Loyola University Chicago

Fine Arts

Department of Fine and Performing Arts

Fine Arts Course Catalog

A survey of major art movements in Europe and America from Impressionism through the twentieth century, this course examines evolving ideas about the forms, content, techniques, and functions of art in the modern era considered within its social, political, and historical context.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the ideas, formal expressions, themes, techniques, and functions of art in relation to the social- historical context of the modern era.  Students acquire the skills to critically analyze the relationships between art forms and their relation to modern culture.

An examination of the history of the Chicago School of Architecture along with public sculpture and mural painting in Chicago, this course explores the changing trends of American public art, artists response to a public audience, and issues of social responsibility. Participation in class field trips is required.

Outcome: Students will be able to identify the major social concerns of the city as well as the means by which visual arts can be integrated into its daily life. They will be able to recognize the major artists and recent artistic developments in their urban context.

An examination of women artists in Western culture and the societies in which they worked, from the medieval period to the present; women's artistic production; the styles and subject matter they embraced; and their relation to artistic trends of their eras are explored within the context of social attitudes about gender.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of women's contribution to the visual arts, the factors that impacted their participation in the art world, the underlying ways that gender constructions impact society, and feminist theory and methodologies related to art.

Prerequisite: FNAR 113

An intermediate level drawing course designed to extend the understanding of the visual elements of drawing introduced in FNAR 113. This course includes an emphasis on color and an exploration of a broader range of drawing media. Observational and conceptual problems are introduced.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of more advanced drawing principles through expanded practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.

Prerequisite: FNAR 114

An intermediate level painting course designed to extend the understanding of the application of drawing, design, and color principles introduced in FNAR 114. This course will explore both oil and acrylic painting and a variety of substrates. Emphasis on the human figure and individualized conceptual problems will be introduced to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation of form through the painting idiom.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of more advanced painting principles through expanded practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.

Prerequisite: FNAR 115

This course broadens knowledge of the medium by introducing more advanced technical and creative possibilities including film/developer combinations, use of handheld light meters, medium format cameras and studio lighting, manipulative darkroom processes, archival processing, and producing work in a series. An adjustable 35mm camera is required, Medium format cameras are provided.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding and application of the relationships between exposure and development; how film, format, and lighting choices affect form and content; the diverse means of employing light-sensitive materials; and producing cogent series of photographic works that integrate technical, formal, and aesthetic principles.

Prerequisite: FNAR 115

This course introduces the processes, techniques, and aesthetics of color. Students gain a working knowledge of color film exposure and producing color prints as they exploit the additional descriptive abilities of color to expand their practice of photography as communication and personal expression. An adjustable 35mm camera is required.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate understanding and application of the critical exposure requirements of color materials with different light sources, the numerous variables of producing color-balanced prints, the use of color as formal element in photographic compositions, and the use of color as an interpretive and expressive component in photographic imagery.

Prerequisite: FNAR 118

This course explores specialized work in intaglio, monotypes, and mixed media. Emphasis is placed on the development and perfecting of technique.

Outcome: Students demonstrate understanding of mixed-media printing; knowledge of a wide range of printmaking media; apply drawing concepts to the materials of printmaking; produce a consistent body of work in a complex medium; recognize historical prototypes and articulate the differences to others; and form judgments needed to adapt image making in a highly technical area of expression.

Prerequisite: FNAR 115

An introduction to digital photography as a medium of visual communication and personal expression. Students learn the fundamental operation of the digital camera, flatbed scanner, and inkjet printer in conjunction with picture-editing software. This enables students to continue exploring the photographic themes and vision initiated in previous courses. Digital cameras are provided; an adjustable 35mm camera is required.

Outcome: Students demonstrate understanding and application of the numerous exposure, capture, playback, and output modes of current digital technology; the advantages and limitations of integrating analog and digital photography; the range of choices for physical or electronic output; and the possibilities that digital technology offers to expand the photographer’s visual expression.

An examination of practical and experimental approaches to applied chemistry as it relates to the ceramic arts.  Students will learn the theory behind clay and glaze formulation, test a wide array of materials interactions, and learn practical skills in developing vitreous bodies, glass forming substances, and metallic oxide pigments.

Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of inorganic compounds and their useful combinations in formulating ceramic bodies, glazes, and pigments; demonstrate knowledge of the effects of firing temperature and atmosphere on ceramic formulations; and demonstrate knowledge of safe lab practices in the ceramics studio.

Prerequisite: FNAR 120 or 121

An intermediate studio course which explores ceramics as a fine arts medium.  Students pursue techniques and materials most suited to their needs while expanding skills and furthering development of a personal approach to the art of ceramics.

Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to choose appropriate materials and methods to achieve their goals; apply knowledge of glaze and clay body formulation, testing, and preparation; demonstrate the ability to resolve more complex visual and conceptual concepts; and meaningfully discuss key issues pertaining to contemporary ceramic art.

Prerequisite: FNAR 123

Advanced work in metalwork and jewelry including problems in the techniques of lost wax casting and enameling.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to control materials with the addition of stones, found objects, and other materials; design and cast works in the round; design a work and see it through from production to completion; and demonstrate knowledge of a wide range of metalwork techniques and their decorative and design potential.

Further development of problems in the student's choice of media and technique.

Prerequisite: FNAR 132

A continued study of the visual and conceptual principles introduced in 132, set in a strong historical context.

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of graphic design history and its relation to historic events. They will advance in their understanding of visual communication and in their ability to evaluate it.

An introduction to the Macintosh computer as a tool in graphic design. The three industry standard software programs are introduced as a vehicle for learning basic design concepts and creative expression.

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of software skills and design basics. They will develop the ability and techniques to manipulate software in the production of artistic compositions that effectively combine image and typography.

Prerequisite: FNAR 113 or FNAR 114 or permission of the instructor

An advanced level studio course designed to introduce the human form with an emphasis on the application of drawing and wet media. Skeletal anatomy and concepts of visualization and proportion will be explored. Observational and conceptual problems will be introduced. The course may be taken twice for credit.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the human form and anatomy through expanded practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.

Content may vary according to the particular focus of the instructor.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the richness of African-American visual arts as they developed within and outside the purview of traditional art venues.

Sewn, glued, and free form structures will form the basis for the study of image and text within the framework of a personal approach to alternative surfaces.

Outcomes: Students will be able to construct and manipulate a wide variety of media using the grammar and language of the book form. Through selected projects students will utilize compositional and descriptive elements to communicate ideas and concepts in book form.

An examination of Nineteenth Century art in Paris as shaped by contemporary changes in the physical, social, and economic life of the city.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of nineteenth century art and artists in the context of the emergence of a modern, industrial urban complex.

An examination of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from the colonial period to the period immediately following World War II. Emphasis is placed on the development of specifically American art forms as they evolved from their dependency upon European sources.

Outcome: Students will be able to recognize and demonstrate knowledge of major artists and artistic movements from the earliest days of the Republic when Europe served as a source of training and inspiration, to the beginnings of modern times when global developments shifted the focus of artistic inspiration to New York.

An examination of recent developments in American and European art beginning with the physical shift of the center of artistic authority from Paris to New York during and immediately after World War II.

Outcome: Students will be able to recognize and demonstrate knowledge of major artists and artistic movements from the mid-twentieth century to the present day. They will also understand the major theoretical issues of the period.

Prerequisite: FNAR 213 or FNAR 214 or equivalent

The most advanced level studio course in painting and drawing, this is designed to aid the student in developing a body of creative work from conception to production to presentation. This course is conducted as an individual studio practicum between the instructor and student. The course may be taken twice for credit.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate a strong understanding of their own creative process through the development of a cohesive body of work.

Prerequisite: FNAR 170

An application of two- and three-dimensional principles and methodologies to advanced studio projects in fine and applied areas.

Outcome: Students will be able to develop a series of multi-dimensional structures that utilize planar and spatial techniques to communicate a body of information and sensory experiences to others.

Prerequisites: FNAR 114 and 214 

An advanced level painting course designed to extend the understanding of the application of drawing, design, and color principles introduced in FNAR 114 and expanded in FNAR 214. This course will explore a range of painting materials and substrates.  Emphasis is placed on critique and the development of conceptual problems to build technical, perceptual, and personal expressive interpretation.

OutcomeStudents will develop a body of work through expanded practice and articulation of both formal and artistic ideas.

Prerequisite: FNAR 215 or 216 or instructor permission.

An advanced course with a professional orientation for the serious student of photography. Students learn the use of large format cameras and lenses, the zone system of exposure and development, as well as basic studio practices that include continuous and strobe lighting and meters. All equipment is provided.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding and application of view camera movements, measuring and interpreting subject values, producing high quality and large scale prints, the potential and limitations of large format photography, and commercial and professional standards.

Prerequisite: FNAR 218

A continued exploration of Printmaking I, II which enables the student to enhance technical and conceptual skills in printmaking mediums.

Outcome: Through selected projects students will demonstrate knowledge of contemporary trends in printmaking, including new digital media and photomechanical processes. They will acquire analysis skills and functional critical knowledge of the grammar and language of prints.

Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in Ceramics, or permission of the instructor.

An advanced Ceramics studio allowing students to independently pursue aesthetic and technical development as they articulate their unique voice in the medium of ceramics. Expert guidance is provided over a wide range of technical and conceptual approaches, with the encouragement of individual research and active class discussions.

Outcomes: Students will be able to articulate a personal viewpoint in the ceramic medium; demonstrate a practical understanding of materials formulation and kiln firing techniques; independently conceive and execute technical and aesthetic strategies in clay; as well as demonstrate an understanding of their own place in the continuum of ceramic art.

Prerequisites: FNAR 232 or permission of instructor.

A continued study of the principles underlying graphic design combined with an emphasis on the communicative power of typography and image.

Outcome: Students gain an understanding of how contemporary design is used to communicate. They begin to develop a sophisticated body of work and advance in their ability to evaluate visual communication.

Prerequisite: FNAR 233

In-depth exploration of advanced concepts and techniques in digital imagery and illustration development. Includes introduction to digital multimedia, animation, and interactivity.

Outcome: Students will gain an advanced knowledge in software manipulation skills. They will develop the ability to conceptualize an idea more effectively and begin to apply that knowledge to digital multimedia.

Advanced study of digital multimedia. Develop skills in animation, interactivity, and sound editing. Students will build knowledge of fine art and design elements in the creation of digital multimedia art.

Outcome: Students gain an understanding of the most recent issues in multimedia development. They will build a sophisticated series of skills in the creation of animation, combined with audio, using current broadcast quality software.

An examination of the art and architecture of the Christian world from 250 to 1453 CE, including the Early Christian, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as the influence of Islamic culture.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of forms, ideas, themes, techniques, and functions of medieval art and their relation to relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts. They will acquire the skills to critically analyze these relationships and to understand the scholarship and issues related to medieval studies.

An examination of pictorial arts of the Renaissance in Northern and Southern Europe within the context of the material culture and society of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Content may vary according to the particular focus of the instructor.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of techniques, formats, themes, forms, functions, and patronage of European painting and its relation to society and culture, and will acquire the skills to critically analyze these relationships.

A survey of Rome's artistic heritage, including architecture, mosaic, painting, and sculpture from antiquity to the present day studied within the context of Rome's changing roles in Western European history. Classes are taught on site at the John Felice Rome Center.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of Rome's cultural role in history and of its artistic traditions and how they relate to their historical context.

An examination of art and architecture in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with special concentration on the preeminence of Rome (Rome Center students are expected to visit and study certain works of art in their original location).

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of forms, ideas, themes, techniques, and functions of seventeenth and eighteenth-century Western European art and their relation to relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts. They acquire skills to critically analyze these relationships and to understand the scholarship and issues related to Baroque studies.

An examination of Italian art and architecture from the late thirteenth to the late fifteenth centuries with special emphasis on Florence, Siena, and centers in northern Italy such as Padua and Mantua (Rome Center students visit and study certain works of art in their original location).

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of forms, ideas, themes, techniques, and functions of early Italian Renaissance art and their relation to relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts. They acquire skills to critically analyze these relationships and to understand the scholarship and issues related to Italian Renaissance art.

An examination of Italian painting, sculpture, and architecture from the late fifteenth through the sixteenth centuries, focusing on the art of Florence, Rome, and Venice and including consideration of such artists as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian (Rome Center students visit and study works of art in their original location).

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of forms, ideas, themes, techniques, and functions of Italian High Renaissance and Mannerist art and their relation to relevant cultural, social, and historical contexts. Students acquire skills to critically analyze these relationships and to understand the scholarship and issues related to Italian High Renaissance and Mannerist art.

An examination of the major cultural and art forms of Mesoamerica and South America from earliest remains to the fall of the Aztec and Inca empires.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to distinguish the sculptural, pictorial, and architectural styles of the diverse cultures found within the geographical boundaries defined. They will be cognizant of the controlling ritual and burial practices as well as the wealth of archeological finds still being uncovered.

An examination of the traditional arts of West Africa and the Pacific and their role in the control and organization of tribal societies before the introduction of European influences.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate understanding of the unique role of the visual arts and music in the transmission of traditional mores. They will demonstrate understanding of the social and artistic distinctions found in a comparison of highly centralized societies with loosely defined tribal organization and how this is reflected in different cultural standards.

An examination of the cultural background and major art forms of South Asia from the Indus River Valley settlements to the Present. As well as sculpture, architecture and painting, popular visual art forms will be examined.

Outcomes: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the religious, cultural and political forces shaping South Asian art. They will be able to distinguish the regional styles and identify the major monuments of South Asia. Students will understand the role of the visual arts in South Asian society.

An examination of the cultural background and major visual art forms of China from prehistoric to early modern times.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the philosophical and religious sources of the major traditional art forms of China.  They will recognize the degree to which Confucian morality controlled the social and intellectual principles by which society was governed and the arts evaluated until the advent of Communism.

An examination of the cultural background and major art forms of Japan from earliest times until the twentieth century. 

Outcome: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the philosophical and religious sources of the major art forms of Japan.  They will recognize the dual formative influences of indigenous traditions and those of foreign origin in what becomes a uniquely Japanese adaptation and resolution of ideas expressed effectively either verbally or visually.

A chronological and thematic survey of the history of photography, especially in Europe and America. Fine art and utilitarian applications of the medium are considered by examining photographers who represent the origin and development of major pictorial forms; the interaction between technology and imagery; and the relationships between photography and historical, social and cultural events.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the most important pictorial forms, themes, practitioners, processes and context of photography as a fine and applied art from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present.

An examination of the history of the built environment from the earliest known forms to contemporary examples, in terms of architectural theory, structural realities and socio-cultural usages. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the many ways architecture serves the human race, and be able to constructively analyze the specific functions buildings serve within their particular cultural temporal milieu.

Prerequisite: permission of director and of Fine Arts advisor

An introduction to the various aspects of museum/gallery administration, scholarship, and mechanics of organizing and mounting exhibitions. On-campus internships are available at LUMA and the Department of Fine Arts Gallery. Some off-campus internships can be arranged. Click here for more information about the Gallery Internship.

Outcome: Students will gain practical experience in the professional world and will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the various aspects of gallery/museum administration, scholarship, and exhibition preparation.

Prerequisite: FNAR 332, Visual Communication majors only

Visual Communication majors complete an internship providing an opportunity to use their visual and technical skills in a professional setting.

Outcome: Students work with others to develop and complete projects on a predetermined schedule; they get the opportunity to learn from professionals in the field, and find out how well they are doing as judged by the world outside the classroom.

Prerequisite: permission of chairperson

Visual Communication majors complete an internship providing an opportunity to use their visual and technical skills in a professional setting.

Outcome: Students work with others to develop and complete projects on a predetermined schedule; they get the opportunity to learn from professionals in the field and find out how well they are doing as judged by the world outside the classroom.

Prerequisites: FNAR 332, senior standing

This course perfects the practice and tools of visual communication through a series of advanced projects and an introduction to portfolio development.

Outcome: Students will be prepared to use their knowledge of visual communication, technical skills, and critical faculties to participate in their communities.

Prerequisites:  FNAR 233 

An exploration of interactive graphic design using Adobe Dreamweaver. This industry standard software is introduced as a vehicle for learning interactive design concepts as applied to web design and mobile platforms.

Outcomes: Students gain an understanding of software skills and design basics. They develop the ability and techniques to manipulate software in the production of interactive media effectively combining image and typography.

Prerequisites:  FNAR 200 and 201, or permission of instructor

An examination of theoretical, critical and methodological issues as related to Modern and Post-Modern art.  

Outcome:  Students will learn to recognize and apply a range of appropriate theoretical approaches and scholarly methods.

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor 

The first half of the capstone experience for art history majors. In Senior Thesis I students develop and research a topic for an in-depth scholarly research paper.

Outcome: Students produce a thesis statement, detailed outline, and annotated bibliography appropriate to their topic. They develop an independent research project, synthesize and apply knowledge and skills learned in previous art history classes; apply ideas from scholarly sources; critically analyze and articulate in verbal and written form ideas relevant to their topic.

Prerequisite: FNAR 391 

The second half of the capstone experience for art history majors. In Senior Thesis II, students write an in-depth scholarly research paper. 

Outcome: Students produce a polished in-depth research paper.  They demonstrate the ability to synthesize and apply ideas from scholarly sources; formulate, develop, and defend a thesis; and critically analyze and articulate in verbal and written form the issues and ideas relevant to their topic.

Special topics in specific areas of study in studio art. 

Outcome:  Students will master topics in areas of studio art not offered elsewhere in the curriculum.

Prerequisites: acceptance of portfolio for admission to the program no later than the previous semester; completion of the most advanced studio course in the student's concentration. 

Outcome: Students will demonstrate the ability to produce art work suitable for exhibit.

Prerequisite: written permission of instructor and chairperson. 

Advanced student are afforded the opportunity to work on an in-depth project in the medium of his/her choice in a tutorial setting. The course is developed in consultation with a faculty advisor and is stated formally in a written contract. of definition, goals, procedures and outcomes. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to produce a significant body of original artwork on a focused theme.