Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Spring 2015 Courses

SPRING 2015 COURSES


Interpreting Literature (UCLR 100)

Section: 01L #5141
Instructor:  M. S. Conner
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 AM – 9:05 AM LSC

This course will provide a broad introductory survey African American literature from the 1700s to the present with particular emphasis on the 20th century.  We will examine social, political, and economic ramifications of race, gender, disability, and sexuality marginalization by asking:

What role has writing by African Americans played in the long fight for political freedom and equality? How has that writing changed over time—stylistically or otherwise—to reflect the different political needs of its historical moment? How has that writing been shaped by different ways of thinking about race? How has race, in turn, been shaped or constructed by that writing? And how do representations of gender and sexuality participate in a literary construction of race?

This course satisfies the first tier of Loyola University’s core Knowledge Area requirement in “Literary Knowledge.”

Section: 02L #4033
Instructor:  E. Peters
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 – 9:05 AM LSC

In this foundational course in literary studies we will explore the intersection of writing and madness in a broad range of prose, drama, and poetry.  We will examine how some texts represent the madness of the individual and others expose the madness of society.  Does writing exacerbate or ease the author’s experience of madness?  And where do we, the readers, fit into this process?  As we examine this connection between writing and madness we will also explore broader conceptual questions about literature itself.  What is literature? Why does it matter? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? To answer these questions and others, we will develop close reading skills, master key literary and critical terms, and investigate critical approaches to interpreting and analyzing literature.  For this course we will read short fiction by Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and others; poems by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and others; and plays by William Shakespeare, Zygmunt Krasinski, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckett. 

Section: 03L #4034
Instructor:  B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 AM – 10:10 AM LSC

This foundational course in literary studies will familiarize students with a range of genres including novels (fiction and non-fiction), poetry, drama and film.  Some of the questions we will consider are: What is literature?  Why does it matter? Where does meaning come from in literature? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect – and reflect on – questions of value and the diversity of human experience?  To explore these questions, this course will focus on literatures of self-making and self-invention from a range of perspectives including, but not limited to, self-help texts, advice columns, TED talks, and historical fiction. Authors will range from Benjamin Franklin and Frederick Douglass to Lorrie Moore and playwright Lynn Nottage. There will be several short writing assignments (1-2 pages), a mid-term and a final exam for this course.

Section: 04L #4035
Instructor:  S. Lahey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 – 10:10 AM LSC

This foundational course in literary studies examines a broad range of prose, poetry, and drama, all centered on the theme of courtship and its less distinguished counterpart: seduction. A concern of writers from Shakespeare to D. H. Lawrence, courtship often defines not only characters and their struggles but also literary form itself. The Elizabethan sonnet, for example, is a poetic form dedicated to celebrating or securing one’s love. Through a detailed analysis of the formal qualities of each work, we will master key literary and critical terms, and finally explore a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literature.

Readings will include: Pride and Prejudice, Much Ado About Nothing, and A Streetcar Named Desire. Selected poems from writers including Shakespeare, Browning, Wordsworth, Whitman, and Millay. Selected short stories from writers including Kate Chopin, D.H. Lawrence, and Raymond Carver. Assignments will include two exams, two short papers, and a class presentation.

Section: 05L #4036
Instructor:  M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 – 10:10 AM LSC

UCLR 100 had been designated as the foundational course in literary studies. This course will introduce students to representative texts of fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as to common literary and critical terms. Most importantly, it will teach them to use various modes of literary interpretation to discern how, in specific cases, imaginative writing illuminates human experience and delights its readers. In other words, a major objective of this course is to analyze works of literature and thereby to deepen both the insights and the pleasures to be derived from reading and analyzing those works. The course will carry out the time-honored mission of literary studies by demonstrating the power of fiction, poetry, and drama to instruct and delight. The readings—short stories, short poems, and plays-- will be mostly drawn from The Norton Introduction to Literature, edited by Kelly J. Mars (shorter 11th edition). There will be three short (c. 5pp.) critical papers, periodic quizzes, and a final exam.

Section: 06L #4037
Instructor:  B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 – 11:15 AM LSC

This foundational course in literary studies will familiarize students with a range of genres including novels (fiction and non-fiction), poetry, drama and film.  Some of the questions we will consider are: What is literature?  Why does it matter? Where does meaning come from in literature? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect – and reflect on – questions of value and the diversity of human experience?  To explore these questions, this course will focus on literatures of self-making and self-invention from a range of perspectives including, but not limited to, self-help texts, advice columns, TED talks, and historical fiction. Authors will range from Benjamin Franklin and Frederick Douglass to Lorrie Moore and playwright Lynn Nottage. There will be several short writing assignments (1-2 pages), a mid-term and a final exam for this course.

Section: 07L #4038
Instructor:  W. Peart
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 – 11:15 AM LSC

Regional and National Identity in U.S. Literature

By focusing on American regional and national identity, this core course in literature will familiarize students with the interpretation of a representative variety of American literary works within the historical contexts from which they arise. Colony and nation, North and South, urban and rural, modern and traditional, these dichotomies lie at the heart of the American national experience and have been central to how Americans identify themselves, sometimes by compromise and inclusion, oftentimes by violent separation. Through the vehicle of literature we will explore these oppositions and others, questioning along the way literature’s place in society, its significance for today, and how it has been conceived in different times and places. We will interrogate the relationships among author, text, and reader as we seek to determine where meaning comes from in literature. Grappling with these issues will help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner.

Section: 08L #4039
Instructor:  M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 – 11:15 AM LSC

UCLR 100 had been designated as the foundational course in literary studies. This course will introduce students to representative texts of fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as to common literary and critical terms. Most importantly, it will teach them to use various modes of literary interpretation to discern how, in specific cases, imaginative writing illuminates human experience and delights its readers. In other words, a major objective of this course is to analyze works of literature and thereby to deepen both the insights and the pleasures to be derived from reading and analyzing those works. The course will carry out the time-honored mission of literary studies by demonstrating the power of fiction, poetry, and drama to instruct and delight. The readings—short stories, short poems, and plays-- will be mostly drawn from The Norton Introduction to Literature, edited by Kelly J. Mars (shorter 11th edition). There will be three short (c. 5pp.) critical papers, periodic quizzes, and a final exam.

Section: 09L #4040
Instructor: E. Bayley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 PM LSC

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Margaret Edson, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four page papers, and classroom participation. 

Section: 10L #4041
Instructor:  L. Goldstein
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

In this course, we will read, discuss and write about a variety of literary genres. You will be introduced to multiple ways of approaching and interpreting texts ranging from ancient authors to contemporary ones, including traditional and experimental forms. Materials will include: The dramas Oedipus Rex, Othello and Venus, Fiction pieces Murders in the Rue Morgue, and Aquamarine, as well as a host of historical and contemporary poetry. Writing assignments include a short response, a midterm essay, and a final exam.

Section: 11L #4042
Instructor:  M. Conner
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

This course will provide a broad introductory survey African American literature from the 1700s to the present with particular emphasis on the 20th century.  We will examine social, political, and economic ramifications of race, gender, disability, and sexuality marginalization by asking:

What role has writing by African Americans played in the long fight for political freedom and equality? How has that writing changed over time—stylistically or otherwise—to reflect the different political needs of its historical moment? How has that writing been shaped by different ways of thinking about race? How has race, in turn, been shaped or constructed by that writing? And how do representations of gender and sexuality participate in a literary construction of race?

This course satisfies the first tier of Loyola University’s core Knowledge Area requirement in “Literary Knowledge.”

Section: 12L #4043
Instructor:  E. Bayley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM LSC

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Margaret Edson, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four page papers, and classroom participation. 

Section: 13L #4044
Instructor:  W. Farina
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

What is literature? What makes reading literature important or valuable? Are there techniques of reading and interpretation that anyone can learn and apply? In this class we'll study a wide range of literature (novels, poems, plays) with a view to understanding how to read it. We’ll be talking a lot about your sense perceptions of aesthetic form and the pleasure of communication, so say goodbye to close-reading anxiety. Course-requirements will include regular Sakai forum posting, two papers final paper and a final exam.

Section: 14L #4045
Instructor: S. Lahey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

This foundational course in literary studies examines a broad range of prose, poetry, and drama, all centered on the theme of courtship and its less distinguished counterpart: seduction. A concern of writers from Shakespeare to D. H. Lawrence, courtship often defines not only characters and their struggles but also literary form itself. The Elizabethan sonnet, for example, is a poetic form dedicated to celebrating or securing one’s love. Through a detailed analysis of the formal qualities of each work, we will master key literary and critical terms, and finally explore a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literature.

Readings will include: Pride and Prejudice, Much Ado About Nothing, and A Streetcar Named Desire. Selected poems from writers including Shakespeare, Browning, Wordsworth, Whitman, and Millay. Selected short stories from writers including Kate Chopin, D.H. Lawrence, and Raymond Carver. Assignments will include two exams, two short papers, and a class presentation.

Section: 15L #4046
Instructor: E. Peters
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

In this foundational course in literary studies we will explore the intersection of writing and madness in a broad range of prose, drama, and poetry.  We will examine how some texts represent the madness of the individual and others expose the madness of society.  Does writing exacerbate or ease the author’s experience of madness?  And where do we, the readers, fit into this process?  As we examine this connection between writing and madness we will also explore broader conceptual questions about literature itself.  What is literature? Why does it matter? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? To answer these questions and others, we will develop close reading skills, master key literary and critical terms, and investigate critical approaches to interpreting and analyzing literature.  For this course we will read short fiction by Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and others; poems by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and others; and plays by William Shakespeare, Zygmunt Krasinski, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckett. 

Section: 16L #4837
Instructor: T. Boyle
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 pm LSC

Section: 17L #4838
Instructor: D. Chinitz
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

This course will develop students' ability to analyze literature at the college level. The texts we discuss will vary across genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) and historical time periods. Authors likely to appear on the syllabus include Jane Austen, LeRoi Jones, James Joyce, Flannery O'Connor, Bernard Shaw, and Tennessee Williams, among others. The close-reading skills we practice will cultivate students' critical thinking, understanding of literary texts, and appreciation of the craft of writing.

Section: 18L #4843
Instructor: P. Sorenson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

Over the course of the semester, we will be exploring the three principal literary genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. We will emphasize the historical contexts in which these stories, poems, and plays were written, and we will examine a variety of critical postures with which to interpret these texts. Students will also be asked to establish their own claims by way of shorter responses and longer formal essays. As we read, we will always ask why literature matters: Why do we choose to read? What can stories or lyrics teach us? How does literature participate in the building of our cultural and individual points of view? Finally, the course’s theme is ugliness. Using some of Umberto Eco’s categories from On Ugliness, we will explore the meaning of ugliness and attempt to develop a clearer understanding of its uses, forms, and history. We will examine how ugliness evolved from the absence or inverse of beauty into its own autonomous thing. We will investigate ugliness’s relationship to art, ethics, evil, and the sublime. We will also try to understand why we are so consistently attracted to that which we find horrible. 

Section: 19L #5092
Instructor: J. Janangelo
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 PM LSC

In our course, we will cover a range of literary theories (including Marxist and Gender approaches) and apply them to selected literary texts including poems, novels, stories and plays. You will gain practice in literary analysis, close reading, and critical writing. There will be papers based on our course texts and class discussions. You will also give a class presentation.

Section: 20L #4047
Instructor: M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

This Core course is designed to introduce students to college-level literary studies.  Students will closely and carefully analyze a representative selection of works of prose, poetry, and drama, will master key literary and critical terms, and will explore a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature.  This class is a prerequisite for all second tier Core literature courses.

Section: 21L #5093
Instructor: J. Glover
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

This core course in literary studies will acquaint students with a representative variety of American prose, poetry, and drama.  It will introduce key literary and critical terms and explore a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of American literature.  What is literature?  Why does it matter?  How has it been conceived in different times and places? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, and reader or audience?  What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in the light of our own contemporary time?  Where does meaning come from in literature? Exploring these questions will help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

Section: 22L #4875
Instructor: P. Sorenson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

Over the course of the semester, we will be exploring the three principal literary genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. We will emphasize the historical contexts in which these stories, poems, and plays were written, and we will examine a variety of critical postures with which to interpret these texts. Students will also be asked to establish their own claims by way of shorter responses and longer formal essays. As we read, we will always ask why literature matters: Why do we choose to read? What can stories or lyrics teach us? How does literature participate in the building of our cultural and individual points of view? Finally, the course’s theme is ugliness. Using some of Umberto Eco’s categories from On Ugliness, we will explore the meaning of ugliness and attempt to develop a clearer understanding of its uses, forms, and history. We will examine how ugliness evolved from the absence or inverse of beauty into its own autonomous thing. We will investigate ugliness’s relationship to art, ethics, evil, and the sublime. We will also try to understand why we are so consistently attracted to that which we find horrible. 

Section: 23L #4876
Instructor: M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

In this course, we’ll examine a variety of prose, poetry, and drama from different historical periods in order to develop our abilities as close readers. We’ll ask and try to answer questions like the following: What is literature? Why does it matter? How has it been understood in different times and places? How do we envision the relationships among author, text, and reader? Throughout the course, we’ll think especially about the ways in which literary forms reflect—and reflect upon—particular historical conditions. Works will likely include plays by Euripides and Shakespeare, the poems of Wordsworth and Whitman, and novels by Woolf and Baldwin. Students will be required to write two papers, complete a number of reading quizzes, and take two exams.


Advanced Writing: Business (ENGL 210)

Section: 20W #1896
Instructor:  M. Danna
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM WTC

English 210 provides training and practice in various forms of writing (such as memos, instructions, letters, resumes, proposals, and reports) relevant to students who are considering careers in business. 

Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate familiarity with genres and styles of writing commonly used in business, with the stages of the writing process, and with individual and collaborative methods of composing.

Section: 60W #1897
Instructor:  J. Woods
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM WTC

English 210 establishes more than fundamental writing skills for business applications; this course creates a foundation for effective communication, collaboration, and interaction in business and professional settings. This is a writing intensive course, and is also designed to help you better understand the “ins and outs” of business communication. This course builds a range of awareness for specific writing forms, expectations, and goals using specific strategies and techniques. Furthermore, the tasks designed to explore these forms use real-world application, by using interactive exercises, peer feedback, collaborative writing activities, and materials from current or recent professional positions. By the end of the semester, you will become more efficient and proficient in planning and producing business correspondence and reports designed to accomplish your goals as well as the goals of your organization. Specifically, you will develop skills in the following areas:

Theory

  • Analyzing the needs, goals, and expectations of multiple audiences

Methods

  • Conducting both primary and secondary research about a professional writing problem at an actual work site
  • Participating actively in collaborative projects to gain experience with team writing, which is becoming more common-and more important-in business context

 Practice

  • Resolving business problems with clear, informative, persuasive, well-designed, and highly readable business documents
  • Creating a recommendation report
  • Supplementing that report with a well-organized presentation
  • Integrating informative and persuasive visuals with written text

Situational Assessment is a process of research and consideration that must be done in order to determine goals, recognize obstacles, clarify intent, identify appropriate measures (form/genre – i.e. A Courteous Bad-News Letter, Executive Summary, or Application Letter), and then clarify purposes.

Determining Purpose is the second step, wherein the writer uses the awareness gained from Situational Assessment to then select the most capable measure, order the priorities, and form the writing project around the specific expectations of the measure and the number of priorities.

Section: 61W #2935
Instructor:  M. Danna
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM WTC

English 210 provides training and practice in various forms of writing (such as memos, instructions, letters, resumes, proposals, and reports) relevant to students who are considering careers in business. 

Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate familiarity with genres and styles of writing commonly used in business, with the stages of the writing process, and with individual and collaborative methods of composing.

Section: 62W #3396
Instructor:  J. Janangelo
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM WTC

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group presentation. Our course is writing intensive.


Writing for Pre-Law Students (ENGL 211)

Section: 63W #1898
Instructor:  D. Gorski
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM WTC

In this course, students will learn to develop the writing skills used by law school students and attorneys to prepare case briefs, office memoranda, and pre-trial motions. Students will also learn how to answer essay examination questions of the type given in law school and on a state bar examination. In class, students will develop the verbal abilities necessary to take a legal position and defend it with statements of facts and conclusions of law. Realistic hypothetical fact patterns will be analyzed using the IRAC method: issue, rule, application, and conclusion. Learning how to cite to legal authorities is a central part of the course. Readings include judicial opinions, state and federal statutes, and law review articles. The course is taught by a practicing attorney, and assumes no prior legal studies by the students. 

Section: 64W #6217
Instructor: J. Hovey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM WTC

Writing and textual analysis are essential for lawyers no matter what area of practice they choose. This course focuses on the rhetoric of law and the ways that legal texts create a culture and establish relationships through the language and argument. This course provides an opportunity for you to work on reading legal opinions, and to work on your writing as you select a Supreme Court Opinion to analyze over the course of the term. We will be especially interested in how American legal opinions create "justice" (or don't!), and how they define important terms like “evidence” or “rights.” The end result of the semester will be a long paper where you look at the rhetorical devices that help construct a legal opinion, and you make arguments about those devices and the effect they have on fairness and justice.


Theory Practicum Tutoring Writing (ENGL 220)

Section: 1WE #3397
Instructor:  A. Kessel
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM WTC

English 220 is a seminar designed to prepare students to serve as tutors in the Loyola University Chicago Writing Center. This course is open to students from all majors who have a passion for clear written communication. We will explore the theory and practice of peer tutoring through reading, discussion, and practical experience. A writing center is an organic intellectual community, in that tutoring involves an impromptu meeting between two writers who think together about clear expression. In this course you will not only learn how to help others improve their writing, but you will also improve your own writing and critical thinking skills. You will become part of a vibrant community of fellow peer tutors while gaining experience that will serve you in a variety of careers. The service-learning component consists of approximately 20-25 hours of observation and tutoring in the Writing Center and a small- group project aimed at enhancing the Center’s services.


Exploring Poetry (ENGL 271)

Section: 02W #5111
Instructor: J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

This class will provide an introduction to the understanding and analysis of poetry through the study of a wide range of poems in English.  We will consider various motives for writing and reading poetry, and various methods of reading it.    Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class.  Requirements will include participation in class discussions, several papers, and a final.

Section: 03W #5112
Instructor:  J. Cragwall
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

Why should we care about poetry—and how should we care about it?  And why do the answers to these two questions seem so similar?  We’ll start historically—who before us cared about poetry, and why?  We’ll study the pressure poems put on their historical moment, and how they’re shaped by it in surprising ways: for example, our discussion of Shakespeare will start with the formation of “Shakespeare” as a figure, often at odds with the “evidence” of the poems, of canonical standards throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a program that affected even the spelling of his poems.  Most of the authors in our anthology were white, male, and rich—how has literature been used to promote a series of questions and assumptions that they may have shared (sometimes called “the canon”), and how has it, even in these same authors, blown apart all the stereotypes and orthodoxies we’d expect to find?  We’ll watch the invention not only of English (and then British) culture, but of the English language itself, its twists and triumphs, detours and degenerations—and most importantly, we’ll watch as language, especially literary language, is fashioned into the greatest vehicle of social (as well as aesthetic) contest.  Papers, exams, medicinal leeches.

Section: 043 #5109
Instructor:  J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 PM LSC

This class will provide an introduction to the understanding and analysis of poetry through the study of a wide range of poems in English.  We will consider various motives for writing and reading poetry, and various methods of reading it.  Requirements will include participation in class discussions, papers, and a final.

Section: 044 #5110
Instructor:  J. Hastings
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

This course will focus primarily on epic poetry.  I have chosen this for a pair of reasons.  First, because epics are narrative poetry, their plots allow for an easy entry into discussion of the works, enabling a more sophisticated interpretation through deeper analysis.  Second, many of the epics we will read have proven to be among the most influential pieces of literature.  Consequently, focusing on these epics not only affords a deeper understanding of chronology but also, because we will consider later adaptations of them, will allow to explore in some depth the way genre itself effects and affects meaning-making as we engage with literature.

Texts to be read include:

Atwood, Margaret.  The Penelopiad.  Canongate Myths Series.  Edinburgh: Canongate, 2006.  Print.
Beowulf.  Beowulf: A Dual-Language Edition. Howell Chickering, trans and ed. New York: Anchor, 1977. Print.
Chaucer, Geoffrey.  The Knight’s Tale.  Electronic resource.
Dante.  Inferno.  Ciaran Carson, trans.  New York: New York Review Books Classics, 2004.
——-Paradise.  Anthony Esolen, trans.  Modern Library Classics.  New York: Randon House, 2013.
Homer. The Odyssey. Robert Fitzgerald, trans. New York: MacMillan/Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1998. Print.
Milton, John.  Paradise Lost. Oxford: Oxford World Classics, 2008.  Print. 
Pope, Alexander.  The Rape of the Lock.  Electronic resource.
Vergil.  The Aeneid.  Robert Fitzgerald, trans.  New York: Vintage Classics.  1990.  Print.

Section: 04W #5113
Instructor:  J. Jacobs
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

This course is not intended to turn people into poetry scholars.  I hope it will help them find the freedom to be poetry readers.  It is designed to lead people to discover: how to engage a poem directly, how to have fun with poetry, how to get at the kinds of pleasures it offers, how to use poetry as a tool for looking at one’s own life and experience.

I require students to have their own copy of one of the major collections with poems from many periods, the NORTON ANTHOLOGY (5th full edition, not the Shorter Edition).  But we will stress modern writers.  We may supplement the anthology with a short collection by a single author.  Three main papers will be required, plus a final exam.  I may make extended comments, but I won’t lecture.  Students should be willing to “risk” entering discussion  actively, engaging each other in understanding shared readings.

Section: 05W #5114
Instructor:  J. Nemec
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM PM LSC

What do Taylor Swift and Dr. Seuss have in common? Exactly: they are both terrible poets. In ENGL 271-05W, by using an analytical approach driven by curiosity, you will explore how even seemingly benign questions like this one might not be dismissed with such easy answers. The course requires you to read closely and actively, with the goal of learning the vocabulary of poetic analysis in order to use it productively in your writing. Since ours is Writing Intensive course, you will composing and revising in a number of different modes, from short in-class writing to longer researched essays. You will also be challenged to set and measure your own goals for the course, to determine how the study of poetry can help you develop critical skills for your particular field of study at Loyola and beyond. And with a little hard work, you’ll not only find a new favorite poet, you’ll also be able to talk intelligently about that poet at parties.


Exploring Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 045 #2649
Instructor:  T. Boyle
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

Section: 06W #1396
Instructor:  T. Boyle
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC


Exploring Fiction (ENGL 273)

Section: 046 #2417
Instructor:  K. Quirk
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 PM LSC

The origins, history, forms, and social uses of the novel and autobiography overlap and intersect. Many classic novels take the form of fictionalized autobiographies, while the genre of autobiography has always employed what are often labeled “fictional” techniques to tell a life story. In this course we will read autobiographical novels and a few innovative autobiographies in order to study the ways writers use fictional and autobiographical forms to examine the individual self, interpret experience, explore identity, and negotiate one’s place in society. Class discussion and writing assignments will often ask students to perform fairly traditional literary analysis. However, we will also “practice” the arts we study. In other words, writing assignments will include creative exercises in which students write both autobiographical and fictional pieces, many of which will be ungraded. The assumption underlying this is that we discover more about the forms we study by actually trying our hand at those forms. Assignments will be many but generally short. Readings may include work by Tim O’Brien, Norman Mailer, Alexander Hemon, Maya Angelou, Alison Bechdel, Maxine Hong Kingston, Frederick Exley, Sylvia Plath, and others.

Section: 047 #2936
Instructor:  D. Burke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM LSC

Whether you grew up in Chicago, China, or Cameroon, the fact is you (and I) are here now – a semi-permanent part of the academic, cultural, and natural environment of Rogers Park, and Loyola’s Lake Shore Campus.  And as we’ll learn over the spring semester, where you are can have a profound effect upon who you are.  We’ll look at a range of literary and historical texts that reveal the history and culture of this city’s ecology, and (re?)define how we understand our role within it. 

Together, we’ll read samples of all kinds of literature (poetry, fiction, drama, nature writing, etc) and discuss where and how to extract meaning from those texts in ways that can apply to our own contemporary lives.  Like most of your English teachers past, present, and future, I'd simply like to give you another way of looking at the world around you - and I plan to use literature, ecology, guided self-reflection, and my own abundant enthusiasm to do it.  “Allons! whoever you are come travel with me!” (Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road”)

Class work will include 2-3 papers, a midterm, a final, and a few short outdoor excursions.

Section: 048 #5115
Instructor:  J. Frey
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 – 9:45 AM LSC

Exploring Fiction: The Unreliable Narrator; or, Trust No One. This course will examine the formal elements of narration, focalization, and personae through the trope of the unreliable narrator in fiction. The formal and thematic inquiries for the texts we read will revolve around these questions: What makes a narrator trustworthy or not? Are all narrators, in some way, liars? Is there such a thing as truth in a fictional world? How does the way a story is told inherently shape the story itself? We will explore such questions by focusing on close reading as well as comparisons between texts. This approach to fiction will encourage us to use analytical skills in order to play literary detective: examining the evidence in front of us—the words on the page—with a skepticism of the motivation, knowledge, and values guiding those literary choices in order to arrive at an interpretation. We will primarily read 20th century novels, but we will briefly trace this trope through medieval, early modern, and 19th century texts as well. We will read: Dante’s Inferno, an excerpt from Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Edgar Allen Poe’s “Cask of Amontillado”, William Faulkner’s The Sound and The Fury, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, a selection of short stories from Jorge Luis Borges, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. Requirements for this class include weekly reading guides, three short (3-5 page) papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Section: 049 #5116
Instructor: N. Jung
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 – 9:45 AM LSC

This course has two objectives. First, we will explore “identities in motion” through literary readings that focus on the causes and effects of modern migration practices. To this end, we will discuss the impact of multicultural contacts and collisions on our governing assumptions about individual and national identity, and political sovereignty. Second, we will approach these questions via the problematic genre of the “short story cycle,” or “novel-in-stories.” Through critical readings and case studies, we will try to explain the immense popularity of this genre for contemporary writers dealing with issues of global movement. And in so doing, we will confront the thorny literary questions of structure and genre raised by such a hybrid form. Texts will include works by Junot Díaz, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, Aleksandar Hemon, Wayson Choy, and David Bezmozgis. Students will be graded based on a midterm exam, a final exam, a group presentation, reading responses, short quizzes, and a final research paper.

Please note that this section of the course meets the multicultural requirement of the English major.

Section: 056 #5544
Instructor: K. Quirk
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 – 9:05 AM LSC

The origins, history, forms, and social uses of the novel and autobiography overlap and intersect. Many classic novels take the form of fictionalized autobiographies, while the genre of autobiography has always employed what are often labeled “fictional” techniques to tell a life story. In this course we will read autobiographical novels and a few innovative autobiographies in order to study the ways writers use fictional and autobiographical forms to examine the individual self, interpret experience, explore identity, and negotiate one’s place in society. Class discussion and writing assignments will often ask students to perform fairly traditional literary analysis. However, we will also “practice” the arts we study. In other words, writing assignments will include creative exercises in which students write both autobiographical and fictional pieces, many of which will be ungraded. The assumption underlying this is that we discover more about the forms we study by actually trying our hand at those forms. Assignments will be many but generally short. Readings may include work by Tim O’Brien, Norman Mailer, Alexander Hemon, Maya Angelou, Alison Bechdel, Maxine Hong Kingston, Frederick Exley, Sylvia Plath, and others.

Section: 07W #5117
Instructor: J. Kerkering
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 – 11:15 AM LSC

This course examines works by important novelists from the late nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. Class discussions will address formal and thematic features of these writings. Based on these discussions, students will write papers that draw upon the readings to support original and consequential interpretations. 

Section: 08W #5118
Instructor: E. Bayley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 – 9:05 AM LSC

Literature can often times serve to question identity. It asks who we are as readers, and it asks us to question certain aspects of culture, society, individuality, etc. As such, it has the ability to provoke us to anger, to action, and to empathy. We form our identity through our interactions with the world, and reading literature can be one of those interactions and further, can assist us in understanding the multiple interactions around us. For the purposes of this course, personal identity and the way fiction questions the construction of our identities will be the core theme we explore together. We will do so by looking at a number of theoretical approaches to interpreting literature, such as those found in the spiritual, psychological, theoretical, and philosophical readings of shorter literary texts. The texts we will be looking at will include mostly shorter works by American authors, such as Sherman Alexie, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Alice Walker, and ZZ Packer, just to name a few. Further, this course will help students identify some of the basic vocabulary used to describe and understand fiction (such as plot, character, theme, voice, etc). By the end of the course students will have gained a better understanding of how to read and analyze fiction through being able to form questions concerning identity and the formation of identity, both within texts and for the reader. The method of assessment will include (but is not limited to) three, five page papers that will be due throughout the course, three reflection papers, quizzes, and classroom participation.


Exploring Shakespeare (ENGL 274)

Section: 09W #5119
Instructor: T. Kaminski
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 PM LSC

This class is intended to introduce students to the works of Shakespeare. We will read a selection of comedies and tragedies, focusing primarily on the way Shakespeare developed his plots, mingled humor and pathos, and created complex characters. We will pay special attention to Shakespeare's language, which is often difficult, but which repays the effort of reading it through its great richness of images and ideas. But we will also devote a considerable amount of class time to looking at scenes from the plays on video and talking about issues related to performing the plays. We will never lose sight of the fact that Shakespeare wrote for the stage, not for the page. Since this is a Writing Intensive course, students may be expected to do some in-class writing, to critique the papers of other students, and to work on revising their own essays. Assignments will include a reading quiz on each play, two papers, and a final exam.

Section: 10W #5120
Instructor:  M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

The course will cover a representative sampling of 7-8 plays, chosen to illustrate early, middle, and late phases of Shakespeare’s work in comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. We will look at such matters as language, poetry, historical contexts, and sources, but there will be a consistent emphasis on the plays as texts for theatrical performance. That is to say, we will discuss stage history and adaptations and look at video clips of recorded productions. Students will be required act in one in-class workshop production of a short scene. The primary text is The Necessary Shakespeare (Pearson/Longman). There will be quizzes, papers, a midterm, and a final. Inasmuch as this course is designated as Writing Intensive, there will be occasional writing exercises, some discussion of writing issue during class, and required revisions.

Section: 11W #5121
Instructor:  M. Shapiro
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM LSC

(As above.)


African-American Literature (ENGL 282)

Section: 050 #3399
Instructor:  E. Stogner
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

This course will offer a historical survey of the African American literary tradition, beginning with the colonization of the New World and extending through Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will examine a range of spoken and print texts, including slave narratives, speeches, songs, fiction, and folk tales. Through these texts, we will encounter and discuss important topics in African American literature; these will include (but are not limited to) black/white identities and passing; African American participation in political rhetoric; intersections of blackness, class, and gender; bodily bondage, violence, and trauma; and, the relationship between black art and popular culture. Students will be required to read all assigned texts and participate in class discussions; participation will be assessed using discussions, quizzes, intermittent response papers, and online postings. Major assignments include two formal essays (4-5 pages each), a class presentation, and a final exam.

Section: 081 #5507
Instructor:  S. Polen
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 – 12:20 PM LSC

How do we define African American literature? How has that definition changed throughout history? What is the future of African American literature? This course surveys major periods in African American literary history: slave narratives of the 18th and 19th century; the early 20th century and Harlem Renaissance; mid-20th century realism and the Black Arts Movement; and contemporary representations (and complications) of race. We will look at the rhetorical strategies of these writers, the political and social issues of the periods, and the creation and canonization of African American Literature. Course assignments will include two short papers, a long final paper, a midterm, and a final. 

This course is a Tier II CORE course in Literary Knowledge and Experience. It is also a 200-level elective for the English major/minor and meets the multicultural requirement of the major.


Women in Literature (ENGL 283)

Section: 051 #3401
Instructor:  M. Harmon
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 – 9:45 AM LSC

“Silly Novels by Lady Novelists are a genus with many species,” proclaimed the novelist Mary Ann Evans under the guise of her male-sounding pen name, George Eliot. Such works, she claimed, were “frothy …prosy, …pious [and] pedantic” in style and subject matter. Yet, even as she criticized “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists”, George Eliot was one of many Victorian women writers who produced anything but silly works. Indeed, like Emily Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Christina Rossetti, her works took on the era’s most important and high-stakes issues such as religion, social justice, education, community, romance, and poetics. But as women of this period strove to claim new subjects for female writers, they were often forced to invent cunning strategies like Eliot’s in order to navigate the male-dominated world of Victorian publishing. This course examines the literary accomplishments of these women and the ways in which they address women’s changing roles in Victorian society. Course readings will include major Victorian novels such as Wuthering Heights, Villette, Middlemarch, and North and South in addition to selections from Rossetti’s poetry. Class engagement will involve close reading in the course’s four novels (roughly 100-150 pages of material per class period), preparing students for rich explorations in unique and profound issues faced by Victorian women.

Section: 052 #5122
Instructor:  K. Dyson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 PM LSC
Fashioning the Self: Women in 20th Century Literature

“That was her self – pointed; dart-like; definite. That was her self when some effort, some call on her to be her self, drew the parts together, she alone knew how different, how incompatible and composed so for the world only into one centre, one diamond, one woman…” Like Clarissa Dalloway gazing in the mirror in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, in this course, we’ll ask how we come to recognize the self and what it’s composed of. We will explore the ways women work with and against social norms, political possibilities, and material culture to fashion their public persona and private self. We will look at twentieth century literature, art, and film in order to ask how language and culture shape female bodies, desire, and consciousness. We will also grapple more broadly with the relationship between gender and subjectivity and its consequences for how we relate to the world and the people in it. Texts may include Edith Wharton's House of Mirth, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, and Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar as well as short fiction by James Joyce and William Faulkner and films like It (1927), Red-Headed Woman (1932), and Rear Window (1954). Requirements will likely include brief quizzes, two short papers (4-6 pages) and one longer paper (8-12 pages), and a presentation.

Section: 053 #5123
Instructor:  J. Bouson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

“If women have learned many of the ways they interpret their lives from the narrative schemata of novels and stories,” writes Joanne Fry, “they can also gain from fiction new insights into the narrative processes of constructing meaning.”  Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core.  Focusing on literature written by 20th- and  21st-century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts. Analyzing representative works of fiction written by women authors, this course will investigate the important cultural and gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, the female body, romantic love, mother-child relationships,  female friendships, and female aging in their works.  The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, and May Sarton.  There will be quizzes, papers, a midterm and a final exam.

Section: 054 #5124
Instructor:  S. Eilefson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

As Sayre P. Sheldon notes, “Women have written about war as long as there has been writing…Yet war literature is still seen as almost exclusively male.” We will examine this contention and the role of women in war-making and war writing through short stories, novels, films and a graphic novel of the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries.

We will look at representations—by both men and women—of women in WWI, WWII, Vietnam and contemporary conflicts. We will analyze literature's form, voice, and purpose and will learn to contextualize fiction in its particular political, ethical, social and technological era. Requirements include two short (4 pp) papers, one long (8 pp) final paper, which will have a small research component, and a midterm. Potential texts include Rebecca West’s Return of the Soldier, Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway, Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis as well as Courage Under Fire, Atonement, and Poster Girl. This course is cross-listed with the Women’s Studies and Gender Studies department and the Peace Studies program.

Section: 13W #5125
Instructor:  M. Bradshaw
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM LSC

Revered and reviled, imitated and appropriated, divas are perhaps the most visible women in our culture. The diva represents empowerment: she is loud, courageous, and often outrageous. But her power can come at a great cost. Consumed and absorbed into people’s lives, the diva risks becoming the object of obsessive fandom, because in shaping her own identity, she often serves as a vehicle for shaping others’.  This class uses fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, film, and performance theory to explore the paradoxes and problems of the “woman with a voice” and her place in contemporary conceptions of femininity. Texts include Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera; Cather, The Song of the Lark; McNally, Master Class, Wilson, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom; and articles on blues and jazz singers, divas of the Arab world, divas and queer identities, and individual performers, such as Celia Cruz, Maria Callas, Fairuz, Britney Spears, and Madonna. Students will write several short (3-4 page) papers and a 7-10 page final paper.


Religion and Literature (ENGL 287)

Section: 055 #4059

Instructor:  M. Murphy
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

This course has a twofold objective: 1) to explore the many ways which religious ideas and practices appear in various genres of literature, and 2) to examine how literary, poetic, dramatic, and cinematic texts serve as a basis for religious inquiry.  By contemplating ancient, classic, and contemporary works, students will encounter a broad array of literary art shaped by the religious experience—in impulse, imagination, reflection and vision. While the course explores texts inspired by Catholic Christianity (as this is the professor’s scholarly competence), significant attention will be devoted to literary texts in the Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu traditions as well. No specialized knowledge of any of these traditions is presumed; the necessary background will be presented in the lectures. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature and develop further vocabularies for constructive engagement in literary and textual studies.

Required Texts:

  1. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, Dover (978-0486282114)
  2. Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies, Mariner (78-0395927205)
  3. Cynthia Ozick, The Shawl, Vintage (978-0679729266)
  4. Cormac McCarthy, The Road, Vintage (978-0307387899)
  5. Flannery O'Connor, The Complete Stories, FSG (978-0374515362)
  6. Mahmood Jamal (ed.), Islamic Mystical Poetry, Penguin Classics (978-0140424737)
  7. George Saunders, Tenth of December, Random House (978-0812993806)
  8. David Lodge, Therapy, Penguin (978-0140249002)
  9. We will also be reading and consulting other texts— supplied by your instructor and/or available online via Sakai.

Nature in Literature (ENGL 288)

Section: 14W #2054
Instructor:  S. Masello
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

 “The Lakota was a true naturist—a lover of Nature.  He loved the earth and all things of the   earth, the attachment growing with age.”   

Luther Standing Bear (1868-1939)

In this course we will focus on many of those writers we associate with “nature writing,” both in poetry and prose. We will read a wide and diverse selection of prose writers covering a span of more than two centuries. Writers may include, among others, Meriwether Lewis, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles Darwin, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), John Muir, Luther Standing Bear, Virginia Woolf, Isak Dinesen, Aldo Leopold, E.B. White, N. Scott Momaday, Annie Dillard and Barry Lopez.  The poetry selections will include works by William Wordsworth, Gerard Manley Hopkins,  Robert Frost, and other “nature poets.” 

Outcome:  Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the representation of “nature” in the poetry and prose in various periods of literary history and diverse cultural contexts.

Required Textbooks:

Finch and Elder, eds.  The Norton Book of Nature Writing (2002 edition).
Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost (St. Martin’s Griffin).

I will also assign a number of web-hosted readings for class discussion and writing topics.

Course Requirements: Class meetings will be devoted to discussion and analysis of the readings.  Students are expected to complete the reading assignments and to participate in class discussions.  Three brief essays will be required.  Students will keep weekly journal entries on the assigned poetry and prose. 

Students will also be required to memorize one poem by an assigned author.  Quizzes on the readings will be routinely given.  Students must “save” or keep a Xerox copy of all essays turned in.

Grading:          

Grades will be based primarily upon the papers and, to a lesser degree, on quizzes.  (Quizzes may not be made up.)  Class participation and attendance will significantly influence the professor’s grading decisions, particularly in borderline cases.

Please note:  a “C” grade is the University norm; a “C” grade indicates satisfactory work at the college level.  If a student’s work consistently exceeds the basic requirements of satisfactory work, a “B” grade will be assigned.  An “A” grade is awarded for outstanding academic performance.

Late Papers:

All papers are due on the date assigned.  Late papers will receive a penalty grade, unless the professor has granted an extension.

Acknowledgement of Sources:

All work handed in must be the author’s own, and if portions of the material or thought come from other sources, due credit must be given in writing and in proper form.  Dishonesty in any form, whether in tests or in submitting assignments that are not wholly the student’s own, will be dealt with severely.  A student may be dropped from the course with an “F” for any such dishonesty.

All Loyola University Chicago policies regarding academic dishonesty, special accommodations for students with disabilities, and absences due to religious observances will be adhered to throughout the course.


Human Values in Literature (ENGL 290)

Section: 057 #3405
Instructor: A. Cooperrider
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 – 9:45 AM LSC

Social class is a timeless feature of human societies; it has often changed forms, but has remained a vital if sometimes under-recognized part of both individual identity and political and economic structures. In this course we will examine how literature depicts class status as an essentially human value. How have our values as a society impacted the way social classes have been formed throughout history? How does the individual’s class status influence their personal values? Why do we place so much emphasis on class, even if we don’t realize it? Using Karl Marx’s theories of social class as a starting framework, we will discuss how literature attempts to answer these questions. We will read works from Chaucer and Shakespeare to Dickens and J.K. Rowling, among others, to get a sense of how conceptions of social class have changed—or not—over time. Graded work will include occasional quizzes, a midterm and final exam, and two short (3-4 pg.) papers.

Section: 15W #5126
Instructor: H. Mann
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

This section of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature.


Please note that this course is Writing Intensive; satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum requirements in Literary Knowledge and in Promoting Justice Values; counts as a 200-level elective for both the English major and minor; and meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement of the English major.

Section: 604 #3406
Instructor: M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

What is a person? Is a person a rational animal, or one defined by its power to feel, to sympathize, to love? Are there degrees of personhood? What is the difference between a person and a machine? Could a machine ever be a person? How has literature shaped the way we see the relationship between persons and machines? In this course, we will explore these questions by reading the works of Elizabethan playwrights, 18th century sentimentalists, Romantic poets, modern novelists, and 21st century philosophers. In addition to other course requirements, students will be required to write two papers.


English Grammar (ENGL 303)

Section: 058 #2423
Instructor: A. Kessel
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

Humans are language-producing animals, so in a sense our language is something we already “know.” But do we understand how it really works? The goal of this course is to analyze the structure of that language, to unlock the secrets behind the meaning we produce innately. We will explore English grammar not only as a list of rules and regulations that govern linguistic behavior, but also as a means of clearly conveying ideas in speech and writing.  This course will examine all elements of English grammar from parts of speech and how they function in a sentence to punctuation and how it enhances clear and precise prose.  We will also gain an appreciation for the English language and investigate techniques for using language effectively in speech and writing. This course is required for students planning to teach high school English, but it is also open to others. 


World Literature in English (ENGL 312)

Section: 060 #5127
Instructor: P. Jay
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

The German writer, critic, and statesman Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is now acknowledged to have been way ahead of his time when, in 1827, he wrote in a letter to a friend that “national literature is now a rather unmeaning term; the epoch of world literature is at hand.” In our own time the disruptive effects of colonialism, the rise of postcolonial nations, voluntary and forced migration facilitated by new technologies of travel, the development of world-wide diaspora communities, and the dramatically uneven effects of globalization have rendered national borders way more permeable than Goethe could ever have imagined. The effect of these combined changes on both the nature and production of literature in English has been profound, and in this course we'll explore some of them by reading a range of contemporary writers working in English from various parts of the globe. Some of the authors we will be reading include Chimamanda Adichie and Teju Cole (Nigeria), Aleksander Hemon (Bosnia), Kiran Desai (India), Junot Díaz (Dominican Republic/US), Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan), and Zadie Smith (Britain). This is a seminar so regular participation in class discussion is a must. Assignments will include two short critical essays and a longer final paper.

Please note that this section of the course meets the multicultural requirement of the English major.


The Writing of Poetry (ENGL 317)

Section: 061 #1471
Instructor: L. Goldstein
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We will read a wide range of mostly contemporary poetry in order to discuss its role as a cultural form of expression and its multiple manifestations as an art form. Readings include experimental verse, prose poetry, hybrid writing, and digital literature, all meant to encourage the young writer to consider different avenues of creativity and expression that could benefit their own writing. The workshop element of the course includes prompts for writing in class and between classes, presentations of student poetry to the group with the expectation of respectful and productive responses that will encourage writers to build upon their ideas for subject, form, and style, and in-class collective writing experiments. Students produce a final collection of poetry presented as a self-published chapbook in a final reading.

Section: 062 #1472
Instructor: M. Meinhardt
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

This workshop explores elemental and stylistic factors in first reading and explicating, and ultimately the writing of poetry. Students will learn genre nuances with history, form and constraint; students will then use this evolving awareness to create a portfolio of invested and revised original and significant work, as well as to communicate and collaborate with colleagues toward the same end. This course fosters a community of writers committed to the potential of the craft, including the vocabulary, criticism, analysis, creation, revision, publication, and extended opportunities for supporters of poetry. 

Section: 605 #3408
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

This course offers practice and instruction in the techniques and analysis of poetry through reading, writing, discussing, and revising poems. We will give particular attention to the unique challenges and opportunities  facing  beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term.


The Writing of Fiction (ENGL 318)

Section: 063 #1473
Instructor: B. Harper
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

This course will explore a wide variety of narrative styles as a means to consider how stories are built. Students will read fiction by established masters as well as contemporary practitioners, across a range of forms from traditional short stories to short-short and micro-narratives. In discussion, we will isolate and examine the basic elements of story craft—point of view, pacing, character development, etc.—in an effort to define the ways in which a good narrative impacts its audience, from plot concept to word choice. Over the course of the semester, the conversation will turn inward, as students submit several of their own works of fiction for consideration in workshop.

Section: 064 #3409
Instructor: A. McOmber
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction in a supportive, workshop environment through a. Reading and discussing master writers; b. Writing three original stories; and c. Having these stories discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by fellow writers. Class participation is emphasized.  Students will also undertake several brief writing “experiments” throughout the semester to expand their sense of the possibilities in fiction.  Readings will be drawn from a wide variety of genres, including contemporary realism and more speculative work, such as neo-fabulism.

Section: 606 #3410
Instructor: B. Hurley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM LSC

“Above all, in the most silent hour of your night, ask yourself: Must I write? [...] If you can confidently meet this serious question with a simple, “I must,” then build your life upon it. It has become your necessity. Your life, even in the most mundane and insignificant hour, must become a sign, a testimony to this urge.” -Rainer Maria Rilke

What makes a story?  What makes a character?  And what makes us want to read more of our favorite fiction?  In this class, we’ll explore the elements of memorable fiction, including character, story structure, and use of detail.  Through readings and discussions, we’ll cover how to turn short pieces into longer ones, and how to make writing bold, vital, and realistic.  We will work with short stories, one-act plays, and novels, and try our hand at all of these forms.  This is a workshop for students’ original work and a course on craft, not a literary criticism course.  The semester’s work will culminate in a final portfolio with revised short works and chapters of a novel.


Writing Creative Nonfiction (ENGL 319)

Section: 065 #2425
Instructor: S. Weller
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

Over the course of our 15-week semester, we will explore a style and genre of writing known as creative nonfiction. In this class, we will be reading and writing a wide range of creative nonfiction essays. We’ll discuss craft and narrative approaches, the use of setting, scenes, dialogue, description, and observation as well as point of view, tone, and style. You’ll read, analyze, and discuss the works of contemporary creative nonfiction writers as models for your own writing. We will do in-class writing exercises to get you going on drafts of your own work.  This is a workshop class, so we will also be responding to each other’s work, providing the writer with an attentive audience, and cultivating analytical skills and sensitivity as readers.  The goal of this class is to learn the building blocks of creative nonfiction, and how to put that knowledge into practice by crafting your own pieces of writing. You’ll also learn to offer thoughtful commentary on the work of your classmates.  You’ll learn about research, structure, craft, and revision.  Overall, the goal of this course will be to discover your own stories and interests, and to develop a lens, a style, and a voice with which to create art out of facts.


Chaucer (ENGL 322)

Section: 066 #3137
Instructor: E. Wheatley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 PM LSC

This course will focus on some of the most important poems of Geoffrey Chaucer, including dream visions, and a selection of The Canterbury Tales. We will also read works important to Chaucer, such as Macrobius’ writings on dreams, and some of his likely source texts. Critical readings will engage with these works in their historical and literary-historical contexts. Students will learn Middle English grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The grade will be based on class participation, weekly responses, two essays, a mid-term pronunciation exam, a mid-term translation exam, and a final exam.


Plays of Shakespeare (ENGL 326)

Section: 067 #1479
Instructor: V. Strain
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

In numerous works that mastered and innovated the literary forms trending in the late sixteenth century, Shakespeare probed the major cultural and political topics of his day, from the nature of love and friendship to the nature of political leadership. Significantly, he returns again and again to the relationship between language and thought, and thought and action. We will examine Shakespeare’s language use and plots in the context of the early modern commercial theater (its material conditions and literary trends) and the poetic and rhetorical traditions disseminated through Elizabethan grammar schools. Shakespeare’s plays and poems represent a so-called common heritage yet they are utterly “foreign to us all,” distant from us in “time, language, and thought.” My assignments are designed to help students (1) overcome historical and linguistic barriers to comprehension, and (2) come to terms with material that resists simplification and assimilation. I present historical difference as an intellectual challenge and ultimately as an opportunity to reimagine the norms of current culture that can otherwise appear natural or inevitable.

Section: 607 #1481
Instructor: V. Strain
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

In numerous works that mastered and innovated the literary forms trending in the late sixteenth century, Shakespeare probed the major cultural and political topics of his day, from the nature of love and friendship to the nature of political leadership. Significantly, he returns again and again to the relationship between language and thought, and thought and action. We will examine Shakespeare’s language use and plots in the context of the early modern commercial theater (its material conditions and literary trends) and the poetic and rhetorical traditions disseminated through Elizabethan grammar schools. Shakespeare’s plays and poems represent a so-called common heritage yet they are utterly “foreign to us all,” distant from us in “time, language, and thought.” My assignments are designed to help students (1) overcome historical and linguistic barriers to comprehension, and (2) come to terms with material that resists simplification and assimilation. I present historical difference as an intellectual challenge and ultimately as an opportunity to reimagine the norms of current culture that can otherwise appear natural or inevitable.


Studies in Renaissance (ENGL 328)

Section: 068 #2055
Instructor: C. Kendrick
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 – 3:35 PM LSC

The course will be a survey of the major lyric poets in the first half of the century, beginning with John Donne and Ben Jonson and winding up with Andrew Marvell, John Milton, and Katherine Philips.  We will especially discuss the way the major poets depend on and define themselves against one another; the evolution of lyric kinds; and the way the lyric records and responds to some of the main social and cultural changes under way.


Restoration and 18th Century Studies (ENGL 333)

Section: 059 #51572
Instructor: T. Kaminski
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM LSC

Men and Women; Manners and Morals:  This course will examine the ways that men and women are represented in the period from 1660 to about 1800. The age witnessed an amazing change in attitudes towards proper behavior. Following the Restoration of Charles II to the British throne in 1660, members of the court (and the king himself) were notorious for their libertinism, but they seemed far less willing to grant women of their own class the same sort of sexual freedom that they themselves indulged. As the decades passed, libertinism fell out of fashion, but male writers continued to examine (and criticize) women’s behavior. This course will examine both the world of the Restoration rake and the subsequent reaction. From the male perspective we will read plays by William Wycherley and William Congreve, poems by the Earl of Rochester, Jonathan Swift, and Alexander Pope, and moral essays by Joseph Addison and Samuel Johnson. But these will be countered by plays, poems, and essays by such important women writers as Aphra Behn, Mary Astell, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. The course requirements will include two papers, a midterm exam, and a final.


Studies in the Romantic Period (ENGL 338)

Section: 069 #5128
Instructor: J. Cragwall
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 -12:20 PM LSC

“To defend the Bible in this year 1798,” snarled William Blake, “would cost a man his life—the Beast & the Whore rule without controls.” Our course will attempt a deep history of this year 1798, when Blake thought the glory of the French Revolution had given way to Antichrist. As we’ll read, this single year saw Australia transformed into a continent-prison; England and France in the throes of an apocalyptic war; universal starvation forecast as the inevitable Principle of Population by the Reverend Malthus; Mary Wollstonecraft, mother of feminism, dead and remembered as whore by her own husband’s Memoirs; prophecies on the imminent End of Days seriously debated in Parliament; the “Rights of Man” ruined, its proponents jailed, silenced, and disappeared. Yet in the shadow of this year, the greatest English poets since John Milton began to speak. William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge produced the astounding and disturbing Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth also began his epic Prelude, the most important autobiography in the language, while Coleridge veered from opium fevers in “Kubla Khan” to vampire pornography in Christabel. Blake had pronounced a host of “Prophetic Books,” all spectacularly engraved by his own hand—and all mysteriously silenced by 1798.  But the year saw a secret renaissance of English prose, in Jane Austen’s first (though unpublished) novel, the gothic parody Northanger Abbey—and when the Victorian George Eliot meditated in Adam Bede on the time when an Old England became the New, she settled on the year 1798. This literary moment—of isolation, despair, and luminous hope—will be our subject.  Papers, exams, various atrocities; fulfills post-1797, pre-1799 requirement, which is not in fact a requirement; also fulfills the pre-1900, post-1700, which is.


Victorian Period Studies (ENGL 343)

Section: 070 #1783
Instructor: M. Clarke
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

The novel is both work of art and mirror and interpreter of culture.  Although novels explore “matters quite as important as history” in an "easy and comfortable" form, they are able to represent the interfaces of so many aspects of life that, according to Thackeray, they “are much truer than real histories; which . . . can have no moral effect upon the reader” (Thackeray, “On Some French Fashionable Novels,” 1839).  In addition to reading first for enjoyment, in this course we will discuss how to interpret the novels, will examine the biographical and historical contexts that inform them, and will devote some time to the theory of the novel.  Assignments will consist of a mid-term, term paper, and final examination, as well as an occasional quiz or reflection paper.  Texts:  William M. Thackeray, Vanity Fair, 1847; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, 1847; Charlotte Brontë, Villette, 1852; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations, 1860; George Eliot, Mill on the Floss, 1860; Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd, 1874.


Studies in Modernism (ENGL 344)

Section: 071 #5129
Instructor: J. Wexler
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

Definitions of modernism are hotly debated because the term has acquired so much prestige. Yet authors usually associated with the term are so distinctive that they do not suggest a common set of characteristics. We will read a selection of canonical texts from the first half of the twentieth century to test various definitions of modernism: poems by Hardy, Yeats, Owen, and Eliot as well as Heart of Darkness, The Rainbow, Dubliners, and Mrs. Dalloway.


Studies in Postmodernism (ENGL 350)

Section: 072 #5211
Instructor: P. Caughie
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

The focus of this course is on Western fiction and theory since World War II that can be discussed in terms of the powerful contemporary discourse of “postmodernism.”  Narratives thus classified share many textual strategies and theoretical assumptions, but may differ radically in their social and political implications.  The main point of the course, then, is to come to terms with the term "postmodernism" and its various uses.  We will investigate a complex of aesthetic, social-historical, political, and theoretical issues which inform postmodern literature and culture.  We will discuss literature in relation to other art forms--architecture, painting, photography, film--as well as in relation to a handful of theorists who have developed influential characterizations of postmodernism.

Course requirements include class leads on weekly readings, a midterm, a 10-page seminar paper, and participation in a two-day symposium on postmodernism (April 10-11th) with three visiting scholars whose work we’ll read. 


Contemporary Literature (ENGL 351)

Section: 073 #5130
Instructor: H. Mann
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 PM LSC

This course will examine the issues of colonization and decolonization as depicted in selected twentieth and twenty-first-century fiction from Africa, the West Indies, and South Asia. To familiarize students with the debates informing the field of Postcolonial Studies and to apprise them of the political and aesthetic challenges that postcolonial texts pose for both writers and readers, western and non-western, students will investigate the following concerns among others: (a) the definition of "postcoloniality"; (b) the composition by postcolonial writers of fictional histories of their lands that counter imperial and neocolonial "master narratives"; (c) the use of English as a literary language, and the creation of experimental linguistic and textual structures based upon indigenous traditions; (d) the effects of writing simultaneously for a local and western audience; (e) the portrayal of religion, race, ethnicity, gender, caste, class, migration/diaspora, and globalization; and (f) the role of postcolonial literatures in the western academy.

Please note that this section of the course meets the multicultural requirement of the English major.


Contemporary Critical Theory (ENGL 354)

Section: 074 #2426
Instructor: P. Jay
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

This course introduces students to a range of contemporary theories about literature, literary criticism, and cultural studies. We will explore recent innovations in how we think about texts, authorship, narration, writing, and reading, review a variety of approaches to critical analysis and interpretation, and consider the social, cultural, and political dimensions of critical theory and literary analysis. The course is a mix of lecture and discussion. Required texts for this course will include a range of introductory and advanced readings in critical and literary theory (including The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory), and a selection of poetry and fiction. Requirements include weekly quizzes, two 5-6 page critical essays, and a final longer paper or project drawing on some of the theories we study to analyze some aspect of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, a novel by Junot.


Literature: Writer’s Perspective (ENGL 357)

Section: 075 #1484
Instructor: D. Kaplan
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

Flannery O’Connor said that stories have a beginning, middle, and end—though not necessarily in that order.  This course will explore some of the “disordered”, unusual, disjunctive, eccentric ways that fiction writers have told their stories.  And not just chronological discontinuity (although that’s one way we’ll examine), but through other narrative means as well; e.g., a variety of voices for a single character, alternate versions of a single story, different literary genres within a single story, etc.  We will read fiction by writers such as Marguerite Duras, Paul Auster, Susan Sontag, D.M. Thomas, Michael Ondaatje, and Donald Barthelme, and will also see some relevant films.  Written work will partially consist of student-written fiction in representative eccentric modes; therefore, the prior taking of English 318, Introduction to Fiction Writing, is highly desirable and highly recommended.


Studies in Poetry (ENGL 362)

Section: 076 #5131
Instructor: D. Chinitz
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 – 2:15 PM LSC

We will focus on several distinctive voices in modern poetry, ranging from the traditional to the experimental, from the late nineteenth century to nearly the present, and from writers who seem firmly canonical to some whose historical place is less certain. The reading list will depend in part on the availability of texts but tentatively includes Elizabeth Bishop, Emily Dickinson, A. E. Housman, Philip Larkin, Sharon Olds, and John Crowe Ransom. 


American Literature: 1865 - 1914 (ENGL 376)

Section: 077 #5132
Instructor: J. Kerkering
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 – 10:10 AM LSC

This course examines the work of selected American writers from the Civil War to World War I, paying particular attention to theories of Realism, to associated Regional forms, to literary Naturalism, and to the contribution of literary works to emerging notions of "the modern." Students will complete weekly one-page responses, two papers of medium length (5-6 pages), a mid-term exam, and a longer final paper (8-10 pages). Authors may include Howells, Twain, Harper, Davis, Chopin, Hopkins, James, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, Chesnutt, and Gilman.


Studies in American Culture Post-1900 (ENGL 382C)

Section: 077 #5505
Instructor: B. Ahad
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 – 1:25 PM LSC

The ideal of the “self-made man” has functioned as an American trope since the early 19th century, and continues to resonate in the 21st century. American society has been, since its inception, defined around principles of equality, freedom and opportunity. This promise of “success” is, theoretically, made available to anyone who exhibits the traits of honesty, earnestness, patience, and a good work ethic. This course will explore the contours of the very American concepts of self-invention, self-improvement and self-help. Specifically, we will examine a range of texts (literary and visual) that embody the democratic promise of social mobility, as well as those that destabilize the American ideal of self-cultivation through racial and/or class passing, social climbing and other acts of social subversion. We will also examine the phenomenon of “self-help,” which has historically played a significant role in the American obsession with being “better” and achieving “more.” Given the advanced nature of this seminar, there will be a strong emphasis on individual participation and group interaction. There will also be a midterm, a final, and a series of in-class writing assignments.

This course fulfills both the post-1900 and multicultural literature requirement.


Advanced Seminar: (ENGL 390)

Section: 16W #2943
Instructor: J. Biester
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 – 11:15 AM LSC

This course will examine magic and the representation of magic in the literature and culture of the early modern period, or Renaissance, when ideas about magic overlapped with ideas about nature and science, religion, social and political hierarchy, gender, and crime.  To explore how magic intersected with these various spheres of the culture, and how writers envisioned their art in relation to magic, we will read texts in a variety of genres, including plays (by Shakespeare and others), poems, ballads, witchcraft pamphlets, and selections from treatises on magical practices.  Requirements will include both graded and ungraded writing assignments, presentations in class, and a final exam (probably a take-home exam).

Section: 17W #3424
Instructor: J. Bouson
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 – 11:15 AM LSC

English 390—Advanced Seminar will focus on the depiction of shame in selected works by 20th- and  21st-century authors.  Often referred to by affect theorists as the “master emotion,” shame is “a multidimensional, multilayered experience,” observes Gershen Kaufman.  “While first of all an individual phenomenon experienced in some form and to some degree by every person, shame is equally a family phenomenon and a cultural phenomenon.  It is reproduced within families, and each culture has its own distinct sources as well as targets of shame.”  This course will provide students with a brief introduction to and overview of shame theory, including psychological accounts of shame and its related feeling states (such as embarrassment, humiliation, and lowered self-esteem) and the classic defenses against shame (such as contempt or arrogance or shamelessness).  The authors we will read include Kafka, Bellow, Morrison, Moore,  Mairs, and Sarton. There will be oral presentations, quizzes, papers, and exams.

Section: 18W #4062
Instructor: E. Wheatley
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC

This course will trace the history of English drama from its Latin roots through the Middle Ages and into the sixteenth century. Readings will include examples of liturgical drama, cycle drama, saints' plays, morality plays, and humanist drama, as well as relevant literary criticism. The course will also examine each type of drama in light of the conventions and practices that governed its original production. The majority of readings will be in the original Middle English. Requirements will include active class participation, weekly responses, one short essay, one oral report and a related research paper, and a final essay.


Advanced Creative Nonfiction (ENGL 392)

Section: 08W #5134
Instructor: N. K. Johnstone
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

This is a workshop in writing creative nonfiction, furthering work done in English 319, Writing Creative Nonfiction.  Students will study and write in different genres (e.g., memoir, travel writing, personal essay, literary journalism, the lyric essay). 

Outcome: By reading published models, students will deepen their learning of traditional and innovative creative nonfiction methods. Students will then write creative nonfiction pieces and participate in workshops of their classmates' writing.


Teaching English to Adults (ENGL 393)

Section: 01E #1522
Instructor: J. Heckman
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 5:30 PM – 10:00 PM LSC

One student who was enrolled in one of our Literacy Center courses said, “I can’t say I’ve been in a nicer environment on Loyola’s campus.  Everyone is welcoming and treats everyone else with respect. And the time flies by because I love what I’m doing.”  Students who have taken this course have found it to be a challenging and exciting experience, even life changing as they help neighborhood adults improve their skills.

English 393 offers an excellent opportunity for service learning and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center, located in Loyola Hall, 1110 W. Loyola Avenue, across the street from Mertz.

No previous tutoring experience is necessary.  When taken for 3 credit hours, this course satisfies the Core Engaged Learning-Service Learning Internship requirement.  The course is open to second-semester freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, although incoming freshmen are always welcome to tutor as volunteers and take the course at a later date.

Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills.  Other learners are international visitors, or immigrants or refugees whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps functionally illiterate, and who may know some English or no English. 

The Center is open M-Th evenings during the fall and spring semesters from 7-9:30 pm.  1 credit hour students tutor one evening per week; 2 and 3 credit hour students tutor two evenings a week. 

If students have never tutored at the Center, they must attend one evening of orientation as well as bi-weekly class meetings (5 meetings per semester for 1-2 credit hour students, 6 class meetings per semester for 3 credit hour/Core students).  Students keep a weekly journal of their experiences; examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy, language, and adult education; submit ten of their journals and four papers throughout the semester; prepare a final paper or project; and, for 3 credit hour students, read and report on one additional text of their choice related to the work of the Center, to adult literacy, to the culture of their learners, or to any topic suggested by their tutoring experience. 

More information can be found at www.luc.edu/literacy.  Follow the links to "tutoring" and then "course credit tutoring" for a complete description. 

Section: 02E #1523
Instructor: J. Heckman
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MTWR 5:30 PM – 10:00 PM LSC

(See above.)


Internship (ENGL 394)

Section: 79E #1525
Instructor: J. Cragwall

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations.  Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program.  Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples.  Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins.  Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job.


Honors Tutorial: (ENGL 395)

Section: 19W #2651
Instructor: J. Glover
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 – 12:45 PM LSC

The American Revolution was also a literary revolution. Friends and foes of independence used literature as a vehicle for debating ideas of liberty and nationhood. This course will consider American literature during the period of the revolution. Our readings will span numerous genres, including political tracts, novels and poetry. We will consider a range of authors, such as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, William Apess, Phillis Wheatley, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Along the way, we will explore the many diverse literary responses to revolutionary ideas, with a special emphasis on how early national ideas of liberty applied to women, slaves, and Native Americans and other people excluded from the newly emergent nation.


Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry (ENGL 397)

Section: 20W #1784
Instructor: A. Baker
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 – 5:15 PM LSC

In this advanced poetry workshop, we will seek to deepen our engagement with poetry as an art form—both as readers and writers. Through reading, writing, and workshopping, we will grow more familiar with the anatomy and texture of poetry: image, word, voice, syntactical configurations, and rhetorical devices— stanza, line, punctuation, and page. Your work will be given a great deal of individual attention in our workshops, and you will be offered the opportunity to work very closely with the instructor as you write and revise your final project for the course—a portfolio of your best work.


Advanced Writing: Fiction (ENGL 398)

Section: 21W #1527
Instructor: D. Kaplan
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 PM – 5:00 PM LSC

A fiction writing workshop for those who have already taken English 318 (a prerequisite), which builds upon concepts of fictional art and craft studied there.  Students will write original stories which will be discussed and critiqued by the instructor and by one's fellow writers in a supportive workshop environment.  Students will also read and discuss the craft of master fiction writers, such as Steven Milhauser, Haruki Murakami, Joy Williams, Richard Ford, and others.  Class participation is emphasized.


Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399)

Section: 080 #1528
Instructor: J. Cragwall

Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.


GRADUATE-LEVEL COURSES

Teaching College Composition (ENGL 402)

Section: 800 #1537
Instructor: M. Bradshaw
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

English 402 examines the practices of teaching college composition and the theories that support those practices. We begin by looking at how writing programs are positioned within English departments and within universities and then move to an exploration of major pedagogical movements in the discipline. As we explore different pedagogical approaches to teaching composition, students will work to develop their own teaching philosophies.  Assignments include writing weekly response papers, creating sample assignments, lesson plans, and a syllabus, and crafting a formal teaching statement. ENGL 402 is mandatory for Ph.D. students who will be teaching UCWR 110, but it is also a good class for MA students who are interested in teaching college composition at junior and community colleges.


Textual Criticism (ENGL 413)

Section: 801 #4063
Instructor: P. Eggert
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

This course provides an introduction to some of the forms and specialized skills of literary scholarship: the use of literary archives, aspects of physical bibliography and the production of books, and methodologies of scholarly editing, both print and digital, together with the theories that lie behind them. The course then investigates textual criticism (the study of versions) for its relevance to the interpretation of literature. Here, the history of the book and the role of readerships come into play as concepts of authorship, authority, authenticity, text, and the work are explored.


Postmodernism (ENGL 428)

Section: 802 #5136
Instructor: P. Caughie
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 4:15 – 5:30 PM LSC

The focus of this course is on western fiction and theory since World War II that can be discussed in terms of this powerful contemporary discourse. The main point of the course is to come to terms with the term "postmodernism" and its various uses:  as a literary period, as an aesthetic style, as an historical moment, as a cultural problematic, and as a theoretical imperative. Taking it as a given that postmodernism is an object of contestation for various strains of theory (e.g., Marxist, feminist, poststructuralist), we will trace out some of those portrayals in the work of a handful of theorists and writers who have developed influential characterizations of postmodernism. We will investigate a complex of aesthetic, social-historical, political, and theoretical issues which inform postmodern literature and culture, and, in doing so, we will take up that vexed issue of the relation between postmodernism and modernism as well as feminism.  We will discuss postmodernism in relation to other art forms--architecture, painting, photography, film--as well. Our goal, in short, will be to map out the discursive domain of the postmodern era, keeping in mind that "postmodern" does not mean "contemporary."  Course requirements will include participation in a two-day symposium on postmodernism (April 10-11th) with three visiting scholars whose work we will read: Brian McHale, Urmila Seshagiri, and Jeffrey Nealon.  Readings will average a novel and several essays each week. Requirements include a report, a midterm, and a 15-20 page seminar paper.


Shakespeare (ENGL 455)

Section: 803 #5137
Instructor: J. Knapp
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 4:15 – 5:30 PM LSC

The past two decades of Shakespeare scholarship have witnessed an increasing emphasis on material culture and the materiality of the early modern stage.  Studies of stage properties, theatrical space, and the material conditions of playing in early modern London have shaped the ways in which we view the interactions of Shakespeare’s characters with their material surroundings.  Likewise the material conditions of the early modern print trade have yielded insights into the relationship that the playwright had with the publication and circulation of his works in both print and manuscript.  This new materially focused scholarship has largely displaced earlier scholarship that had concentrated on Shakespeare’s aesthetics, his place in the history of ideas and the nature of his linguistic innovation.  Yet, the relationship between material existence and the immaterial world of ideas is a consistent focus of the plays and poetry.  This course will examine how a focus on Shakespeare’s interest in the immaterial—the conceptual, spiritual, non-existent—complicates materially inflected readings of his poetry and plays.   


Topics in Victorian Literature: Reception Then and Now (ENGL 475)

Section: 804 #5138
Instructor: F. Fennell
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 – 9:30 PM LSC

The focus of this course will be on reception theory as it relates to four prominent—and eminent?—Victorians, the prose writer John Ruskin and the poets Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, and Gerard Manley Hopkins.  But the emphasis will be on two kinds of reception:  how the writer was received in his or her own Victorian time, and how the writer is being received now, in our time.  In so doing we will intersect other interests, such as changing understandings of aesthetic value and changing understandings of class—this last following upon the movement away from the Marxist bête noir, the bourgeoisie, to the new literary ruling class, the scholar (i.e. you and me), and the consequences for general readers.  Besides extensive readings in the four principal authors and the manifold responses to them, the course will include side glances into once-popular writers whose reputation has not survived the last 150 years intact, i.e. poets like Alexander Smith, Sydney Dobell, and “Festus” Bailey or prose writers like Samuel Smiles.  Requirements will include a short and a somewhat longer class presentation, a short paper and a longer research paper, and a brief summative essay.


Modern Novel (ENGL 483)

Section: 805 #5139
Instructor: M. Bosco
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 10:30 - 11:45 AM LSC

Catholic Literary Modernism

This course looks at the Modern novel through the lens of Catholic literary aesthetics, what is commonly called the Catholic literary tradition.  The course engages an interdisciplinary study of literature and theological discourse by asking how a religious imagination produces culture.  We will be looking at Catholicism as an “ideological discourse,” for the traces of philosophy, aesthetics, and theology that shape, interface, or perhaps transgress the more prominent ideologies embedded in both the Anglo-American canon of modernist literature and its theoretical assumptions.   We will delve into a Catholic literary genealogy by discussing such authors as Francois Mauriac, Georges Bernanos, Graham Greene, Muriel Spark, Flannery O’Connor, Walker Percy, Ron Hansen, and other artists of film and poetry.