Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 6W1 (May 18, 2015 - June 26, 2015)

Interpreting Literature (UCLR 100)

Section: 01L #1002
Instructor:  Conner, M. Shelly
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 10:25 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., LSC

This course will provide a broad introductory survey African American literature from the 1700s to the present with particular emphasis on the 20th century.  We will examine social, political, and economic ramifications of race, gender, disability, and sexuality marginalization by asking:

What role has writing by African Americans played in the long fight for political freedom and equality? How has that writing changed over time—stylistically or otherwise—to reflect the different political needs of its historical moment? How has that writing been shaped by different ways of thinking about race? How has race, in turn, been shaped or constructed by that writing? And how do representations of gender and sexuality participate in a literary construction of race?

This course satisfies the first tier of Loyola University’s core Knowledge Area requirement in “Literary Knowledge.”


Advanced Writing:  Business Writing (ENGL 210)

Section: 20W #1003
Instructor:  Meinhardt, Michael
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., WTC 

 Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of “personal professionalism” and “priority of purposes” guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process.

ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class.


Exploring Poetry (ENGL 271)

Section: 100 #1014
Instructor: Masello, Steven
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TWR 1:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m., LSC

In this introductory course we will read a wide and varied selection of poetry. Naturally, as in any introductory survey course, one must be highly selective—particularly within the summer session time frame. For that reason, I have determined to focus on major poets in various—but clearly defined-- time periods and genres in hopes of introducing to students a broad range of poetic expression.  Our selections will include, among others, some early medieval lyrics, selected sonnets by Shakespeare, and a special concentration on some of the great English Romantic and Victorian poets: Byron, Shelley, Keats, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Browning, and Tennyson-- and whomever else we can fit in.


Exploring Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 90W #1005
Instructor:  Boyle, Terence
3.0 credit hours Lecture
Online

This course is an introduction to classical and modern theatre. In this course we will endeavor analyze the structure and philosophical preoccupation of the authors. We will compare and contrast the classical format with the radically different modern approach. A selection of works, from different genres, will provide the basis of our investigation. We will analyze and discuss the style, structure, and theme in each of these works, focusing on the technical language and a critical analysis of each drama.

ENGL 272-90W is a writing intensive and ONLINE class.


Exploring Fiction (ENGL 273)

Section:  101 #1007
Instructor:  Quirk, Kevin
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 12:20 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., LSC

In this course we will read works of fiction that are particularly concerned with the themes of crime and punishment. We will shuttle between short stories, novels, and a film or two that examine the nature of crime and criminality, as well as questions about punishment, guilt, forgiveness, morality, and knowledge. Readings will cover both classic and popular works and will include fiction by writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Raymond Chandler, Patricia Highsmith, Flannery O’Connor, Joyce Carol Oates, and Ursula LeGuin. There will be two essays of modest length, a midterm and a final. Grading will be based primarily on papers and exams but will also include class participation, quizzes, and informal written exercises.


Exploring Shakespeare (ENGL 274)

Section:  02W #2437
Instructor:  Biester, James
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TWR 10:45 a.m. – 12:55 p.m., LSC

In this course we will study several of Shakespeare's plays, including plays from a variety of genres--comedy, history, tragedy, romance--and from various stages of his career as a playwright. We will consider the plays in relation to the intellectual, political, and social contexts in which they were produced, the theatrical practices and conventions of the age, and Shakespeare's own development as a playwright. We will also explore ways in which the plays allow for a variety of interpretations and kinds of performance, and consider various critical approaches. Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class. Requirements will include papers, response papers, and quizzes.

Please note: English majors should take English 326, not English 274.

ENGL 274-02W is a writing intensive class.


The Writing of Poetry (ENGL 317)

Section:  102 #1008
Instructor:  Goldstein, Laura
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TWR 3:35 p.m. – 5:45 p.m., LSC

This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We will read a wide range of mostly contemporary poetry in order to discuss its role as a cultural form of expression and its multiple manifestations as an art form. Readings include experimental verse, prose poetry, hybrid writing, and digital literature, all meant to encourage the young writer to consider different avenues of creativity and expression that could benefit their own writing. The workshop element of the course includes prompts for writing in class and between classes, presentations of student poetry to the group with the expectation of respectful and productive responses that will encourage writers to build upon their ideas for subject, form, and style, and in-class collective writing experiments. Students produce a final collection of poetry presented as a self-published chapbook in a final reading.


Internship (ENGL 394)

[Prerequisite for ENGL 394 is permission]

Section: 01E #1025
Instructor: Cragwall, Jasper
3.0 credit hours Internship
  

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.  Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program.  Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples.  Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins.  Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.


Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399)

Section: 103 # 1099
Instructor: Cragwall, Jasper
3.0 credit hours Lecture

Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member. 



GRADUATE COURSES

Feminist Theory (ENGL 426)

Section:  801 #2439
Instructor:  Bost, Suzanne
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., LSC

This course will introduce students to important developments, approaches, and questions in contemporary Feminist Theory – including women of color feminisms, “writing on the body,” postmodern feminisms, queer theory, and global feminisms, among others.  Our readings from the anthologies will present breadth and diversity of arguments and styles to be balanced by in-depth exploration of the different critical trajectories of two leading theorists, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Donna Haraway.  Course assignments are designed to engage students in a real practice of Feminist Theory, including regular written responses, discussion leadership, and a final conference paper.  Most of the readings will be challenging, and there are many difficult ideas to absorb from these readings, but there will also be much room for student contributions, dissent, and debate. 



Summer 6W2 (June 29, 2015 – August 7, 2015) 

Advanced Writing:  Business Writing (ENGL 210)

Section: 21W #1004
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TWR 3:35 p.m. – 5:45 p.m., WTC 

 ENGL 210-21W is a writing intensive class.


Exploring Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 03W #2101
Instructor:  Kessel, Amy
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 10:25 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., LSC

In this course we will examine the adaptation of several plays into the medium of film. We will read, discuss, and write about plays from different time periods and in different genres, including drama, comedy, and musical. All of these plays represent the relationships and complex emotions of human beings as individuals, as family members, and as members of society. We will begin by reading and discussing each of the original stage plays and then viewing the film into which it was adapted. When possible, we will view video clips of the plays performed on stage. Applying theory of adaptation, we will think about how transference from the stage to the screen changes the dramatization. How do the director, adaptor, screen actors, and the medium of film itself alter the vision of the original work?

Students will be asked to write three short papers and a take-home final.

Plays and films covered in the course:

Much Ado about Nothing William Shakespeare/ Kenneth Branagh
An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde/ Oliver Parker
A Streetcar Named Desire Tennessee Williams/Elia Kazan
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Edward Albee/Mike Nichols
Amadeus Peter Shaffer/Milos Forman
Glengarry Glen Ross David Mamet/James Foley

ENGL 272-03W is a writing intensive class. 


Exploring Fiction (ENGL 273)

Section: 105 #1006
Instructor:  Peters, Esther
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 12:20 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., LSC

This instructor has not provided this course description

Section: 91W #2436
Instructor:  Meinhardt, Michael
3.0 credit hours Lecture
ONLINE

This online seminar establishes a foundation from which to ground, understand, situate, analyze, and perhaps even create contemporary short fiction (short stories). We will use both synchronous and asynchronous on-line contact with each other to explore the principles of fiction writing through a combination of lectures, craft analyses, writing exercises, assigned reading, in-class reading, discussion, and assigned writing projects. We will then explore a general critical sensibility of fiction writing, technique, and purpose using established writers’ stories and perspectives on craft. We will examine genre, structure and style as an avenue of interpretation, classification and creation. The final stage of the course focuses on analysis of value assessment for fiction in a contemporary setting, particularly within a capitalist structure.

ENGL 273-91W is a writing intensive and ONLINE class.


 Women in Literature (ENGL 283)

Section: 106 #1886
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 2:15 p.m. – 3:55 p.m., LSC


Human Values in Literature (ENGL 290)

Section: 92W #2438
Instructor:  Mann, H.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
ONLINE

This course will be taught exclusively online. The instruction will take place in bi-weekly synchronous online sessions, which will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. CST. (All sessions will be recorded, so that if you miss a class, you can listen to the recording later.)

The pre-requisite for this course is UCLR 100 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  There is no requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of English, Department of Classical Studies, or Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.  Further, this course satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and in Promoting Justice Values and 3 credits of the Writing Intensive requirement. In addition, the course counts as a 200-level elective for both the English major and minor and meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement of the English major.

Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, this section of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.

Assignments will include weekly written commentaries, a final exam, a research paper, and participation in the synchronous (online) class sessions.

ENGL 290-92W is a writing intensive class and ONLINE class.


Internship (ENGL 394)

[Prerequisite for ENGL 394 is permission]

Section: 02E #1017
Instructor: Cragwall, Jasper
3.0 credit hours Internship
  

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.  Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program.  Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples.  Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins.  Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.


Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399) 

Section: 107 # 1018
Instructor: Cragwall, Jasper
3.0 credit hours Lecture

Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.



GRADUATE COURSES

Pedagogy: Theory and Practice (ENGL 404)

Section:  800 #1019
Instructor:  Bradshaw, Melissa
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC

In this course we will be thinking intensely about teaching: what we teach, how we teach it, and the ways in which we assess what our students have learned. We will also be thinking about how we learned what we know, and how our understandings of the exchange between teachers and students have been shaped by cultural representations of teaching. More than simply content and technique, pedagogy constitutes a social and ethical practice in response to a wide range of influences that are not confined to the academy. This course takes a theoretical and historical, as well as practical approach to the subject; it is designed to make us reflect on how and why we teach as we do, and how we might teach differently. In this seminar we will read about various models of teaching (e.g. feminist, formalist, deconstructive, performative; the banking model and the conflicts model), and about the desires, anxieties, (hidden) agendas, and motivations that structure the pedagogical exchange. Readings will include theorists such as Pierre Bourdieu, Pamela Caughie, Paolo Friere, Henry Giroux, Gerald Graff, and bell hooks. Students will write a review essay, teaching statement, and a syllabus for a literature or theory course, as well do a presentation and/or a teaching demonstration.


Postcolonial Literature (ENGL 487)

Section:  805 #2440
Instructor:  Mann, Harveen
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.  LSC

This course traces the origins and key developments of postcolonial literature as well as postcolonial theory, with a view to investigating three of its major, current emphases: texts that have come to be regarded as "classics" in the field (for example, the works of Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, and Salman Rushdie); issues of Orientalism, gender and subalternity, hybridity, nationalism, and globalization raised by contemporary theorists and practitioners like Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Homi Bhabha, Partha Chatterjee, and Arjun Appadurai; and challenges to postcolonial studies on the grounds of its multiple definitions, its interdisciplinary reach, and the politics of its institutional location, among others.  To these ends, the course will investigate the following topics in the main:  

(a) the history of colonization,
(b) the institutional history, emergence, and definitions of postcolonial studies and literature,
(c) theories of resistance, including those of Negritude, anti-colonial violence, and cultural decolonization,
(d) metropolitan theorizing, for example that of ethnicity in Britain and of the settler communities in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada,
(e) colonial knowledge and power, gender and subalternity, hybridity, nationalism, and globalization, and
(f) the intersections of postcolonial literature and studies with other analyses of race, language, sexuality, nationalism, culture, religious fundamentalism, and diaspora, among others. 

A segment of the course will be devoted to readings of literary texts from particular postcolonial theoretical perspectives.  Therefore, in its dual emphasis--on postcolonial literature and theory--the course will meet the Modern and Contemporary Literature AND Critical Theory distribution requirements of the Ph.D. program in English. 


Topics in American Literature (ENGL 490)

Section:  806 #2441
Instructor:  Kerkering, Jack
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 3:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.  LSC

Nineteenth-Century American Poetry

This course examines the poetry of U.S. writers from the early nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Readings will include selected poems, related prose writings, recent criticism of these writers and their works, and theoretical accounts of poetics. Students will write annotations of criticism, make an oral presentation, write one short paper (5-6 pages) based on their oral presentation, and write a final seminar paper (12 pages). 



Summer 6W3 - (May 18, 2015 - June 26, 2015) 

Interpreting Literature (UCLR 100)

Section: 02L #2442
Instructor:  Bayley, Elisabeth
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TWR 10:45 a.m. – 12:55 p.m., Cuneo Mansion

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Margaret Edson, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four-page papers, and classroom participation.