Loyola University Chicago

Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

archive

Pamela Morris

Pamela Morris

Pamela Morris

Title:

Associate Professor, Program Director Advertising/Public Relations

Dr. Pamela Morris describes herself as someone who has always enjoyed diversity in her work and her life. There are several universities that she has lent her talents to, including Syracuse, DePaul, Northern Illinois University—and now, of course, Loyola University Chicago. Morris has held her position at Loyola for nearly ten years now, and she shares that what keeps her here is the students. “There’s something very thoughtful about our students,” she notes. “I’ve gotten to see a lot of students, and there is a difference.”

Having taught in places like Beijing and Rome, Morris finds it extremely important to take her lessons out of the classroom and into the real world. “I try to use PowerPoints only as a reference; I try to mix it up. I love to teach out of the classroom. You don’t have to go over to Rome [for the experience]. We can use Chicago as a classroom.” Since Morris primarily teaches advertising classes, venturing into the real world is extremely valuable to her students. Having class in different places around the city gives them the opportunity to study the effectiveness of advertisements in real time.

One of the more important things to Dr. Morris is ensuring that she equips her students with the proper knowledge and ethics to go into the advertising field: “Trying to teach students to be ethical and moral in their decisions in life, especially their professional life, is one of the reasons I came to the university. I wanted to give students the skills to be smart in advertising and not to stoop down and be unethical.” Morris speaks about her time in advertising, recalling that some professionals would often abuse their power and authority. “I hated that. I fought against that. I said, we need to be smart and do the best research to outsmart our competition, not like some professionals who think you can take shortcuts. I love the advertising profession and the beautiful messages you can make, and I hate that it can become a horrible, thoughtless industry. It’s not, it really isn’t. I want to make sure we fill the profession with good people.”

Any class with Professor Morris is bound to be an exciting one, which anyone could see as soon as they meet her. Her vibrant personality and passion for her work are infectious. It is not only important to her to teach her students academically, but also to attempt to shape them into respectable, moral workers in their future careers. Her creativity, compassion, and kind heart make her a role model that students—and even colleagues—can always look up to.

Interview and write up by Mia Sciarrone

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Mark G Kuczewski

Mark G Kuczewski

Title:

Director, Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics & Professor of Medical Ethics, Stritch School of Medicine

It is fairly rare to find someone with an intense interest in their own work as well as helping those in need, but Dr. Mark G Kuczewski, PhD carries both passions equally. Having been a part of the Stritch School of Medicine since 2000, Dr. Kuczewski shares that he has “found a home” in Loyola, which is perhaps what motivates him to be so heavily involved in carrying out the Jesuit mission.

When asked what keeps him at Loyola, Kuczewski responds, “without a doubt it’s the ideal of Jesuit education as ‘the service of faith and the promotion of justice.’” He believes that Loyola University Chicago brings the Jesuit ideals to life, particularly in the aspect of helping people who are marginalized and stigmatized, whom Kuczewski points out are “exactly the people Jesus spent his time with.” Even with such a rigorous schedule and complicated classes, Kuczewski manages to integrate these ideals into his day to day schedule by spending much of his time working with undocumented students at Loyola. “I have been moved by their commitment and determination despite being unfairly marginalized by our legal system,” Kuczewski shares. “I have been impressed by the way the student bodies of the Stritch School of Medicine and the undergraduate students have joined the undocumented students to work for justice. [. . .] Loyola students are the kind of people who understand that injustices to their peers are injustices to them. I couldn’t admire them more.”

Kuczewski’s students are lucky to have a professor that is so passionate about both his teaching and social justice—but he prefers to refer to his pupils in a different manner: “I tend to use the term ‘participant’ more often than student. Participant seems more active and indicates that learners uncover things together through their efforts; they are not sponges absorbing knowledge from the teacher. As an educator, I try to provide the conditions to facilitate their discovery.”

One class he is most well-known for teaching is Bioethics, which “is grounded in the exploration of real-life cases that health-care professionals face.” In fact, Kuczewski founded the first two online graduate Bioethics programs in the United States including the one here at Loyola with the help of Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD. So, naturally, Kuczewski finds online teaching methods an efficient way for students to connect and participate more thoroughly in lessons and assignments. “However,” he states, “technology is a means to an end, and that end is analysis of real-life experience.” One of the lessons he incorporates into his Organizational Ethics and Leadership course is an example of how Kuczewski assists his students in real-life experience. “I conduct a session in which the participants prepare to write their personal mission statement. I go around the room asking each to tell me what they do best and what they enjoy doing most. They then incorporate these assets into their four or five sentence mission statement,” he explains. The most rewarding part of the lesson for Kuczewski is that students realize their value and “how staying true to who they are” can vastly improve their performance in the long run.

Seeing how selfless of a person Dr. Kuczewski is, it only makes sense that he will not even take full credit for his magnificent teaching skills. Rather, he sees himself as more of a middle man in the learning process: “In the end, learning happens through the participant’s encounter with creation. St. Ignatius suggests that they are in fact encountering the Creator in the activity of learning. We should never to forget how privileged we are to be engaging in education.” The fact that Kuczewski views his career as a privilege speaks volumes about his character; he is a true example of what a professor at a Jesuit university should be, making him an amazing addition to Loyola’s staff and an admirable role model for all of Loyola’s students.

Interview and write up by Mia Sciarrone

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Sara Gramata

Sara Gramata

Sara Gramata

Title:

Lecturer/Clinical Instructor, Quinlan School of Business - Marketing

It is difficult to be upbeat and chipper for a 9:20am class every day, but regardless, this professor manages to keep a constant smile on her face and thread jokes into every lesson. For Sara Gramata, teaching has always come naturally—in fact, she found her first pupil when she was just four or five years old. “I adopted a pet lamb and named her Bright Eyes. I not only fed her a bottle of milk before and after school, but read to her daily. I tried to get Bright Eyes to do tricks, but I don't think any of them stuck!” Professor Gramata shares. While her efforts may have been futile when it came to her baby lamb, Sara has carried her nurturing soul and desire to teach throughout the rest of her life.

Sara has been teaching since 2005, but feels that the atmosphere at Loyola surpasses that of any other teaching environment she has experienced. She sees “the Jesuit spirit instilled in many ways around the campus, truly making Loyola unique and genuine.” Loyola has enabled her to work along with students and charities on top of her rigorous teaching schedule.

Having worked in New York City and Chicago as a marketing professional for fifteen years, Sara finds it helpful to include stories of her own personal experiences in her lessons. Additionally, she enjoys using “weekly learning activities” that encourage her students to work together and practice real world problem solving. Regarding her favorite lesson, Sara says it “involves segmenting a target market. The exercise is based on a hypothetical gun range and demonstrates the various audiences who might use [the] service. Students are always surprised to find out there may be many more consumers (who are varied in purpose) accessing a gun range than they originally expected.” Recently, she ran into a student that graduated eight years ago; he still remembered a specific lesson of hers, mentioning that he had used it to help him in his current marketing job.

Most of the best lessons she learned about herself, Sara states, were learned in college. So, she understands her students’ experiences and is able to help them learn both inside and outside of her classroom. Her willingness to care for her students goes above and beyond the responsibility of a professor—she even extends invitations to her students to join her and her family at her home for Thanksgiving and Easter if they do not have anywhere else to go. “Without a doubt it's the students who keep me at Loyola. It's true I learn from them as much as they, hopefully, learn from me. I truly respect the students at Loyola and tease them that once they take my class, they are my students for life. I would do anything to help a student whether it's help find a job or internship, listen to their problems, or help advice on a difficult situation.” With her inherent generosity, extensive knowledge, and an immense love for teaching, Sara Gramata has done—and will continue to do—amazing things for Loyola and its students.

Interview and write up by Mia Sciarrone

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

David Doherty

David Doherty

Title:

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

For six years now, Dr. David Doherty has been a contributing member of Loyola’s Department of Political Science. He loves his two kids, playing the accordion (although, admittedly, not very well), and everything that the population and campus of Loyola has to offer. His love of teaching undeniably shines through when he speaks of his profession.

“One of the things that I like about Loyola is that we’re encouraged as faculty to engage in both research and teaching, so in the classroom I try to integrate those two things. I try to engage students with some of the research that I’m doing or that other scholars are doing and introduce them to how we go about trying to answer questions that we then end up teaching in the classroom.”

Integration of research into the classroom is important to Dr. Doherty. He believes that obtaining classroom knowledge and real world experience are both equally vital when it comes to the professional world, as well as everyday life.

“I think the [skills we develop] are tied to our ability to answer questions about the world. If we want to change the world, we need to understand how the world works. We need to understand what kind of policies or inventions might improve the world, and trying to develop an understanding of how to systematically go about answering those questions is one way that I think students can become more prepared to act effectively in the world.”

Dr. Doherty has found that many students gravitate more towards this research-based learning in his politics classes, and some even follow up with him later in hopes to educate themselves further on the subject matter. It is obvious that he is able to make a real connection with his students; they enjoy his class just as much as he enjoys teaching it.

“My primary area of expertise is public opinion research, so I teach a class on that every couple of years and I really enjoy that. It’s an opportunity to share some of my greatest strengths, in terms of some of the topics I’m [best] at. It’s a topic that I think students really engage with because it’s familiar. It’s sort of thinking about how people think; we all have models in our mind about how people make decisions about politics, and to work through some attempts to understand that more systematically is rewarding for me—and I think for the students, too.”

Interview and write up by Mia Sciarrone

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Suzanne Bost

Suzanne Bost

Title: Professor, Loyola University Department of English

Affiliated Faculty Member and Director of Graduate Program, Loyola University Chicago Department of Women's Studies and Gender Studies (WSGS).

Since 2008, Suzanne Bost has been an active member of both the Women's Studies and Gender Studies (WSGS) and English Departments at Loyola University Chicago. From 2012 onward, she has also served as the director of the university’s graduate program in Gender Studies, a position that further extends her diverse and wide-ranging purview

“I teach a wide range of courses, from UCLR to a core course in Women in Literature. I teach advanced English courses in Latina/o literature and feminist theory as well as graduate courses in Latina/o literature, feminist theory, and feminist methodologies.”

Positively integral to Dr. Bost’s decision to join the Loyola faculty was the university’s “social justice mission”, which she also cites as the reason for the apparent proclivity of Loyola students towards engagement within and outside the classroom.

“Loyola is the first place I’ve worked where I feel like the majority of students are committed to learning, here to learn, intellectually curious, and brave about speaking up in class. The majority of them came here knowing that this was a university with a social justice mission and came here for that reason. That has been very helpful, to have students who are already engaged before I meet them.”

Professor Bost’s teaching and assessment practices are employed with a recognition of the integrity of the student as an active intellectual agent. Indeed, Dr. Bost argues that “learning is a decentered process” and hence “requires students to be thinking for themselves, listening, experiencing, and just being exposed.”

“Sometimes I use the metaphor of ‘opening lots of doors’ without telling people which ‘door’ is the ‘right door’ and just having them see a lot of different things and learn to make decisions for themselves.  In terms of evaluating student performance, it’s not a matter of getting things right or wrong, rather of the comfort with which they are articulating, orally or in written form, different kinds of opinions. It would probably be easier if I was just teaching content and having them spit it back to me, but it would be a lot less interesting.”

These practices have been positively received by Professor Bost’s students, who appreciate the opportunity to engage with class texts (and with one another) in an environment designed to be conducive to both analysis and debate.

“I’ve had a lot of people say ‘I’ve never been so excited and uncomfortable at the same time', about knowing that something was going to happen each time they showed up to class, and not knowing exactly what it was going to be but eventually having to trust that whatever it was, it was going to be ok, and nobody was going to yell at anybody, or hurt anybody, or  judge anybody negatively.”

Dr. Bost’s academic background grants her unique insight into the Ignatian pedagogical mission. Having been trained in feminist pedagogical methodologies, she remains cognizant of the importance of “valuing student input, hearing everyone’s distinct ideas, and respecting different opinions but also of tying these to the world we live in and thinking about how we can implement these ideas in our daily lives.”

“I just taught an honors seminar on Latino literature and social justice, and I would say that just teaching Latino literature itself is a social justice issue for Latino students who haven’t seen their culture represented in the curriculum. So there’s a justice issue in just presenting the material, there’s a justice issue in thinking about the ways in which we can relate to the material. I myself am not Latino and I talk about how it’s important to acknowledge the limits of what we know and the limits of our experience as well as being aware of the wealth of our knowledge, seeing both and valuing both equally,  and witnessing, and listening, and trying to achieve cross- cultural empathy without imposing your views on another. The final projects my students produced reveal how these are truly translatable skills into the real world. These projects illustrated how Latino literature can be employed as a tool for social justice. People have designed websites and blogs, discussed the practical actions they can take, and talked about disseminating this education at the elementary and secondary levels so that people from the start in our country are exposed to the wealth and richness of what emanates from different perspectives and different kinds of stories.”

Interview and write up by Andrew Kelly

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Patrick Duffie

Patrick Duffie

Title: Senior Lecturer, Biology and Director of the Undergraduate Program, LUC Department of Biology

Dr. Patrick Duffie has been a member of Loyola University Chicago’s Department of Biology for twenty-six years. Over the course of this period, he has always recognized the immense value of student diversity to the teaching process and experience.

“My elementary school, junior high, high school, and college were all very homogenous, I think, in terms of the student population. So it wasn’t until I came to Chicago, and Loyola in particular, that I really got exposed to a lot of different people.  That, I’ve found, is the most interesting aspect of Loyola. Just hearing where kids are from, what they do, what their backgrounds are, what they’re bringing to Loyola...it makes every semester interesting.”  

Because many of his students are freshmen, Dr. Duffie strives to create an academic environment that is “relaxed and comfortable” but also pervaded by enthusiasm for the discipline. Hence, Duffie models his pedagogical practices upon those of the teachers whose courses he most enjoyed and found beneficial: 

“In terms of teaching practices, I try to teach the way it has worked for me. I try to show the students that this can be fun, lecture class can be fun. I want participation, which is sometimes hard in biology when our classes get a little bit larger, but I want students to feel like they can approach me. Because I predominantly teach freshmen, I try to instill in them an enjoyment for the course so they can build a good foundation and like what they’re doing. I’ve always tried to make it relaxed, interesting, and not the end of the world because Biology One and Biology Two are just the beginning.”  

Hence, Dr. Duffie has effectively combined a vehement enthusiasm for his discipline and students with a fervent commitment to Loyola University Chicago's Ignatian principles and mission of global progress. Such a combination is to be celebrated particularly as Dr. Duffie reaches his twenty-sixth anniversary of service to Loyola in 2016.

Interview by Andrew Kelly

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

 

Catherine Nichols

Title:

Lecturer in Cultural Anthropology and Museum Studies, Department of Anthropology

Loyola website:

http://www.luc.edu/anthropology/faculty/drcatherineanichols/ 

Length of time at Loyola:

Since February, 2014

Catherine Nichols earned her Ph.D. in Socio-Cultural Anthropology from Arizona State University in 2014.  While she misses the weekend hiking excursions that the geography of Arizona provided, she credits Loyola University Chicago with expanding her thoughts on effective teaching practices. 

“Prior to joining Loyola, my experience in academia never addressed or prioritized teaching.  I’m grateful that Loyola has given me so many resources on ways to teach, and engagement with the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm has been really empowering.  The emphases on context, reflection, and action have particularly made me a much stronger teacher for my students.  It’s been great.” 

Along with the courses she teaches in Anthropology and Museum Studies, Catherine also oversees the May Weber Collection, an extensive ethnographic art collection comprised of about 2,500 objects assembled by Chicago collector and psychiatrist May Weber.  The curation of the collection is guided by the University’s commitment to Ignatian pedagogy, transformative education, and social responsibility.

“My students are the lifeblood of this collection.  They’re doing the cataloguing and researching of the material.  In the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm, we talk about context and how each student brings different life experience and interests to what they’re doing.  I always try and create opportunities for students to share what they know with others.  That’s a really effective method for learning in the collection.” 

Catherine’s innovative teaching methods have also helped students discover ways that their coursework at Loyola relates to real world experiences.  Her museum studies class affords students the opportunity to work with a museum collection and cultural objects for the first time.  One of her students reflected in a blog post that she realized the legitimacy of their coursework when they visited the Field Museum and discovered that the same practices were being employed in a professional setting. 

The student wrote, “I believe I have found my calling within the May Weber Collection. Rehousing artifacts ensures their safety and longevity. It is an integral part of the accession process and one that I hope to continue.” 

As an anthropologist, Catherine takes the call for social justice seriously and is grateful to work for a university that places such an emphasis on social justice work.  “I see my work as trying to unearth histories and share that information with native peoples, so they can go about the process of repatriating their cultural property.  I want students to take away from my classes a self-awareness of how they can shape their future actions to address social problems.”  

Michael Welch, JD

Title:

Senior Instructor, Quinlan School of Business

Loyola website:

http://www.luc.edu/quinlan/executive-education/faculty/michaelwelchjd/

Michael Welch’s journey to becoming a senior instructor in the Quinlan School of Business is one he calls “interesting.” After being an attorney for nearly thirty years for large companies such as Quaker Oats Company and Pepsi, he knew he wanted to transition into a teaching role. He found himself as an adjunct for three semesters before becoming a full-time professor, a position he has held for ten years.

He confessed he did not know much about the Ignatian Pedagogy before starting at Loyola, but has since embraced the particular teaching plan.

“I try to use it in all of the classes I have, but the one where Ignatian Pedagogy is the most useful is the Microenterprise Consulting class I teach,” said Welch. “So the students go in and they consult with the clients on an ongoing basis throughout the semester and at the end of that semester they write a full blown business plan for these people who want to start their own businesses.”

Through the process of understanding the contexts and experiences of these particular people, as well as reflection through journaling, Welch and his classes have helped many people around the city. One example is a gentleman named Solomon Abebe, an Ethiopian refugee who had come to the U.S. and drove a cab before Welch’s Microenterprise Consulting class helped him open up a butcher shop along N. Sheridan and Argyle in Chicago.

“For the students, when you write a business plan and then you go up to somebody’s place of business and see your plan in operation…there’s a great sense of satisfaction,” said Welch. “In terms of seeing what they can do and then seeing him be successful enough to expand his business has been outstanding.”

Welch credits Ignatian Pedagogy and its influence for the success of his students.

“One of the things that has really struck me about Ignatian pedagogy is the whole idea of accompaniment,” said Welch. “To be able to literally be a part of their lives and to understand where they’re coming from and to translate those things to the consulting process and to a real life business is probably one of the biggest and most joyful surprises that the students get out of the class.”

Interview and article by Amanda McDonald, Undergraduate Work-Study Student
Video by Amaechi Ugwu, Graduate Intern
Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Rebecca Silton

Rebecca Silton

Title:

Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology
Department of Psychology

Loyola websites:

http://www.luc.edu/psychology/facultystaff/r_silton.shtml
http://www.canlab.org/

A few of Becky’s teaching accomplishments:

2013 Sujack Master Teacher Award
2014–2016 Fellow at the Center for Experiential Learning

Length of time at Loyola:

Since 2010

Hobbies and interesting facts:

My favorite summer vacation spot is the Outer Banks of North Carolina—I love the beach :)

When I was ten years old I wrote a letter to the editor that was actually published! The letter was about saving the rainforest. At about the same time, I also helped start my neighborhood recycling program.

Description of featured teaching practice:

Students in my Neuropsychological Assessment course, which is taught to Clinical Psychology students, lead the development of the syllabus during the first week of class. This class was primarily graduate students, except for two undergraduates, and was a small seminar course. It also was unique in that most of the students in this class had taken a class together the prior semester, so the community and connections between the students were established prior to this process.

By letting the students design the syllabus content (e.g., domains covered by the course, primary assignments), it allowed the syllabus to be meaningful for students, as well as very current to the current body of research. Through this process, students engaged very highly in the class, and could see clearly how the content translated to their ultimate desire to work as clinical neuropsychologists. This did involve a high amount of work on my part, particularly at the beginning of the class, in terms of identifying readings that fit key student-identified domains and then becoming familiar with all of these readings. But my hope was to use the course to prepare students to "hit the ground running" during their first practicum experience so that leaders in the field, when teaching them through practicum, can appreciate how well Loyola students are trained. It was a true joy for me to be there in the class.

Also of note is that all students have access to the final presentations and related materials from the class through Google Docs, allowing students to use them in the future for working with clients and preparing for clinical licensing and board exams.

How Becky’s teaching practice relates to the mission and values of Loyola, such as the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm and Transformative Education:

Individualized education, such as that engendered by allowing students to assist in developing the frame of the syllabus, can be transformative, as it helps students find his or her interests, passion, what they don’t like, and set up his or her own learning plan. We can think of the syllabus as a group learning plan—where the students ARE in their learning. This approach also reflects the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm elements of context and reflection, as we reflect on how our own individual background comes into play in approaching others with disabilities. Also, students develop weekly written posts to share with other students, using a note-taking program called Evernote. This is a way to share thoughts and ideas, to post comments, and to bring those comments and ideas into class continually.

What Becky loves about Loyola:

I really enjoy the other faculty in Psychology and the students that I work with—that’s why I’m here. Faculty are collegial, collaborative, and conducting interesting and relevant research. Students are always very curious and inquisitive; they want to learn about the world and themselves, and they are really smart and ask good questions. They bring to the classroom very interesting and diverse backgrounds, both undergrad and graduate students.

Stacy Neier

Stacy Neier

Title:

Senior Lecturer, Quinlan School of Business

Length of time at Loyola:

Since 2008

Introduction

Editor-in-chief of Vogue Magazine Anna Wintour once said, “I'm always looking for a cover subject that reflects the magazine, an interest in fashion, in culture, in society. We're trying to bring the world into the pages of Vogue.”

One Loyola University Chicago professor is doing just that, bringing the world into perspective, not through a magazine, but through her students. The second recipient of the Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy’s Teaching Assessment Spotlight Award is Dr. Stacy Neier, a Marketing Professor in the Quinlan School of Business. She is an avidVogue reader dating back fifteen years, has a twin sister who is a professor at The University of Missouri, and was married in Madonna Della Strada last month.

Teaching Practice

Stacy has taught full time at Loyola since 2008 and recently received her PhD. In discussing her teaching practices, she shares, “For me, my overall philosophy with students is getting them comfortable with asking questions, knowing the answers might not readily come—and how do we navigate that process even when the answer is not within arm’s reach?” she said, referring to her favorite part of teaching.

How Stacy’s teaching practice relates to the mission and values of Loyola, such as the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm and Transformative Education

Neier’s classroom practices make her an ideal candidate for the award, specifically her use of the Ignatian Pedagogy Paradigm, or the “IPP”. Neier says she tries to show the IPP model once every other week to remind her students why their Jesuit education is so different than any other. “To put it in front of the students consistently keeps them benchmarked and tethered to that context,” she said.

In addition, Neier says she focuses on curiosity, because she “would rather have a student walk out with one thousand new questions than with a single right answer.” Neier strives to “help students feel more comfortable with the IPP model, [because] they may not understand it fully because of its complexity and ambiguity…yet [with] curiosity, we can better engage in classes, better engage in professional development, better engage in internships and external activities.”

How Stacy handles challenges in the classroom

Through her emphasis on questioning, Neier has seen a sharp increase in students interested in marketing research over the last few semesters. She has, however, faced challenges. “Students want to try on different things and are cautious. They don’t want to jump head first into something that might not have a right answer,” she said. Because of this, Neier, in addition to promoting curiosity, has been constantly reminding her students that it is okay for them to ask a question that might not have an answer right away, something she says is parallel to the values within the IPP and inherent in curiosity. “It is hard because as faculty we want to show leadership and expertise and organization of the classroom, but in a service learning context, that experience is not going to be in the back of a text book,” she said.

A true lifelong learner

Just as Anna Wintour strives to bring the world into her magazine, Neier strives to bring the world into her classrooms. She also strives to remind her students that she is in the same position they are—constantly learning things about marketing, whether through her previous experiences in the marketing world, or through the pages of one of her many white-spine Vogue issues.

Interview and article by Amanda McDonald,
Undergraduate Work-Study Student in the Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Alyson Paige Warren

Title:

Instructor, Department of English

Loyola website:

http://luc.edu/english/writinginstructors/alysonpaigewarren.shtml  

Alyson Paige Warren obtained her MFAW from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and applies her expertise in creative writing both in her capacity as an Adjunct Instructor in Loyola’s Department of English and as a writer and illustrator of children’s books.

“I’ve definitely been a reader and a writer for as long as I can remember.”

As a member of the English Department, Alyson emphasizes the central role of student involvement in her teaching and assessment practices.

“I consider myself a constructivist. I want to teach the students what they are here to learn and make them a part of that process. I know that listening and being available to students is part of Ignatian pedagogy. I try to be available to them in as many ways as possible and also to support them in as many ways as possible.”

Essential to this effort, Alyson contends, is her employment of a wide variety of “alternative teaching practices” designed to allow students to “engage with the writing process in a new way”.

“I have a heavy online presence with regard to my use of Sakai. I tend to use multiple sign systems in the classroom, anything from listening to podcasts, to watching TED talks, to engaging in performance and debate.”

Such practices, Alyson elucidates, allow her courses to remain dynamic and engaging to her students, whose active involvement in the pedagogical process “keeps the courses fresh… and developing”.

“I think it’s a kind of trap to think that education is a passive process and the professor is just there to dump all this information in your head and you either take it in or you don’t. For me, it’s really about teaching people how to think and exposing them to things.”

This pedagogical philosophy, and its emphasis of active student engagement, has been favorably received, both in the classroom and in evaluations, by those Alyson teaches.

“My evaluations are wonderful; I get really positive feedback from students. I really let them know how important their constructive criticism and feedback are to me, and that, again, is part of Ignatian pedagogy”.

Indeed, Alyson’s commitment to Ignatian pedagogy, and its elemental mission of social justice, further informs her educational practices.

“I encourage my students to be active civil students, civil servants, and members of the community, and I really seek to model in how aware I am of what’s going on with them, in their world, and in the world in general. I believe that education can be transformative. I believe that literature can be transformative. I believe that writing can be transformative. I think that by illustrating to my students that I love what we’re doing, that I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else, I’m able to share with them my passion for things that have transformed me and I hope will transform them.” 

Interview by Andrew Kelly,

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Monique Ridosh

Title:

Assistant Professor
Director, RN-BSN Program

Loyola website:

http://www.luc.edu/nursing/about/faculty/moniqueridoshphdrn.shtml

Length of time at Loyola:

Since 2007

Dr. Monique Ridosh calls herself a “transplant.” After growing up in Miami, Florida, she moved to Chicago with her husband and son ten years ago. Here, as in Miami, she finds herself surrounded by very diverse people in a city that she loves.

“It was a very transient community,” she said of her neighborhood in Miami, “then I came to Chicago, where there are more people from all over the world.”

Since moving to Chicago, Ridosh has taught nursing to undergraduate and graduate students at Loyola University Chicago and appreciates every minute of her work. She now teaches in the RN to BSN Degree Completion Program in the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing.

“The fact that it’s a Catholic institution…you’re a part of a community that embraces mission and values,” she said. “It is very different than working for industry, where you are not free in that way to practice and to teach.”

As her teaching style has evolved, she has incorporated Ignatian Pedagogy into the material, which integrates experience, reflection and judgment into learning. Ridosh focuses on reflection in order for her students to complete the learning cycle.

“In every course that I have taught, there has been some component of reflection,” she said. “I really believe that students need to learn not just to understand content, but to be able to reflect on what they learned.”

Applying reflection specifically to nursing has not been a challenge for her. In her classes, she requires students to write blog posts, either each week or at the end of the course, to reflect on how they can turn what they learned in class into their practice.

“There is a component we offer that’s focused on helping [students] think conceptually and be able to broaden their scope and look at the communities that they are serving beyond the hospital walls,” she said. “When they get that piece, you see it in their reflection.”

While Monique has witnessed the growth of her students as they proceed through the RN-to-BSN program, the students themselves have responded enthusiastically to her teaching philosophy.

“[Dr. Ridosh’s class has] opened my eyes to a new world,” said student Robin Smedley. “You go out and learn an entire new part of nursing.”

Student Kristine Yorde added, “Monique is really accessible and has great knowledge. You can tell she really cares for nurses and their continuing education.”

Interview and article by Amanda McDonald, Undergraduate Work-Study Student
Video by Amaechi Ugwu, Graduate Intern
Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

Title:

Senior Lecturer, Biology and Director of the Undergraduate Program, LUC Department of Biology

Dr. Patrick Duffie has been a member of Loyola University Chicago’s Department of Biology for twenty-six years. Over the course of this period, he has always recognized the immense value of student diversity to the teaching process and experience.

“My elementary school, junior high, high school, and college were all very homogenous, I think, in terms of the student population. So it wasn’t until I came to Chicago, and Loyola in particular, that I really got exposed to a lot of different people.  That, I’ve found, is the most interesting aspect of Loyola. Just hearing where kids are from, what they do, what their backgrounds are, what they’re bringing to Loyola...it makes every semester interesting.”  

Because many of his students are freshmen, Dr. Duffie strives to create an academic environment that is “relaxed and comfortable” but also pervaded by enthusiasm for the discipline. Hence, Duffie models his pedagogical practices upon those of the teachers whose courses he most enjoyed and found beneficial: 

“In terms of teaching practices, I try to teach the way it has worked for me. I try to show the students that this can be fun, lecture class can be fun. I want participation, which is sometimes hard in biology when our classes get a little bit larger, but I want students to feel like they can approach me. Because I predominantly teach freshmen, I try to instill in them an enjoyment for the course so they can build a good foundation and like what they’re doing. I’ve always tried to make it relaxed, interesting, and not the end of the world because Biology One and Biology Two are just the beginning.”  

Hence, Dr. Duffie has effectively combined a vehement enthusiasm for his discipline and students with a fervent commitment to Loyola University Chicago's Ignatian principles and mission of global progress. Such a combination is to be celebrated particularly as Dr. Duffie reaches his twenty-sixth anniversary of service to Loyola in 2016.

Patrick Duffie

Title: Senior Lecturer, Biology and Director of the Undergraduate Program, LUC Department of Biology

Dr. Patrick Duffie has been a member of Loyola University Chicago’s Department of Biology for twenty-six years. Over the course of this period, he has always recognized the immense value of student diversity to the teaching process and experience.

“My elementary school, junior high, high school, and college were all very homogenous, I think, in terms of the student population. So it wasn’t until I came to Chicago, and Loyola in particular, that I really got exposed to a lot of different people.  That, I’ve found, is the most interesting aspect of Loyola. Just hearing where kids are from, what they do, what their backgrounds are, what they’re bringing to Loyola...it makes every semester interesting.”  

Because many of his students are freshmen, Dr. Duffie strives to create an academic environment that is “relaxed and comfortable” but also pervaded by enthusiasm for the discipline. Hence, Duffie models his pedagogical practices upon those of the teachers whose courses he most enjoyed and found beneficial: 

“In terms of teaching practices, I try to teach the way it has worked for me. I try to show the students that this can be fun, lecture class can be fun. I want participation, which is sometimes hard in biology when our classes get a little bit larger, but I want students to feel like they can approach me. Because I predominantly teach freshmen, I try to instill in them an enjoyment for the course so they can build a good foundation and like what they’re doing. I’ve always tried to make it relaxed, interesting, and not the end of the world because Biology One and Biology Two are just the beginning.”  

Hence, Dr. Duffie has effectively combined a vehement enthusiasm for his discipline and students with a fervent commitment to Loyola University Chicago's Ignatian principles and mission of global progress. Such a combination is to be celebrated particularly as Dr. Duffie reaches his twenty-sixth anniversary of service to Loyola in 2016.

Interview by Andrew Kelly

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy

 

Title:

Instructor, Department of English

Loyola website:

http://luc.edu/english/writinginstructors/alysonpaigewarren.shtml  

Alyson Paige Warren obtained her MFAW from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and applies her expertise in creative writing both in her capacity as an Adjunct Instructor in Loyola’s Department of English and as a writer and illustrator of children’s books.

“I’ve definitely been a reader and a writer for as long as I can remember.”

As a member of the English Department, Alyson emphasizes the central role of student involvement in her teaching and assessment practices.

“I consider myself a constructivist. I want to teach the students what they are here to learn and make them a part of that process. I know that listening and being available to students is part of Ignatian pedagogy. I try to be available to them in as many ways as possible and also to support them in as many ways as possible.”

Essential to this effort, Alyson contends, is her employment of a wide variety of “alternative teaching practices” designed to allow students to “engage with the writing process in a new way”.

“I have a heavy online presence with regard to my use of Sakai. I tend to use multiple sign systems in the classroom, anything from listening to podcasts, to watching TED talks, to engaging in performance and debate.”

Such practices, Alyson elucidates, allow her courses to remain dynamic and engaging to her students, whose active involvement in the pedagogical process “keeps the courses fresh… and developing”.

“I think it’s a kind of trap to think that education is a passive process and the professor is just there to dump all this information in your head and you either take it in or you don’t. For me, it’s really about teaching people how to think and exposing them to things.”

This pedagogical philosophy, and its emphasis of active student engagement, has been favorably received, both in the classroom and in evaluations, by those Alyson teaches.

“My evaluations are wonderful; I get really positive feedback from students. I really let them know how important their constructive criticism and feedback are to me, and that, again, is part of Ignatian pedagogy”.

Indeed, Alyson’s commitment to Ignatian pedagogy, and its elemental mission of social justice, further informs her educational practices.

“I encourage my students to be active civil students, civil servants, and members of the community, and I really seek to model in how aware I am of what’s going on with them, in their world, and in the world in general. I believe that education can be transformative. I believe that literature can be transformative. I believe that writing can be transformative. I think that by illustrating to my students that I love what we’re doing, that I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else, I’m able to share with them my passion for things that have transformed me and I hope will transform them.” 

Interview by Andrew Kelly,

Student Worker, Faculty Center for Ignatian Pedagogy