Loyola University Chicago

Neuroscience

Courses

BIOL/PSYC 202 (Introduction to Neuroscience)
Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or PSYC 101.

This course will introduce students to basic concepts and the variety of topics in the field of neuroscience, including neuroanatomy (gross and cellular), physiology, neural basis of behavior, malfunctions due to disease and injury, and methods used to study these areas; laying a foundation for advanced coursework in neuroscience.

Outcomes: Knowledge of the organization of the nervous system, cellular events that underlie emotions, learning, and behavior, and awareness of classical and modern methods for advancing the field.

PSYC 382/BIOL 284 (Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience)
Prerequisites: PSYC/BIOL 202
Overview of topics and methodologies used in behavioral and cognitive neuroscience including: attention, learning and memory, language, reasoning, decision making, intelligence, emotions, social cognition, and consciousness.

 Outcomes: Students will understand theories regarding brain mechanisms, underlying mental events and the technologies used for studying these mechanisms.

BIOL 362 (Neurobiology)
Prerequisites: PSYC/BIOL 202; BIOL 251, PHYS 111, PHYS 111K, or PHYS 125; PHYS 111L or 125L: PHYS 112, PHYS 112K, or PHYS 126; PHYS 112L or 126L

The purpose of this course is to introduce major principles and concepts of modern neurobiology. An emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the electrophysiology of the neuron and the manner in which groups of neurons are organized into functional nervous systems sub-serving sensory, motor or integrative functions.

PSYC 306 (Research Methods in Psychology)
Prerequisites: PSYC 304
Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic principles of scientific research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology. This class is writing intensive.

Outcomes: Students will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to formulate research questions and hypotheses, develop research designs, operationalize variables and gather data in an ethical manner, choose appropriate statistical methods for analyzing data, interpret results of statistical analyses, write a scientific paper in APA style, and critically evaluate research.

COMP 150 (Introduction to Computing)
The world overflows with electronic data.  This course introduces programming in a simple, powerful language like Python, with selection, repetition, functions, graphical effects, and dynamic interaction with the Internet, plus connections to lower level computer organization and computer implications in the wider world.

Outcome:  Empowerment to manage and transform masses of data; understanding of technical, societal, and ethical issues involved.

 

COMP 170 (Introduction to Object-oriented Programming)
Co- or Pre-requisites
: either COMP 163 or 150, or prereq Math Placement Test or Math 117

This programming intensive course with its weekly lab component introduces basic concepts of object-oriented programming in a language such as Java.

Outcome:  Ability to take a problem, break it into parts, specify algorithms, and express a solution in terms of variables, data types, input/output, repetition, choice, arrays, subprograms, classes, and objects; ability to judge a good program.

PSYC/BIOL 240 (Psychology and Biology of Perception)
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or BIOL 102.
Introduction to the study of sensory systems, especially vision and audition, emphasizing historical development of the field, multi-disciplinary scientific approaches; recent research and theory on the mechanisms of seeing and hearing; and applications of research to real-world problems.

Outcomes:  Students will understand and be able to explain how knowledge of the functioning of sensory systems is obtained using a variety of experimental methods, how stimulus energy is translated into neural signals, how the brain processes sensory information, and how these processes determine conscious perception.

NEUR 300 (Seminar in Neuroscience)
Prerequisites: PSYC 101, BIOL 102 and BIOL/PSYC 202 (Introduction to Neuroscience). Enrollment restricted to Neuroscience majors and minors.

The seminar introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of modern neuroscience with an emphasis on the various neuroscience research activities that take place at Loyola University Chicago, and reviews current neuroscience research topics.

Outcomes:  Students will demonstrate understanding of the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary nature of modern neuroscience, and the research questions and experimental approaches used at the Lakeshore and Medical Center campuses.

PSYC 250 (Cognition)
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, object recognition, memory, attention, language production and comprehension, reasoning and problem solving.

Outcomes: Students will understand and be able to explain how knowledge about mental events is obtained using a variety of experimental methods, discuss current empirical research and theories of cognition, understand well-established cognitive theories about attention, memory, language processing, reasoning and decision-making.

ANTH/BIOL 320 (Animal Behavior)
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 or ANTH 103; or BIOL 102 and BIOL 112.This course is an interdisciplinary examination of animal behavior from the perspective of the anthropologist and biologist.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of biological bases of animal behavior, including the function and evolution of behavioral patterns.

COMP 386 (Computational Neuroscience)
Prerequisites: COMP 150 or COMP 170

Introduces computational methods to understand neural processing in the brain. Levels of representation from low-level, temporally precise neural circuits to systems-level rate-encoded models, to information-theoretic approaches. Emphasis on sensory systems, primarily vision and audition, most readily demonstrating the need for such computational techniques.

Outcomes: Appreciation that many aspects of neuroscience cannot be understood without appropriate mathematical or computational frameworks, and ability to adeptly apply these frameworks in the various domains of neuroscience.

PSYC 352 (Neuropsychology)
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 & PSYC/BIOL 202
Neuropsychology is the interdisciplinary study of the relation between human brain function and behavior. This course is an undergraduate survey of topics related to neuropsychology, including neuroanatomy, psychophysiology, and cognitive neuroscience. A primary goal of the course is to introduce undergraduate students to neuropsychological concepts in research and applied settings.

Outcomes: Successful completion of this course leads to mastery of CNS function and structure. The ability to integrate this information will allow students to develop and test hypotheses about brain-behavior relationships.

PHIL/PSYC 279 (Judgment and Decision Making)
Prerequisites: PHIL 130
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the principles of reasoning and decision-making.

BIOL 351 (Sleep and Circadian Rhythms)
Prerequisites: BIOL 251, BIOL 282, PSYC/BIOL 202

We will cover circadian rhythms one very prominent circadian-regulated behavior: sleep. We will investigate these topics at several different levels, spanning from cellular and molecular mechanisms to systems and behavioral approaches, and finally will look at pathologies of these systems that lead to human disorders.

Outcomes: Students will become familiar with a variety of model systems used to study circadian rhythms, and learn how to critically read primary literature and lead discussions of this reading.

BIOL 357 (Neural Diseases/Degeneration/Regeneration)
Prerequisites: BIOL 251, BIOL 282, PSYC/BIOL 202
This course offers an overview of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying common neurodegenerative disorders. Mechanisms of neuronal cell death and application of stem cells in CNS regeneration will also be covered. Students will learn by reading assigned background materials and research articles, and participating in class discussions.

Outcomes: Students will understand current advances of genetic, developmental, molecular, and cellular mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative diseases. Students will also learn how disease mechanisms affect neural function, cognition, and behavior.

BIOL  358 - Developmental Neurobiology
Prerequisites:  BIOL 251, 282
This course focuses on cellular and molecular underpinnings of the development of neuronal features of the nervous system. Topics include neural induction and subsequent differentiation events, regulation of neuronal survival, axon guidance, target selection, and synaptogenesis.

Outcome: Students will become familiar with principles of neural development and the studies that led to those principles. Students will also learn how to critically read primary research papers and present these papers to the class.

BIOL  366 - Cell Physiol & Biochem
Prerequisites:  BIOL 251 and CHEM 224
An introduction to biochemical principles as they relate to major biological  themes such as the relationship between cellular structure and function,  metabolism, thermodynamics, regulation, information pathways, and evolution. 

Outcome: Students will study the basic concepts of biochemistry and will understand how thermodynamics govern biochemical processes.  Catalytic strategies, as well as the major pathways of both anabolism and catabolism, will also be learned.

COMP  386 - Computational Neuroscience
Prerequisites: COMP 150 or COMP 170

Introduces computational methods to understand neural processing in the brain. Levels of representation from low-level, temporally precise neural circuits to systems-level rate-encoded models, to information-theoretic approaches. Emphasis on sensory systems, primarily vision and audition, most readily demonstrating the need for such computational techniques.

Outcomes: Appreciation that many aspects of neuroscience cannot be understood without appropriate mathematical or computational frameworks, and ability to adeptly apply these frameworks in the various domains of neuroscience.

BIOL  382 - Molecular Genetics
Prerequisites:  BIOL 251, 282 and CHEM 222 or 224
This course covers the molecular details of genetic processes such as DNA replication, RNA and protein synthesis, gene regulation and genome organization. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate a detailed understanding of (1) basic molecular techniques, (2) the macromolecules involved in genetic processes, and (3) published experiments that underlie our knowledge of these processes.

PSYC 311/BIOL 313 (Lab in Psychobiology)
Prerequisites:  Pre-requisites: (BIOL/STAT 335 or PSYC 304) and (PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC/BIOL 240, or PSYC 382/BIOL 284); or for PSYC-BS and Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience majors, PSYC 306 and (PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC/BIOL 240, or PSYC 382/BIOL 284)

Introduction to the structures and functions of vertebrate nervous systems, how these systems compute and process information; laboratory experience with concepts and methods in the neurophysiological study of the bases of perception and other behaviors. Hearing is used as an example.

Outcomes:  Students will learn the concepts of basic neurophysiology and the theory of signal detectability, and have experience applying the logic and formulation of neurophysiological theories of perception.

PSYC 314 (Lab in Experimental Psychology: Cognition)
Prerequisites: PSYC 250 and 306.
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing.

Outcomes: Students gain skills and experience in experimental design, measurement, statistical analyses, and report writing as they relate to research on human cognition.

PSYC 316 (Lab in Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception)
Prerequisites: PSYC 306 and either 240 or PSYC/BIOL 202
Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications to the psychophysical and physiological study of sensory systems. The course stresses the research methods and quantitative measures that are used in characterizing sensory processes, especially visual and auditory systems.

Outcomes: Students gain skills and experience in experimental design, measurement, statistical analyses, and report writing as they relate to research in sensory processes.

NEUR 301 (Lab in Neuroscience I)
Prerequisites: BIOL 362 and BIOL/PSYC 240 or BIOL 284/PSYC 382 and students must be either a Molecular/Cellular Neuroscience Major, a Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience major, or a Neuroscience Minor (Departmental Consent Required)

Students will be trained in various anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurobiological modeling techniques used to study the nervous system and the brain in the laboratory.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate understanding of several research designs and methodologies of use in neuroscience research and will gain experience with basic neuroscience laboratory techniques. Students will complete experiments as assigned and will be responsible for timely reports reflecting the outcome of a set of experiments.  In addition, students will learn to write scientific reports which will include tables and figure summaries of the experimental data collected.

BIOL 395L (Special Topics Laboratory—if Lab in Neuroanatomy).

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor

PSYC 397 (Independent Research)
Prerequisites: PSYC 306 and approval of internship coordinator and the supervising faculty member.  Limited to students with senior standing. A contract is required.

Capstone opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of a psychology faculty member. Only one of PSYC 397 and 399 may count toward the psychology major. To earn credit towards the Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience major, the project must have a cognitive/behavioral neuroscience focus and should be supervised by a cognitive/behavioral neuroscientist.

Outcomes: Students will gain experience in all aspects of psychological research, including literature review, formulating hypotheses, designing and conducting research, analyzing data and interpreting results, communicating the results of research in written reports.

PSYC 369/370 (Honors readings and Honors Research)—2 semesters, 6 credit hours total.
Prerequisites: membership in the psychology honors award program or in the college honors program and approval of the department honors advisor. To earn credit towards the Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience major, the project must have a cognitive/behavioral neuroscience focus and should be supervised by a cognitive/behavioral neuroscientist.

PSYC 369: Directed readings and development of a formal research proposal on a topic of interest to the student and the faculty member with whom he/she has chosen to work. Students are not restricted to working with the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes.

Outcomes: Students will write a literature review and research proposal for the honors thesis.

PSYC 370: Prerequisites: PSYC 369.

Students carry out the research proposed in PSYC 369 and prepare a formal report constituting the honors thesis. Approval of the thesis by the honors committee earns the psychology honors award. PSYC 370 is a capstone course. 

Outcomes: Students will conduct research, analyze and interpret data, and write a thesis.

Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience Capstone

PSYC 387 (Seminar in Behavioral & Cognitive Neuroscience)
Prerequisites
:  PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC/BIOL 240, PSYC 382/BIOL 284.

Lecture/discussions will focus on issues central to behavioral neuroscience, emphasizing human and animal mental processes and neural information processing mechanisms. Students will read primary research papers and practice analytical skills in class discussion and presentations. Presentations and exams will promote critical thinking and a general understanding of current issues in behavioral and cognitive neurosciences.

Outcomes: Students will become familiar with principles of cognitive and behavioral approaches to the study of the neural bases of behavior. Students will also learn how to critically read primary research papers and present these papers to the class.

NEUR 301 (Lab in Neuroscience I)
Prerequisites: BIOL 362 and BIOL/PSYC 240 or BIOL 284/PSYC 382 and students must be either a Molecular/Cellular Neuroscience Major, a Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience major, or a Neuroscience Minor (Departmental Consent Required)

Students will be trained in various anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurobiological modeling techniques used to study the nervous system and the brain in the laboratory.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate understanding of several research designs and methodologies of use in neuroscience research and will gain experience with basic neuroscience laboratory techniques. Students will complete experiments as assigned and will be responsible for timely reports reflecting the outcome of a set of experiments.  In addition, students will learn to write scientific reports which will include tables and figure summaries of the experimental data collected.

BIOL 313/PSYC 311 (Lab in Psychobiology)
Prerequisites:  Pre-requisites: (BIOL/STAT 335 or PSYC 304) and (PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC/BIOL 240, or PSYC 382/BIOL 284); or for PSYC-BS and Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience majors, PSYC 306 and (PSYC/BIOL 202, PSYC/BIOL 240, or PSYC 382/BIOL 284)

Introduction to the structures and functions of vertebrate nervous systems, how these systems compute and process information; laboratory experience with concepts and methods in the neurophysiological study of the bases of perception and other behaviors. Hearing is used as an example.

Outcomes:  Students will learn the concepts of basic neurophysiology and the theory of signal detectability, and have experience applying the logic and formulation of neurophysiological theories of perception.

BIOL 366L (Lab in Cell Physiology and Biochemistry)
Co- Pre-requisites:  BIOL 366 or CHEM 361
Introduction to modern techniques and instrumentation with an emphasis on cellular metabolism and protein biochemistry including purification and quantitation methods and enzyme kinetics.

Outcomes: Proficiency in performing a variety of biochemical assays and the ability to write up results as a formal lab report.

BIOL 367 (Bioimaging)
Prerequisites: BIOL 251 and 282;  PHYS 112 or 114;  Instructor Permission.
This course focuses on light microscopy but also includes a section on Electron Microscopy. Topics include basic optical theory, history, sample preparation, microscope operation, digital image acquisition and analysis.

Outcomes: Students will become adept at producing publication quality images using a variety of imaging techniques. Students will also learn how to correctly interpret results and properly present their data.

BIOL 390 (Molecular Biology Laboratory)
Prerequisites:  BIOL 251, BIOL 282, BIOL 283 and CHEM 222 or CHEM 224

This course is an intensive laboratory course in the basic principles and techniques of molecular biology, including bacterial cloning, polymerase chain reaction, restriction mapping, agarose gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing. 

Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate basic molecular biology skills including manipulation of bacterial cultures and DNA, plasmid minipreps, gel electrophoresis, cloning, polymerase chain reaction, and other molecular techniques that may be specific to their chosen independent projects.

 

To earn credit towards the Molecular/Cellular Neuroscience major, independent research projects (BIOL396/397h/398/CHEM 300) must involve molecular/cellular methods to a significant degree.  If the project is molecular/cellular but not supervised by a neuroscience faculty member in Biology, the student must prepare a 1-2 page single spaced document discussing the relevance of the methods to the study of the nervous system and the relationship of the project to issues in molecular/cellular neuroscience. This should be emailed to the director of the Molecular/Cellular track prior to the beginning of the BIOL396/397h/398/CHEM 300 (or final independent research) semester—earlier is better if you are not confident that your research is applicable to neuroscience. Further, you must enroll for a minimum of 3 credit hours, and at least one prior semester of work in that lab is required.

BIOL 396 (Research), BIOL 397H
Prerequisites: BIOL  296 and Permission of Biology Department and Instructor.
Laboratory or field research under faculty guidance emphasizing hypothesis testing, literature searches, experimental design, and use of appropriate techniques.

Outcome: Students will learn the full set of research skills required in doing an independent project and reporting the results.

BIOL 398 (Internship in Biology)
Prerequisites:  Permission of Instructor; Contract required, note additional requirements above.
A supervised field placement intended to give students training or work experience in aspects of biology that cannot be obtained on campus.

Outcome: Students will acquire practical experience in biology-related job settings.

BIOL 398 (Internship in Biology)
Prerequisites:  Permission of Instructor; Contract required.
A supervised field placement intended to give students training or work experience in aspects of biology that cannot be obtained on campus.

Outcome: Students will acquire practical experience in biology-related job settings.

CHEM 221 (Organic Chemistry I)
Prerequisites: CHEM 102 & CHEM 112 OR CHEM 106

A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for chemistry majors covering structure and bonding in organic molecules; nomenclature, chemical and physical properties and reactions of non-aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers; stereochemistry and conformational analysis; and spectroscopy.

Outcome:  Students will understand the chemical behavior of organic molecules and the mechanisms of reactions.

CHEM 223 (Organic Chemistry A)
Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or CHEM 106

Lecture and discussion course for non-chemistry majors surveying nomenclature, structures, properties, stereochemistry, reactions, mechanisms, and syntheses of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers.

Outcome:  Students will identify classes of organic compounds and typical reactions, discriminate amongst intermediate stabilities, postulate reaction mechanisms, plan multi-step syntheses, and analyze/interpret spectroscopic data.

CHEM 222 (Organic Chemistry II)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 221. Chemistry majors only

A lecture, discussion and laboratory course for chemistry majors continuing from 221 covering nomenclature, properties, reactions, syntheses, and spectroscopy of further classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, carbohydrates and other polyfunctional compounds. 

Outcome:  Students will be able to assign IUPAC names, spectroscopically identify, prepare, and propose reactions for these groups.

CHEM 224 (Organic Chemistry B)
Prerequisites:  CHEM 223 or CHEM 221

The second semester lecture and discussion course of a two semester sequence, a continuation of 223 for non-chemistry majors emphasizing the organic chemistry of conjugated systems, aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

Outcome:  Students will identify classes of organic compounds and typical reactions, discriminate amongst intermediate stabilities, postulate reaction mechanisms, plan multi-step syntheses, and analyze/interpret spectroscopic data.

BIOL 376 Capstone Seminar in Molecular/Cellular Neuroscience
Prerequisites: BIOL 251, BIOL 282, and BIOL 362
This lecture/discussion will span the molecular underpinnings of development, synaptic plasticity, regeneration, hormonal regulation and disease-affected circuitry.  Students become familiar with principles of molecular/cellular approaches to the study of the nervous system. Students also learn how to critically read primary research papers and present these papers to the class.

Outcomes: Students will become familiar with principles of molecular/cellular approaches to the study of the nervous system. Students will also learn how to critically read primary research papers and present these papers to the class.