November

Ignatian Heritage Month

St. Ignatius of Loyola encouraged his followers to seek God in all things, to serve those in need, and to become people for others. His mission can be seen in everything we do at Loyola—through students, faculty, staff, and our alumni. Learn more about events in November and what Loyolans are doing every day to live out his call to serve others.

Exploring our Legacy

Join the Loyola family as we celebrate, investigate, discuss, and deepen the powerful legacy of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Read an introduction to Ignatian spirituality and Ignatian Heritage Month from Loyola President Jo Ann Rooney, JD, LLM, EdD. Read more


Calendar of events

November 2
CATHOLIC MINDS, CATHOLIC MATTERS LECTURE SERIES — With Father Ian Boyd

3:30–5:30 p.m. • Coffey Hall, McCormick Lounge

November 3
IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA SCREENING

11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. • Damen Cinema

November 5
MASS OF REMEMBRANCE

5 p.m. • Madonna della Strada Chapel

November 6
IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA SCREENING

3–5 p.m. • Damen Cinema

November 7
IGNATIAN HERITAGE MONTH FALL BOOK CLUB

Noon–1:30 p.m. • Corboy Law Center, Room 727

HOLOCAUST RESCUERS–OVERCOMING EVIL

2:30 p.m. • Information Commons, 4th floor

SOCIAL CLASS DINNER

6–8 p.m. • Coffey Hall, McCormick Lounge

November 8
IGNATIAN HERITAGE MONTH FALL BOOK CLUB

Noon–1:30 p.m. • Health Sciences Division Library, Room C

SOCIAL CLASS DINNER

6–8 p.m. • Coffey Hall, McCormick Lounge

POVERTY SIMULATION

6–9 p.m. • Centennial Forum, Rambler Room

VOICES BEYOND THE WALL SCREENING

6 p.m. • Damen Cinema

November 9
PIERRE TEILHARD DE CHARDIN, S.J., LECTURE SERIES — With Uwem Akpan

3–5 p.m. • Coffey Hall, McCormick Lounge

IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITY SERIES FOR HEALTH SCIENCES FACULTY AND STAFF

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. • Cuneo Center/Stritch, Koller Alumni Center 196

November 10
BUST IT FOR JUSTICE

7–9 p.m. • Damen Student Center, The Den

November 11
POVERTY SIMULATION

9 a.m.–Noon • Cuneo Center/Stritch Atrium

SECOND ANNUAL SOCIAL JUSTICE FORUM

9 a.m.–3 p.m. • Schreiber Center, Wintrust Hall

BREAKING OF THE FAST

4–7 p.m. • Damen Student Center, Sister Jean Multipurpose Room

November 13
COUNTING TIME LIKE PEOPLE COUNT STARS — Friends of the Loyola Libraries Speaker Series with Spencer Reece

6:30 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. program • Information Commons, 4th floor

IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA SCREENING

7–9 p.m. • Damen Cinema

November 14
"A RADICAL FAITH: MAURA CLARKE AND TRANSFORMATIONAL JUSTICE" SYMPOSIUM

1:30–3 p.m. • Information Commons, 4th floor

AGAPE LATTE

7 p.m. • Damen Student Center, The Den

November 15
IGNATIAN HERITAGE MONTH FALL BOOK CLUB

Noon–1:30 p.m. • Cuneo Hall, Room 410

November 16
MARTYRS AWARD PRESENTATION

4 p.m. • Cuneo Center/Stritch 360

MARTYRS AWARD MEMORIAL MASS

5:15 p.m. • Cuneo Center/Stritch Atrium

SHUTTLES TO HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS

Lake Shore Campus departs at 2 p.m.
Water Tower Campus departs at 2:30 p.m.

To reserve a seat, please e-mail Chris Murphy at cmurph3@LUC.edu.

November 29
CATHOLICISM: CALLED TO TRADITION OR REVOLUTION — With Mike Martinez, S.J.

7–8:30 p.m. • Damen Student Center, The Den (students only)

The Martyrs Award

This year, Loyola presented its Martyrs Award to the Quinn Community Center. Working in Maywood and Broadview, Illinois, the center offers community and education programs for all ages. The award, now in its third year, honors the slain Salvadoran martyrs and their commitment to service and social justice.

Meet the Loyola Community

Find out what a Jesuit education means for those who live it every day.

Meet the Loyola Community

Find out what a Jesuit Education means for those who live who live it every day.

“You can make more impact doing 100 small things than doing one big thing.”
– Daniel McGowan (BS ’88)
Watch video
“I was able to become a student, an activist, a researcher, a mentor—and it’s been one of the greatest experiences I’ve ever had.”
– Cristina Rodriguez (BA '17)
Watch video
“We are working toward social justice because of our faith, and those two go hand in hand.”
– Father James Prehn, S.J.
Watch video
“You’re not always doing the change; you’re helping empower people to make changes for themselves.”
– Candace Musick (BSW ’08, MSW ’09)
Read story
“I tell my students, ‘Let’s go out. Let’s make this course one that takes us to different parts of the city.’”
– Héctor García Chávez, PhD
Read story
“People say at the end of the day it is just a job. But in keeping with my Jesuit upbringing, this is my calling.”
– Clarisse Mendoza (JFRC Spring ’05, BA ’06)
Watch video
“I believe there's more work to do.”
– Theresa Dear (MUND ’90, MSIR ’99)
Read story
“Social justice is actually at the heart of who we are, and we need to step up and speak up.”
– Sister Norma Pimentel (MA ’95)
Watch video
“You realize that you can touch and impact more than just one patient at a time—through teaching other students, residents, and nurses.”
– Andrew Trotter (MD ’07)
Read story
Living out loud

While the month of November often brings to mind images of falling leaves and the Thanksgiving holiday, members of the Loyola community are gearing up for Ignatian Heritage Month, a monthlong celebration that highlights the living legacy of St. Ignatius. What exactly does that mean though? Watch the video to see how we live our mission every day of the year.

Hunger week

For more than 40 years, this weeklong event has raised awareness and funds for local, national, and global organizations fighting hunger. Learn more about the student-run activities and programs planned.

How Jesuit are you?

Test your knowledge of the Society of Jesus, Loyola history, Jesuit terms, and education.


What year was the Society of Jesus formed?

1540. St. Ignatius and six fellow students at the University of Paris first pronounced religious vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in 1534, but the order was formally recognized by the Catholic Church in 1540.

What does cura personalis mean?

Care for the entire person. Cura Personalis is a Latin phrase that is considered a hallmark of Ignatian spirituality and centers on the belief that each individual is a unique creation of God.

When Loyola was founded, what was the official name of the University?

St. Ignatius College. Founded in 1870 by Arnold Damen, S.J., St. Ignatius College was originally located at 413 W. Twelfth St., Chicago. Today it’s the site of St. Ignatius College Prep, and its official address has changed to 1076 W. Roosevelt Road.

Which of these are a central goal of a Jesuit education?

To form men and women for and with others. To graduate students who are open to growth. To provide a broad basis of knowledge that encourages students to seek more and find God in all things. (All of them are true, of course!) Education is one of the most important aspects of the Jesuit mission, and these are just a handful of its core tenets.

How many Jesuit saints are there?

53. St. Ignatius was canonized in 1622. 52 additional Jesuits have followed him into sainthood, including other Jesuit university namesakes Aloysius Gonzaga and Francis Xavier.

What does magis mean?

More or better. The term, which challenges us to strive for generous excellence, refers to the Jesuit philosophy of doing more for Christ and other human beings in everyday life.

When was the tradition of holding the Convocation walk through the Cudahy Library’s green doors started?

2009. The Convocation walk through Cudahy Library’s green doors is actually a new tradition for students. It started in 2009 to help build community among first-year students.

How many Jesuit universities exist in the United States?

28. Among Jesuit universities located across the United States, Loyola has the largest undergraduate population.

Along with educating the students of Loyola University Chicago, the Jesuits are responsible for the education of all but one of the following individuals:

Liam Neeson. Though he is not Jesuit educated, he sent both his children to Jesuit schools.

Which one of these inventions is the Jesuits credited with creating?

Trapdoor. Jesuits are famous educators with a long history of being proponents of the arts, and they created trapdoors for school plays in the 15th and 16th centuries.

What is Loyola’s motto?

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam. It means: for the greater glory of God. This is also the motto of the Society of Jesus. It insinuates that everything done is for God’s glory and to make the world a better place.

A closer look at the Martyrs Memorial

To honor the eight Salvadoran martyrs, Loyola built a memorial on campus in 2010. The structure, which curves along the sidewalk on the northwest side of Madonna della Strada Chapel, contains the names of each of the victims. These are the stories behind those names.

IGNACIO MARTÍN-BARÓ, S.J.

Born: November 7, 1942, in Spain A social psychologist and philosopher, Martín-Baró was a preeminent figure in the intellectual community. He studied theology in Europe and taught briefly at the University of Central America (UCA) before getting his doctorate in psychology from the University of Chicago. • After receiving his doctorate, Martín-Baró returned to UCA. In 1981 he assumed the position of academic vice-rector and was also the head of the Psychology Department, where he taught about the psychology of liberation. Called "Padre Nacho" by his rural congregation, Martín-Baró founded UCA's Institute of Public Opinion, which measured popular opinion about the civil war. • The night before his assassination, Martín-Baró spoke on the phone with his sister, who asked him if the war would end soon. His response? "A lot more people will have to die yet. A lot more people will have to die."

AMANDO LÓPEZ QUINTANA, S.J.

Born: February 6, 1939, in Spain López was a natural communicator with a passion for helping others. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1952 and would go on to study philosophy and classical humanities—and ultimately earn a doctorate in theology in France. • López returned to El Salvador to teach for a few years at the University of Central America before moving to Nicaragua. He returned to UCA in 1983 and eventually became the chair of the Philosophy Department. In his final years at UCA, he oversaw the campus's buildings and vegetable gardens. • Beyond the walls of UCA, López was the pastor of Tierra Virgen in the community of Soyapango. He also was an advocate for the nationwide literacy campaign headed by Fernando Cardenal, S.J., that reached hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans.

IGNACIO ELLACURÍA, S.J.

Born: November 9, 1930, in Spain As a teenage seminarian in El Salvador, Ellacuría was known as the "Sun King" for his compelling presence. He would go on to study classical language, humanities, and philosophy in Ecuador before completing his doctoral studies in Spain. He also received an honorary degree from Loyola in 1986, just three years before he was murdered. • Ellacuría, who was the rector of the University of Central America, was a proponent of liberation theology and one of the loudest advocates for peace negotiations during El Salvador's civil war. He acted as an informal mediator between the guerrilla fighting forces Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN) and the Salvadoran government, which made him an enemy of the far right. • Despite several threats to his life, Ellacuría continued to work for peace and the rights of innocent Salvadorans until his death.

SEGUNDO MONTES MOZO, S.J.

Born: May 15, 1933, in Spain Known as "Zeus" because of his long beard and tall build, Montes became a prominent figure in the intellectual community with his forceful and fiery energy. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1950 at the age of 17 and completed his novitiate at Santa Tecla, El Salvador, in 1951. • Over the next several years Montes taught physics, studied in Austria, and earned a doctorate in social anthropology in Spain. He returned to El Salvador in 1978 to become the chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Central America. • Like Ellacuría, Montes was a staunch advocate for the poor—and as such, he became a target of the political right. After "Death to the Communists of UCA" was painted on his car, Montes was asked about his safety. He simply said: "If they kill me, they kill me."

JUAN RAMÓN MORENO PARDO, S.J.

Born: August 29, 1933, in Spain Moreno was a scholar, theologian, and key figure in the development of the University of Central America. He entered the Society of Jesus when he was in his early twenties and studied classical humanities in Ecuador. He then taught chemistry at the Jesuit College of Granada in Nicaragua. • It was not until 1965 that Moreno continued his own studies at St. Louis University in Missouri, where he earned a degree in theology. He then traveled to Rome to study Ignatian spirituality and to train young Jesuits. He eventually ended up in Panama, where he helped found the Ignatian Center of Central America. • In 1985 the Society sent him to UCA, and while he was there he organized the theological library, which would become one of the finest in all of El Salvador.

JOAQUÍN LÓPEZ Y LÓPEZ, S.J.

Born: August 16, 1918, in El Salvador The oldest of the eight people killed, López was the only slain Jesuit who was born in El Salvador. He earned several degrees as a student in Texas and was ordained a priest in 1952 when he took his vows to the Society of Jesus. • López eventually returned to his native El Salvador and contributed to the University of Central America, but not as a professor. When engineering professor Jon Cortina, S.J., left to work among the repopulated communities of Chalatenango, López stepped in and took charge of the university's administration. • In 1969 López helped bring the Fe y Alegría (Faith and Joy) foundation to El Salvador to educate marginalized children, teens, and adults. Despite poor health, López dedicated much of his time and energy to the organization until his death at age 71.

CELINA RAMOS AND ELBA RAMOS

Elba born: March 5, 1947, in El Salvador; Celina born: February 21, 1973, in El Salvador Elba Ramos was a cook and housekeeper at the University of Central America, and her husband, Obdulio, was a watchman and gardener at the college. Their daughter Celina was a high school student. • The family originally lived in a separate house on the UCA campus, but fearing for their safety, Elba and Celina moved into an empty room at the Jesuits' residence. The two were murdered in cold blood because the Salvadoran army did not want to leave any witnesses. • Obdulio found all eight bodies the following morning. He planted a circle of six red rose bushes for the Jesuits and two yellow rose bushes in the center of the circle for his wife and daughter. The roses still grow today.

Born: November 7, 1942, in Spain A social psychologist and philosopher, Martín-Baró was a preeminent figure in the intellectual community. He studied theology in Europe and taught briefly at the University of Central America (UCA) before getting his doctorate in psychology from the University of Chicago. • After receiving his doctorate, Martín-Baró returned to UCA. In 1981 he assumed the position of academic vice-rector and was also the head of the Psychology Department, where he taught about the psychology of liberation. Called "Padre Nacho" by his rural congregation, Martín-Baró founded UCA's Institute of Public Opinion, which measured popular opinion about the civil war. • The night before his assassination, Martín-Baró spoke on the phone with his sister, who asked him if the war would end soon. His response? "A lot more people will have to die yet. A lot more people will have to die."

Born: February 6, 1939, in Spain López was a natural communicator with a passion for helping others. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1952 and would go on to study philosophy and classical humanities—and ultimately earn a doctorate in theology in France. • López returned to El Salvador to teach for a few years at the University of Central America before moving to Nicaragua. He returned to UCA in 1983 and eventually became the chair of the Philosophy Department. In his final years at UCA, he oversaw the campus's buildings and vegetable gardens. • Beyond the walls of UCA, López was the pastor of Tierra Virgen in the community of Soyapango. He also was an advocate for the nationwide literacy campaign headed by Fernando Cardenal, S.J., that reached hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans.

Born: November 9, 1930, in Spain As a teenage seminarian in El Salvador, Ellacuría was known as the "Sun King" for his compelling presence. He would go on to study classical language, humanities, and philosophy in Ecuador before completing his doctoral studies in Spain. He also received an honorary degree from Loyola in 1986, just three years before he was murdered. • Ellacuría, who was the rector of the University of Central America, was a proponent of liberation theology and one of the loudest advocates for peace negotiations during El Salvador's civil war. He acted as an informal mediator between the guerrilla fighting forces Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN) and the Salvadoran government, which made him an enemy of the far right. • Despite several threats to his life, Ellacuría continued to work for peace and the rights of innocent Salvadorans until his death.

Born: May 15, 1933, in Spain Known as "Zeus" because of his long beard and tall build, Montes became a prominent figure in the intellectual community with his forceful and fiery energy. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1950 at the age of 17 and completed his novitiate at Santa Tecla, El Salvador, in 1951. • Over the next several years Montes taught physics, studied in Austria, and earned a doctorate in social anthropology in Spain. He returned to El Salvador in 1978 to become the chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Central America. • Like Ellacuría, Montes was a staunch advocate for the poor—and as such, he became a target of the political right. After "Death to the Communists of UCA" was painted on his car, Montes was asked about his safety. He simply said: "If they kill me, they kill me."

Born: August 29, 1933, in Spain Moreno was a scholar, theologian, and key figure in the development of the University of Central America. He entered the Society of Jesus when he was in his early twenties and studied classical humanities in Ecuador. He then taught chemistry at the Jesuit College of Granada in Nicaragua. • It was not until 1965 that Moreno continued his own studies at St. Louis University in Missouri, where he earned a degree in theology. He then traveled to Rome to study Ignatian spirituality and to train young Jesuits. He eventually ended up in Panama, where he helped found the Ignatian Center of Central America. • In 1985 the Society sent him to UCA, and while he was there he organized the theological library, which would become one of the finest in all of El Salvador.

Born: August 16, 1918, in El Salvador The oldest of the eight people killed, López was the only slain Jesuit who was born in El Salvador. He earned several degrees as a student in Texas and was ordained a priest in 1952 when he took his vows to the Society of Jesus. • López eventually returned to his native El Salvador and contributed to the University of Central America, but not as a professor. When engineering professor Jon Cortina, S.J., left to work among the repopulated communities of Chalatenango, López stepped in and took charge of the university's administration. • In 1969 López helped bring the Fe y Alegría (Faith and Joy) foundation to El Salvador to educate marginalized children, teens, and adults. Despite poor health, López dedicated much of his time and energy to the organization until his death at age 71.

Elba born: March 5, 1947, in El Salvador; Celina born: February 21, 1973, in El Salvador Elba Ramos was a cook and housekeeper at the University of Central America, and her husband, Obdulio, was a watchman and gardener at the college. Their daughter Celina was a high school student. • The family originally lived in a separate house on the UCA campus, but fearing for their safety, Elba and Celina moved into an empty room at the Jesuits' residence. The two were murdered in cold blood because the Salvadoran army did not want to leave any witnesses. • Obdulio found all eight bodies the following morning. He planted a circle of six red rose bushes for the Jesuits and two yellow rose bushes in the center of the circle for his wife and daughter. The roses still grow today.

Jesuits to follow

Meet the Jesuit influencers (and one alum) bringing 450-year-old traditions to just 140 characters.

Pope Francis

His Holiness’s Twitter handle @Pontifex means “bridge-builder” in Latin.

James Martin, S.J.

Through social media and his books, he engages his followers and readers on important social justice issues.

Paddy Gilger, S.J.

From politics to the NBA to great quotes, America’s culture editor curates a diverse and funny Twitter feed.

Steve Katsouros, S.J.

There’s always news and events at Arrupe College, and following the dean is a great way to stay on top of it all.

Shane Liesegang, S.J.

The former game developer and writer puts his Jesuit spin on the gaming world, pop culture, and day-to-day life in the Bronx.

Greg Boyle, S.J.

#MotivationalMondays and “Thought for the Day” from Homeboy Industries are perfect additions to anyone's feed.

Thomas Reese, S.J.

His social accounts look at the news and debates that are taking place across the world through a Jesuit lens.

Zac Davis

A slightly biased selection, this Loyola alum is one of the hosts of jesuitical, a podcast for young Catholics.

The Jesuit Post

The Jesuit Post is your destination for Ignatian spirituality with a pop culture twist.

Loyola University Chicago

Keep up with the stories, events, and work of Chicago's Jesuit, Catholic University.