of Chicago, including participating in more than 70 events at high schools that have large populations of students of color. This spring, the office is hosting a multicultural overnight program and is launching a peer-to-peer program for admitted students to connect with current students of color. These ongoing efforts require a sustained focus.

Financial Challenges of African-American Students - The Admission Office is also working closely with the Office of Financial Aid to develop merit and grant awards that will attract a diverse student body. Our goal is to ensure our aid packages are competitive with other institutions and that they will support enrolled students through graduation. Loyola implemented revised award processes, which enabled us to enroll the most ethnically and racially diverse class in the history of Loyola last fall with 42 percent of our incoming freshmen identifying as students of color and a 47 percent increase in our African-American student population this academic year. We will continue to diversify and support our student population.

Retention and Success of African-American Students - Our academic leaders, along with the Council for Student Success and the Division of Student Development, are collaborating to increase the retention rates for all of our students, but most especially for students of color. Institutional programs such as Achieving College Excellence and the Men and Women of Color initiatives have helped increase our student retention rate to 86 percent of freshmen and 87 percent of African-American students last year. We will continue to grow our individual mentoring programs and focus on additional opportunities to help minority students succeed.

Core Curriculum Program Modifications - The Board of Undergraduate Studies is working closely with undergraduate deans, department chairs, and the Core Curriculum director to diversify our curriculum. Also, discussions with students regarding the Core, which began last semester, will continue. Modifications to University 101 content to address cultural competence and diversity awareness are being made and will be instituted for the 2016–2017 academic year. Additionally, the University Core Curriculum is being reviewed with the goals of identifying courses that address diversity and determining where we need to add diversity courses. Understanding and promoting diversity is an embedded value of the Core, and faculty administrators will continue to engage students in conversations to make progress in this area.

Classroom and Facility Expansion - The Arnold J. Damen, S.J. Student Center was built to offer students a welcoming, state-of-the-art environment for student activities, services, and amenities. The Student Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Office, as well as the Black Cultural Center, have space within Damen. Additionally, there are multiple large and small spaces within the center for meetings, as well as larger, reservable venues for programs. We will continue to be mindful about maintaining safe spaces for students to gather.

Climate Survey - Winifred Williams, PhD, vice president of human resources and chief diversity and inclusion officer, has created an Executive Council on Diversity and Inclusion to map out a strategic direction to increase diversity and enhance inclusion at Loyola. This Council includes administrative, academic, Jesuit, and student leaders. Initial goals include developing a diversity statement for the University and conducting a campus climate survey regarding the experiences and concerns of all students on campus, including students of color and any students who feel they are marginalized in any way. The Council, which has solicited outside vendors to conduct the survey, expects to launch the survey by March 1. We will share updates on the survey in the coming weeks. 

Additionally, I have asked Christopher Manning, PhD, an associate professor in our history department and a longtime faculty member who is very familiar with our mission at Loyola, to join the President’s Cabinet this semester and to serve as an advisor to me, and a liaison with students and faculty, regarding diversity issues. Dr. Manning will help us think critically about how we can meaningfully address the needs of our students of color. 

Over the break, Dr. Williams, Dr. Manning, and others created a new Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola website. We hope the site will be a valuable resource for students and our entire University community with content on our diversity and inclusion goals, services, programming, and opportunities to get involved in this important work. It is a work in progress and we welcome perspectives and input from students on its usefulness and ways we can enhance the site.

There are three upcoming events that I hope you will attend. On Friday, January 22, the University Senate will hold a public forum from 3–4:30 p.m. in the Damen Student Center (Sr. Jean Schmidt, BVM, MPR South) for the community to discuss the future of Loyola’s student demonstration policy. Recommendations will be reviewed by the full Senate at its February meeting. Please attend the forum and share your ideas so that our policy reflects our shared goals of respectful, safe, and timely on-campus demonstrations.

The University will host multiple events to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr. On Wednesday, January 20, the Health Sciences Campus will welcome Linda Rae Murray, MD, MPH, to campus to discuss “Challenging Institutional Racism: Reflections of a Modern Day ‘Shero.’” Click here for details.

On Wednesday, January 27, you are invited to attend the annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration on the lakeside campuses. This year’s celebration features the co-founders of #BlackLivesMatter—Opal Tometi, Alicia Garza, and Patrisse Cullors. We welcome them to campus to discuss the national movement to address and eradicate racism on college campuses, including our own. For full details of the celebration, click here

In addition to asking me to address several issues, which are updated in this letter to you, Loyola Black Voices requested a general timeline on progress Loyola will make by the year 2020. As you know, we are currently conducting a search for the next president of Loyola. I believe we will build on the momentum of the fall and make significant progress toward our shared goals this semester. It will be incumbent upon the next University president to continue to address diversity and inclusion issues, and to map out a plan for furthering our institutional progress on all we achieve this semester.

While this note is long, I want it to fully report on the progress we are making, and will continue to make. I ask you to respect our conversations–many of which will be difficult–that we will have throughout the semester. We know there are no simple solutions to complex problems and we will lean into critical thinking, as it is a tenet of our educational mission and central to our Jesuit, Catholic heritage. I view the work ahead as an opportunity–and a responsibility–to create positive change and build community on campus, in Chicago, and beyond.

I hope you have a great start to your semester.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

A Christmas Message

A Christmas Message

December 15, 2015

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

As we move into this third week of Advent, and with the conclusion of Hanukkah last night, I would like to wish you and your family a very blessed Christmas and holiday. During this holy season, and in the wake of unfathomable violence in our city and in our world, we rededicate ourselves to the work of building bridges of understanding, trust, and peace in our communities and beyond.

I look forward to seeing you at the University Christmas Reception on Friday, December 18, from 1:00-4:00 p.m. on the Lake Shore Campus in the Damen Student Center. This event is a special opportunity to gather with colleagues and friends, and together enjoy some holiday revelry, including a visit by Santa Claus. I hope you will join us at this year’s reception.

Lastly, I invite you to enjoy a year-in-review photo gallery and the University's Christmas video that will be sent to Loyola alumni and friends this month. You can find the photo gallery and video here.

Sincerely, 

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Interim Provost Transition

December 10, 2015

Loyola Community,

I am writing to let you know that Interim Provost Samuel Attoh, PhD, will be on medical leave beginning January 1. Sam’s service as interim provost for the lakeside campuses these past six months, and his tenure before that as dean of The Graduate School and associate provost for research, has been marked by tremendous innovation, commitment to excellence, and collaboration across departments, schools, and campuses. Significantly, for nearly two years, Sam co-chaired the Strategic Planning Committee, which conducted the University-wide consultations that formed the basis for "Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World." We are grateful to Sam for his many contributions to Loyola over the past decade, and we wish him a full recovery so that he may rejoin his friends and colleagues here at the University.

I have asked Patrick Boyle, PhD, vice provost for academic centers and global initiatives, to serve as interim provost beginning January 1. As interim provost, Patrick will oversee the work of the deans and directors who lead our schools, institutes, centers, libraries, and research at the lakeside campuses; student affairs, working alongside the Office of the Vice President for Student Development; enrollment management; and academic and faculty support services. He will also continue to oversee the University’s global initiatives and serve on the President’s Cabinet.

Patrick joined Loyola as a faculty member in the Department of Political Science in 1992. He has undertaken a series of progressively important roles in academic administration since 2003 when he joined the Provost’s Office as director of the Office for International Programs. Since 2013, Patrick has led the University’s international efforts as vice provost for academic centers and global initiatives. Patrick’s global initiatives efforts at Loyola include expansion of study abroad participation to more than a third of the undergraduate population; the creation of an international immersion program for faculty and staff; support for the development and management of the University’s campus in Rome and centers in Beijing and Ho Chi Minh City; and the realignment of programming for international students, most recently through the creation of the Chicago Center at Loyola University for international study abroad students.

Patrick also oversees our five Centers of Excellence and the University’s academic student services. He served as co-leader of the team that designed, organized, and integrated student services for Loyola students into one location—the Sullivan Center for Student Services—and supervised its operations. Patrick serves on several standing committees of the University, including the Strategic Plan Implementation and Steering Committee, the Behavioral Concerns Team, the Council for Student Success, the Board of Undergraduate Studies, the Council of Deans, and the Academic Committee of the Loyola University Chicago Board of Trustees.

Please join me in supporting Patrick as he transitions into his new role.

Sincerely, 

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Moratorium on Demonstration Policy

December 8, 2015

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff,

I hope you had a chance to read the note that was sent to all students, faculty, and staff on Saturday, December 5. The e-mail provided an update on some of the steps we are taking to improve our campus culture and experience for the entire community. In the note, I shared that the University Senate and Student Government of Loyola Chicago have shown an increased interest in reviewing the University’s demonstration policy. These important members of our shared governance system will make recommendations on the policy, along with Student Development. University leadership supports this process.

While the current policy is being reviewed, a moratorium is now in place on sections one, two, and three of the Demonstration and Fixed Exhibit Policy, which includes a total of four sections. To view the policy, and its specific sections, please click here and go to pages 60 and 61. All other policies stated in the Community Standards remain in effect. I want to emphasize that Loyola seeks a campus that is respectful, orderly, free from harassment and bias, and safe for every member of our community.

In addition, there has been much constructive dialogue in the last few weeks and it will continue well into the New Year. I am confident we will advance our shared goal of an increasingly invigorating and productive campus. In particular, I encourage students to engage in discussion with University leaders, faculty, and peers. A commitment to understanding and personal growth comes from the process of sharing perspectives and listening to various opinions.

I hope you will agree that this moratorium is—simply put—a good-faith effort by our University to take the necessary steps together, as Ramblers, towards a policy that more accurately reflects our values and needs as an institution.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Embracing Our Challenges

December 5, 2015

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff,

Three weeks ago I sent a letter in regards to our campus community’s gathering on the Lake Shore Campus, which demonstrated solidarity with students from the University of Missouri and highlighted concerns on our own campuses regarding the need to do a better job recruiting, retaining, and supporting a diversity of students at Loyola. In my communication, I assured you that University leaders would respond to student concerns raised that day, and to move this initiative forward I asked faculty and staff members representing Student Development, Human Resources, and the Office of the Provost to meet directly with concerned students.

Since that charge, student groups and University leaders have met regularly, including a meeting that I had with students representing Loyola Black Voices on Friday evening. Our Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Bob Parkinson, also joined us in the meeting to listen to the concerned students. At these meetings, a number of topics have been discussed, including our recruitment strategies for attracting a greater number of faculty members and students of color, suggestions for broadening the Core Curriculum to include courses on Black history, the ongoing review of the demonstration policy, the inclusion of cultural competence in UNIV 101 courses, and more. This kind of engaged, respectful dialogue and debate is a central component of our Jesuit educational mission, and together I believe that we can, and will, make Loyola an even better institution.

Looking ahead, the continued commitment of our students, faculty, and staff is critical to making meaningful improvements to our campus culture and the experience of all Loyola students. It is timely and appropriate that the first institutional priority of our new strategic plan, "Plan 2020," is focused on leveraging our University resources to ensure student access and success. The establishment of successful programs like ACE (Achieving College Excellence) and Arrupe College of Loyola University Chicago is, I hope, just the beginning of our progress here. In consultation with students, faculty, and staff who have been engaged in these important conversations, we intend to focus on the immediate next steps below.

Climate Survey—Winifred Williams, PhD, our vice president for human resources and chief diversity and inclusion officer, will spearhead an effort to launch a campus climate survey on the topic of race this spring. She is currently reaching out to other institutions who have successfully completed similar survey projects and she and her team will be engaging with a third-party survey vendor to assist with implementation. We hope to have this effort launched in early February.

Detailed Report—Student leaders have asked the University to provide a detailed update on how we will move the campus race conversation forward by late January. In the next month, I will be working directly with the University leaders who have been engaged in this process to determine next steps and I commit to providing an update to the entire Loyola community at the start of the spring semester.

I also want to take this opportunity to address the questions that many of you have asked regarding the conduct process and the organizers of the November 12 demonstration. In recent days, the University Senate and Student Government of Loyola Chicago, important members of our shared governance system, have shown an increased interest in revising the current demonstration policy. In light of this new development, and my interest in getting the campus community to focus its attention solely on the important steps ahead, the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution, with my support, is dismissing the conduct charges of the student organizers.

As we near the end of the fall semester, I encourage everyone to take some time to enjoy the upcoming break with family and friends. In January, it will be important that we move forward on these initiatives so that together we can build on the momentum of our discussions to the betterment of our entire University.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

A Thanksgiving Message

November 24, 2015

Dear Members of the Loyola Community,

I am writing to extend my wishes for a happy and healthy Thanksgiving holiday to you and your family. Thanksgiving offers us a special opportunity to remember, and to be grateful for, all that we have received.

Our University boasts talented students, dedicated faculty and staff, and committed trustees, regents, and friends whose shared commitment to our mission has made this past year one worthy of many thanks. Our mutual concern for increasing, supporting, and welcoming a diversity of students, and for hosting a variety of perspectives on campus regarding issues facing our country is central to our commitment to be a campus community that embodies Jesuit values through open dialogue and mutual respect. We will continue to convene meetings with students and other University stakeholders to discuss these important issues so that together, we can defeat bigotry in all its disguises and more fully embrace the values that make ours a supportive campus and community.

We pray in a special way this month for all who have been impacted by global terrorism, forced migration, and all forms of inhumane treatment inflicted on fellow human beings. We join women and men around the world who work for justice and peace, and we are renewed in our commitment to impart a message of hope and healing to the next generation.

As we move into the holiday season, we are happy again this year to partner with Catholic Charities for our Loyola Gives program. Each year this program offers critical support to help hundreds of families in Chicago obtain winter clothing and other vital necessities. Information on the program, and how you can contribute, is available on the Loyola Gives website. Thank you for your generosity to these families.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Moving Loyola Forward

November 12, 2015

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff,

This afternoon, members of our campus community gathered on the East and West quads to stand in solidarity with students from the University of Missouri and participate in a national movement to discuss, and fight, racism focused on black students. Those gathered also stated their desire for Loyola to further address the needs of students of color and to recruit more students of color.

I am proud of our community’s response and the commitment to addressing issues of justice. Loyola welcomes students, faculty, staff, and visitors from different perspectives, identities, cultures, and backgrounds and celebrates the free exchange of ideas, which is at the heart of a Jesuit education.

During today’s demonstration, a group of students visited the Office of Student Development to deliver a list of concerns related to their experience on campus as students of color. I can assure you that University leaders have received the list, we want to hear more, and we will respond to these concerns. Student leaders, the Office of Student Development, the Office of the Provost, and Human Resources will collaborate to advance this campus conversation. I will work with them in the coming weeks to see that the momentum created today continues.

As in all instances, while we welcome a diversity of opinions and perspectives, we expect dialogue to be respectful, and we expect our Community Standards to be upheld. In the last 24 hours, students have referred to some inflammatory, anonymous comments on social media sites like Yik Yak. I want to emphasize that our community has zero tolerance for all hate-filled, racist comments, and I can assure you that anyone, whether student or employee, found responsible for these comments will be subject to the University’s conduct process.

Thank you to everyone who continues to strive to make Loyola University Chicago and our larger community a just and safe world for all. Exploring complex societal issues like racism is a worthy and commendable pursuit for our University. You will hear more from administration in the coming days about next steps in advancing this conversation.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Honoring Our Ignatian Heritage

November 4, 2015

Dear Loyola Community,

On Monday, November 16, we will mark the 26th anniversary of the assassination of the Universidad Centroamericana (UCA) martyrs—six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and the housekeeper's daughter. This year, we will present an inaugural Martyrs Award to the Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants, which is responding to the needs of migrants and refugees from El Salvador and Latin America. The suffering of these people is rooted in many of the same structural injustices to which the martyrs responded. The work of the Interfaith Committee reminds us of the way to which we are the direct heirs to, and responsible for, the ongoing mission of the martyrs.

Loyola honors the Salvadoran martyrs each year because in their lives and deaths, they exemplify the Jesuit and Catholic ideals and values that we seek to emulate, such as solidarity with the poor, working for social justice, and courageously witnessing to the truth. The annual Martyrs Award will honor a worthy faith-based organization or individual with a $25,000 prize in commemoration of the UCA martyrs and in support of the University's commitment to advancing social justice. In early 2016, the University community will be invited to submit nominations for next year's awardee. A committee will be formed to review the submitted nominations and to recommend awardees to the Dean's Council each year.

This month's award ceremony will take place on our Lake Shore Campus, in the Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, BVM, Multipurpose Room, 2nd floor, Damen Student Center, from 3:30—5:00 p.m. At this event, a panel of Loyolans will reflect on their efforts to live out the Jesuit mission in light of issues related to immigration and the struggles of undocumented people. After the panel discussion and award ceremony, there will be a memorial Mass in Madonna della Strada Chapel at 5:15 p.m., followed by a reception beginning at 6:00 p.m. in McCormick Lounge. Information on the award ceremony, as well as other programs organized during Ignatian Heritage Month, can be found at LUC.edu/IHM.

I hope you can join us at this inaugural Martyrs Award event on November 16 to honor the work of the Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants, and in support of all who work for social justice.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Board of Trustees Meeting Highlights

September 25, 2015

Loyola Community,

Last week was a busy and important one on the Water Tower Campus as we celebrated the grand opening of the John and Kathy Schreiber Center on Tuesday, September 15. The day’s festivities included a multi-hour, live WGN-AM radio broadcast from the Center lobby, a CEO Summit with top civic and corporate leaders of Chicago, and a spectacular evening gala that featured a keynote address from General Colin L. Powell, USA (Ret.), as well as remarks from Mayor Rahm Emanuel, among others. The following day, our Board of Trustees gathered for its quarterly meeting. Below are some of the highlights from the meeting.

Celebrating “Firsts”—This fall, our total enrollment is at an all-time high, with 16,077 students calling Loyola home, including the most undergraduates in our history (10,719). Our work to implement and engage students in the Four-Year Experience is paying off, as our freshman to sophomore retention rate has risen to 86 percent (best in three years) and we have retained 80 percent of our transfer students (best in 25 years). Arrupe College welcomed nearly 160 students in August to begin their associate’s degree programs, and our new Engineering Science program launched with 35 freshmen. I reported that for the first time in its history, Loyola was named a Top 100 national university in U.S. News & World Report’s latest rankings (#99) of best colleges. This was due to the work of many people and departments here at the University who lead our efforts to improve the quality of the undergraduate educational experience, diversify the student body and create a campus culture of inclusion, and transform our facilities to meet the needs of today’s students.

Strategies and Trends—As higher education becomes increasingly competitive, it is important to understand the industry trends and continue to innovate. At the Board of Trustees meeting, Paul Roberts, associate provost for enrollment management, and Rob Munson, senior vice president for finance and chief financial officer, presented the Trustees with an extensive look at the University’s undergraduate enrollment trends, financial aid strategies and related implications, and lessons we have learned that will guide future planning.    

New Faces—Three new members of the Board of Trustees were introduced:  John P. Fitzgibbons, S.J. (PhD ’93); Rocco J. Martino (MBA ’78); and Joseph T. Seminetta (BBA ’86). Dr. Julie H. Sullivan was also elected to the Board of Trustees. Loyola alumna Margaret Faut Callahan (BSN ’74), CRNA, PhD, FNAP, FAAN, was elected and introduced to the Trustees as the new Health Sciences Division Provost.

Research and Collaboration—Trustees were provided with an update on the construction status of the University’s Center for Translational Research and Education, which will be completed next month on the Health Sciences Campus. Full occupancy of the research labs and centers will occur in spring 2016. We are excited for the opening of this joint research enterprise with the Loyola University Health System, which will advance the health sciences research enterprise in demonstrable ways.   

The academic year is off to a busy and exciting start. Much of our focus this year will be on implementing our new Strategic Plan, “Plan 2020:  Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World,” which I will talk about in more depth at next week’s State of the University addresses at each of our three Chicagoland campuses. I hope that you will join me at those events.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Take the It’s On Us Pledge

September 16, 2015

Loyola Students,

As we embark on this new academic year, I invite you to join me in participating in the It's On Us campaign, which addresses and prevents gender-based violence. Loyola University Chicago is committed to the health and safety of all members of our community, and this campaign is an important way for all of us to be part of the solution rather than bystanders to the problem.

The It's On Us program is designed to frame sexual assault in a way that reminds us that it is our responsibility to speak up, or step in, to prevent it. We are all responsible for ensuring that our residence halls, clubs, sports teams, social gatherings, and our campuses, as a whole, are safe environments, free from sexual assault. As students, faculty, and staff here, it's on us to make that happen.

We are committed to preventing sexual assault, sexual harassment, and other forms of gender-based violence, and to uphold our promise to care for ourselves, each other, and our community. In the coming weeks, you will receive information regarding events to raise awareness of these issues and programs to engage our campus community in how best to meet the needs of our students in both responding to, and preventing, gender-based violence.

Please be reminded that there are resources and reporting options on campus and off campus that are available to all students. Loyola's confidential Sexual Assault Advocacy Line staff are available to assist you from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays and 24/7 over the weekends at 773-494-3810, and the Chicago Rape Crisis Hotline is an additional resource and can be reached at 888-293-2080.

Please join me in taking the pledge to participate at ItsOnUs.org. I hope you each have a safe and happy year here at Loyola.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Fall 2015 State of the University Address Dates Announced

Fall 2015 State of the University Addresses

The John and Kathy Schreiber Center, the new home of Loyola’s Quinlan School of Business, prior to a ribbon cutting and building blessing ceremony on August 27, 2015.

September 1, 2015

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff,

The Loyola community is invited to attend Interim President Dr. John Pelissero’s State of the University addresses on Wednesday, September 30, and Thursday, October 1.

Water Tower Campus
Wednesday, September 30
11:30 a.m. – Remarks and Q&A
12:30 p.m. – Reception
Lewis Towers, Regents Hall, 16th Floor

Lake Shore Campus
Wednesday, September 30
4:00 p.m. – Remarks and Q&A
5:00 p.m. – Reception
Sullivan Center for Student Services, Galvin Auditorium

Health Sciences Campus
Thursday, October 1
4:00 p.m. – Remarks and Q&A
5:00 p.m. – Reception
John and Herta Cuneo Center, Tobin Hall

For those who are unable to attend, a recorded version of the Lake Shore Campus remarks will be available on Loyola Media approximately one week after the address. Anyone with questions about these events can contact the Office of the President at 312-915-6400.

Sincerely,

Office of the President

A New Year, A New Strategic Direction

A New Year, A New Strategic Direction

Arrupe College of Loyola University Chicago held its first day of class in Maguire Hall, on the Water Tower Campus, on August 17, 2015.

August 18, 2015

Loyola Community,

I hope you have been able to take some time to gather with family and friends this summer to rejuvenate and relax. As we look forward to the beginning of the academic year, we are readying our campuses to welcome more than 2,200 new freshmen (our third largest class), 500 transfer students, and over 1,800 new graduate and professional students. We also officially opened the doors of Arrupe College yesterday and welcomed 159 associate degree students. We are grateful for the hard work of our enrollment management team and the many faculty and staff members who have collaborated in these efforts.

As in past years, there was much work done to renew and ready our campuses over the summer. The new Father Damen sculpture memorial was installed on the south end of the West Quad last week and is sure to become a popular place to greet fellow Loyolans on the Lake Shore Campus. A dedication ceremony for the sculpture will be held August 23 at 4:30 p.m. We also opened a new Alumni House on Winthrop Avenue that I encourage you to visit. Downtown, we are looking forward to the official opening of the Schreiber Center, which will house our Quinlan School of Business at the Water Tower Campus. At the Health Sciences Campus, the new Center for Translational Research and Education is nearly complete and will be fully operational in spring 2016.

This academic year promises to be a busy one as we embark on implementation of the University’s new Strategic Plan, “Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World,” which was adopted by the Board of Trustees in June. "Plan 2020" details our four institutional priorities for the next five years: leveraging University resources to ensure student access and success; advancing our social justice mission through faculty development; promoting multidisciplinary collaboration to address societal challenges; and engaging local and global societal challenges through partnerships. A Strategic Plan Steering Committee will be spearheaded by Susan Malisch, VP and CIO, Information Technology Services, and will include members from across our lakeside and Health Sciences Division campuses. We will be sending information to the University community in the coming weeks regarding opportunities to contribute to, and be involved with, our strategic planning efforts this fall. I hope that you will join in this important institutional-wide effort. "Plan 2020" and the list of the current committee members is online at LUC.edu/strategicplanning.

This Friday, August 21, everyone is invited to join in an official welcome for our new undergraduate students at the New Student Convocation, which will take place in Gentile Arena at 4 p.m. The annual Convocation Walk will precede the event at 3 p.m. and I encourage you to participate. The University community is also invited to Mass of the Holy Spirit, which will take place on August 23 at 5 p.m. in the Gentile Arena, and on August 27 at 11:30 a.m. on the Health Sciences Campus in the SSOM building atrium. We hope you will join us for these special events this month.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President

Continuing the Momentum

Continuing the Momentum

Miguel Ramirez (left), a psychology major, Mulcahy Scholar, and Provost Fellow, discusses his presentation with Dr. Pelissero in the Mundelein Auditorium during the Weekend of Excellence Undergraduate Research and Engagement Symposium on April 18, 2015.

July 8, 2015

Dear Loyola Community,

Last Tuesday was an important day for Loyola University Chicago. After 14 years of inspirational leadership that transformed this University, Father Garanzini stepped down as Loyola’s president to become chancellor. The next day, on July 1, I assumed the role of interim president of Loyola, while my colleague, Samuel Attoh, PhD, stepped into the role of interim provost.

I am committed to continuing the momentum and building on the already strong position of Loyola both in Chicago and beyond. Today, I want to provide you with an update on my priorities for the University and our recent reaccreditation process.

Building on the growth and stability provided by Father Garanzini, my first order of business is to introduce the community to our new strategic plan ("Plan 2020: Building a More Just, Humane, and Sustainable World")—which was approved by the Board of Trustees in June and will roll out this fall. Other priorities include maintaining the University’s solid financial position, ensuring a strong enrollment plan for the next academic year, attending to the key University internal and external stakeholders, and communicating regularly with all of you to ensure clear understanding of priorities and to share updates. Between the fall launch of the strategic plan, welcoming and orienting nearly 5,000 new undergraduate, professional, and graduate students, the opening of Arrupe College this month, the start of our engineering science program, the September opening of the Schreiber Center, and the spring 2016 opening of our Center for Translational Research and Education in Maywood, we have a busy year and a lot to look forward to.

I am also pleased to announce that the Higher Learning Commission’s Institutional Actions Council (IAC) recently met to review the findings of the comprehensive evaluation of Loyola that took place earlier this spring. The IAC concurred with the findings and voted to continue our accreditation, with the next Reaffirmation of Accreditation scheduled for 2024–25. In addition, the IAC also concurred with positive evaluation findings for Loyola’s distance education offerings, affirming the approval of Loyola’s online courses and programs. Hundreds of members of the University community—faculty, students, staff, administrators, trustees, and alumni—contributed to this effort via the Commission’s new Pathways accreditation model. We are grateful to all involved for your time, talent, and commitment to improving the high quality Jesuit education we deliver to our students.

Thank you to everyone for making this leadership transition a smooth process. This fall, our chairman of the Board of Trustees, Robert L. Parkinson Jr., will communicate the necessary details, timelines, and ways that the campus community can engage in the presidential search process.

I am grateful to Father Garanzini for his exemplary leadership and the many years of mentoring he has provided me. I am prepared for this opportunity, and I look forward to working with all of you to advance Loyola University Chicago. I hope that each and every one of you had a restful and relaxing Fourth of July holiday. Please enjoy the remainder of your summer, as we prepare for the launch of another successful academic year.

Sincerely,

John P. Pelissero, PhD
Interim President