Loyola University Chicago

Department of English

Fall 2016 Courses

100-Level Classes

200-Level Classes

300-Level Classes

Graduate Classes

Interpreting Literature (UCLR 100) 

Section: 01L #3834
Instructor:  Jergenson, C.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 a.m. – 9:05 a.m., LSC 

This course introduces students to the study of literature. The texts we will read vary greatly in terms of genre, form, and historical context, but they are united by certain common concerns. Foremost among these concerns is the relationship between humans and the natural world. Through our readings of texts by Marianne Moore, Edward Albee, Chang-rae Lee, Octavia Butler, and others, we will consider the ways in which literary texts critique modern society’s impact on the environment, complicate conventional distinctions between human and animal, and seek to represent nature through literary forms. 

Our readings of these texts will provide us with opportunities to learn, discuss, and apply some of the core terms and methods associated with literary analysis. Developing a critical awareness of our reading practices will help us to understand the ways in which we derive meaning from literary texts, but these investigations will also lead us to engage with the fundamental questions behind this course: What is literature? Why do we read it? How should we determine what a text means? Assignments will include quizzes, essays, and exams. 

Section: 02L #3835
Instructor:  Kucsera, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:15 a.m. – 9:05 a.m., LSC 

As global citizens of the 21st century, we are confronted with the reality of violence that comes from uncompromising religious intolerance. At home, not only domestic politics but even our personal relationships are affected by religious identity. An ability to think productively about religious difference is necessary if we are to be responsible members of society. Could historical literature help us grapple with the contemporary challenges of religious pluralism? How are literary works related to culture, and how do they reflect—and reflect on—questions of value and the diversity of human experience? What is the difference between reading a literary work in its historical context and in our own time? 

Drawing primarily on English texts from the 16th through the 18th centuries, this foundational class in literature will not only give you the tools necessary to read closely, analyze carefully, and master key literary and critical terms, it will explore how writers of an earlier era attempted to navigate the complex paths of religious tolerance and intolerance, the tempting ideal of cultural unity, and the inevitability of diversity and contradiction. The course will adopt the lens of early modern Christian approaches to interfaith relationships, but it will include the voices of Islamic and Jewish writers of the period in order to account for a diversity of perspectives. Finally, while the course will take drama as its centerpiece, it will also examine poems, ballads, and end with the study of a novel. 

Section: 03L #3836
Instructor: Bradshaw, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., LSC  

In this section of Loyola’s foundational course in literary studies we will focus on literature written in and about Chicago, from the 19th century to the present. Texts will include Simon Pokagon, The Red Man’s Rebuke, Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun, David Mamet, Glengarry Glen Ross, poems and short stories by Chicago authors such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Li-Young Lee, Carl Sandburg, Stuart Dybek, and Sandra Cisneros. 

This course will require students to read closely and analyze carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama, master key literary and critical terms, and explore a variety of core critical approaches to conceptual questions about literature and its study. What is literature? Why does it matter? How has it been conceived in different times and places? Where does meaning come from in literature? What is literary interpretation and what role does it have in the production of literary meaning? How are literary works related to culture and society and how do they reflect—and reflect on—questions of value and the diversity of human experience? 

Section: 04L #3837
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., LSC 

 

Section: 05L #3838
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 am. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

 

Section: 06L #3839
Instructor: Bayley, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Willa Cather, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four-page papers, and classroom participation. 

Section: 07L #3840
Instructor: Quirk, K.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

We have all read and interpreted literature before. For this course, however, we will strive to do so in a more complex, informed, and autonomous ways. We will work toward this goal by reading a lot of poetry, drama, and fiction, and then analyzing it regularly and in detail. Another of our goals will be to develop a better critical vocabulary and analytical approach to these types of literature. Writing assignments (both formal and informal) will emphasize individual engagement and literary analysis of the works we read but will also seek to improve general writing skills. There will be regular “low-stakes” writing exercises as well as some “creative” writing exercises intended to help us understand literature better by practicing literary writing. More broadly, however, I hope we will all learn to approach literature in a more attentive, engaged, and ultimately pleasurable manner. Ideally, we will not only learn about literature and literary techniques but will also try to relish the pleasure of literary reading. Readings will likely include a broad sampling of poets and poetry, an ancient Greek drama or two, a modern drama, short stories that are both realistic and experimental in form, and one short novel.  

Section: 08L #3841
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., LSC 

Section: 09L #3842
Instructor:  Sorenson, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., LSC 

Over the course of the semester, we will be exploring the three principal literary genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. We will emphasize the historical contexts in which these stories, poems, and plays were written, and we will examine a variety of critical postures with which to interpret these texts. Students will also be asked to establish their own claims by way of shorter responses and longer formal essays. As we read, we will always ask why literature matters: Why do we choose to read? What can stories or lyrics teach us? How does literature participate in the building of our cultural and individual points of view? Finally, the course’s theme is “Horror in the Family.” We will explore a variety of families and family-like relationships and the ways in which these structures can foster or repel the horrible, with particular emphasis on the monstrous and the uncanny. 

Section: 10L #3843
Instructor: Wheatley, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., LSC 

This course requires students to read and interpret Gothic literature and its predecessors in three genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will learn close reading skills and literary terminology necessary for analyzing literature. The course will include works by such writers as Shakespeare, Keats, Wilde, Henry James, and Toni Morrison. Active class participation is required and will be an important part of the final grade. Other methods of assessment will include quizzes, papers, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. 

Section: 11L #3844
Instructor: Bayley, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 p.m. – 01:25 p.m., LSC 

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Willa Cather, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four-page papers, and classroom participation. 

Section: 12L #3845
Instructor: Boyle, T.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 p.m. – 1:25 p.m., LSC 

Reading can be fun. Close reading can make the experience even more enjoyable. In this introductory course we will explore how writers tease the reader with multilayered texts, rich in imagery, clever word choices, and interesting insights into human behavior. During this course we will cover works of poetry, prose and drama from at least two different time periods; pre-modern and modern. Texts will include works from Ireland, England and the U.S.A.

Section: 13L #3846
Instructor: Cornelius, I.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 p.m. – 1:25 p.m., LSC 

This course is an introduction to literature and literary studies. We read poetry, drama, and prose fiction from a diverse range of social and historical contexts, and we develop skills and a conceptual tool-kit for responding to the literature we read. Major topics include analysis of literary language; explorations of literary meaning; and development of oral and written arguments about literature. Students will consider how they allocate attention in literary reading (what do we focus on, and what do we look for, when we read literature?); and they will also develop a means for assessing interpretations of literature (what may we expect an interpretation to do?). We will explore the anatomy of literary works, viewed as discrete verbal artifacts; and we will also explore how those discrete verbal artifacts relate to the universe of entities beyond their boundaries. How should we characterize relations  between literary works, the authors who write them, the readers  and audiences (including ourselves) who choose to pay attention to them, and the cultural worlds in which all of this takes place? 

Readings will include Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale,” William Shakespeare’s Othello, short fiction by Herman Melville, James Joyce, and Flannery O’Connor, and poems by Petrarch, Shakespeare, John Keats, and Emily Dickinson, among other pieces. This literature will enable us to explore the nature of doubt, certainty, and belief, the experiences of discovering, wanting, or opposing something, and dialectics of self and community. 

Students will write two essays, contribute to an on-line forum, and take a mid-term and final exam. 

Section: 14L #3847
Instructor: Cooperrider, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 p.m. – 1:25 p.m., LSC 

Historical Representations

This foundational course in literary studies will focus on the reading and analysis of a variety of prose, poetry,

and drama through an investigation of the relationship between literature and historical narratives. The history that we learn in school or through mass culture is developed to tell a particular story with specific motives, and together we will read literary works that comment upon or re-tell that history with the goal of opening up new perspectives. Students will master key literary and critical terms and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature, including why we study literature in the first place. Why is the study of literature so important in the modern world? How do literary works take on new shapes and meanings depending on format, audience, and time period? What can an analysis of literary narratives teach us about the way history is constructed? Through a variety of historical literary works, students will interrogate and discover the field of literary study with the goal of realizing the continued importance of literature in modern life. 

Section: 15L #3848
Instructor: Bayley, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

This is a foundational course that introduces key literary and critical terms and explores a variety of critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. In particular, we will be looking at the concepts of dying, death and grieving and discuss how these concepts are depicted in a number of different poems, plays and short stories. These topics are often difficult topics to discuss and yet, they are inevitable realities in each of our lives. Thus, we will use texts, by a number of different American authors, such as Willa Cather, Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich and more, to explore what dying, death and grieving might consist of, not only personally but also politically, and further, within the medical field itself. The method of assessment will include quizzes, three, four-page papers, and classroom participation. 

Section: 16L #3849
Instructor: Boyle, T.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

Reading can be fun. Close reading can make the experience even more enjoyable. In this introductory course we will explore how writers tease the reader with multilayered texts, rich in imagery, clever word choices, and interesting insights into human behavior. During this course we will cover works of poetry, prose and drama from at least two different time periods; pre-modern and modern. Texts will include works from Ireland, England and the U.S.A. 

Section: 17L #3850 
Instructor: Goldstein, L.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

In this course, we will read, discuss and write about many texts in a variety of literary genres. You will be introduced to multiple ways of approaching and interpreting texts ranging from ancient authors to contemporary ones, including traditional and experimental forms in the three major genres and a few in between. There are strong themes of race and gender in the course, as well as social structure and power. Materials include: Antigone, Othello and Venus (Plays), Kindred and Madame Bovary (Novels), and a host of poetry. Writing assignments will include one short response, a midterm essay, and a final exam. 

Section: 18L #3851
Instructor:  Stogner, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

Women and the Home

This foundational  course  in literary studies  will  require students to  read  closely  and  analyze  carefully a representative variety of prose, poetry, and drama; master key literary and critical terms; and explore a variety of core critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of literature. This course will also explore important conceptual questions about literature and its study in order to help students develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner. 

The theme of this course is women and the domestic sphere. Through an examination of literary texts from a wide range of genres and periods, we will explore the varied and rich ways in which authors have represented women’s relationships with the home. Texts covered will include Louisa May Alcott’s Behind a Mask, Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and a selection of poems, essays, speeches, short stories, and television episodes. Course requirements include (1) engaged reading of all assigned texts, informal written responses, reading quizzes, and class participation; (2) two formal literary analysis papers; and, (3) midterm and final exams.

Section: 19L #3852
Instructor: Quirk, K.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m., LSC 

This course offers practice and instruction in the techniques and analysis of poetry through reading, writing, discussing, and revising poems. We will give particular attention to the  unique  challenges  and opportunities facing beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry, to find and then develop our own voices in relation to not only our own impulses but to "the tradition" and the aesthetically diverse and fascinating world of contemporary poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the Instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term. 

Section: 20L #3853
Instructor:  TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m., LSC 

 

Section: 21L #3854
Instructor:  Macey, D. R.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m., LSC

The Uncanny, the Monstrous, and the Marvelous

This foundational course in literary studies will focus on the theme of monstrosity and the fantastic as portrayed in fiction, poetry, drama, and a little nonfiction. What happens on the page when the marvelous intrudes on the everyday, and what effects does it have on readers? The course will emphasize close reading, including a careful attention to form. Assignments will include forum posts, a research essay, a midterm, and weekly quizzes. 

Section: 22L #3855
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m., LSC

 

Section: 23L #3810
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m., LSC

 

Section: 24L #4185
Instructor: Randolph, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC

This is a core course that will teach the fundamentals about critical thinking, reading, and writing. This year in UCLR we will be reading poetry, prose, and plays from the Norton Anthology. In addition, we will read some short stories from contemporary authors along with classics, such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. We will discuss the six essential elements of fiction: Plot, Narration and Point of View, Character, Setting, Symbolism, and Themes. Some of the authors we will read include: Sherman Alexie, William Shakespeare, William Faulkner, Salmon Rushdie, and many others. When you leave this class you will have mastered key literary terms and be equipped with multiple critical lenses. 

Section: 25L #4186
Instructor:  Weller, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

 

Section: 26L #4817
Instructor: Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

Why should we care about literature?

We’ll start historically: who before us has cared about literature, and why? We’ll study the pressure texts put on their historical moment, and how they’re shaped by it in surprising ways: for example, our discussion of Shakespeare will start with the formation of “Shakespeare” as a figure, often at odds with the “evidence” of the poems, of canonical standards throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a program that affected even the spelling of his poems. We’ll read some authors who were white, male, and rich (and some who weren’t): how has literature been used to promote a series of questions and assumptions that they may have shared (sometimes called “the canon”), and how has it, even in these same authors, blown apart all the stereotypes and orthodoxies we’d expect to find? We’ll watch the invention not only of English (and then British) culture, but of the English language itself, its twists and triumphs, detours and degenerations—and most importantly, we’ll watch as language, especially literary language, is fashioned into the greatest vehicle of social and aesthetic contest. 

Section: 27L #4189
Instructor:  Kendrick, C.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

This foundational course is intended to improve students’ ability to understand and appreciate poetry, drama, and fictional prose. Readings will mostly be of works in these three basic kinds of literature, and will, with a few exceptions, mostly be by recent (which, for me, means late nineteenth- and twentieth-century) American authors. They will likely include, by way of poetry, poems by these poets: Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Lowell, Elisabeth Bishop, Margaret Atwood, Yusuf Komunyakaa, and Derek Walcott; by way of prose fiction, Melville’s “Bartleby the Scrivener”, Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr Ripley, Octavia Butler’s Kindred, and Sembene Ousmane’s Xala!; and, by way of plays, John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, and Sarah Rule’s Dead Man’s Cell Phone. There will be some pop quizzes; a midterm and final exam; one very short paper; and two short papers.

Section: 28L #4190
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

 

Section: 29L #4932
Instructor: Chinitz, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

This course will develop students’ ability to analyze literature at the college level. The texts we discuss will vary across genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) and historical time periods. Authors likely to appear on the syllabus include Jane Austen, LeRoi Jones, James Joyce, Flannery O’Connor, Bernard Shaw, and Tennessee Williams, among others. The close-reading skills we practice will cultivate students’ critical thinking, understanding of literary texts, and appreciation of the craft of writing. 

Section: 30L #4933
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

 

Section: 31L #4188
Instructor:  Strain, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

This course will introduce students to multiple periods and genres of literature through texts that represent war. We will begin by examining canonical works, including a classical epic and a Shakespeare history play. After examining the historical conventions of war literature, we will look at examples of twentieth century experimental texts that grapple with the friction between literary tradition and the realities of modern warfare, and between survivors and successive generations. While this course incorporates poetry, drama, short stories, a novel, and a graphic novel, we will be concentrating on the critical questions related to narrative. How are stories constructed and for what kinds of effects? How do stories interrelate, influence, and allude to one another in order to create traditions and shared perceptions? How do narratives preserve or challenge personal and national identities and histories? How does literature interact with value systems and political realities? 

Section: 32L #5472
Instructor: Bost, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

This foundational course in literary studies will require students to read closely and to analyze carefully a variety of literary genres, including poetry, short story, drama, novel, and creative nonfiction. As we explore important conceptual questions about the nature and function of literature, our readings will focus on the theme of literature and social justice. Following our university’s mission to expand knowledge in the service of humanity and social justice, we will focus on how literary texts from different time periods and different cultures have addressed problems in their social, political, and environmental contexts. How do these texts reflect – and reflect on – questions of justice and the diversity of human experience? How do they critique their contexts or encourage social change?  How have these texts differently conceived the relationships among author, textual form, literary content, and readers? Where does meaning come from in literature, and what is our ethical role as readers of literature? How do we read texts from other historical contexts in light of our own contemporary perspectives? Exploring these questions will help students to develop the skills of analysis and interpretation needed to approach literature in a sophisticated manner as well as engaging students with larger questions of social justice. 

The authors we will study include Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, Rafael Campo, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Lucy Corin, Jane Addams, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Lorraine Hansberry, Cherríe Moraga, Chinua Achebe, and Ana Castillo. Assignments will include regular written responses to the readings, in-class exercises, and two exams. 

This course satisfies the first tier of Loyola University’s core Knowledge Area requirement in “Literary Knowledge.” 

Section: 33L #5473
Instructor: Glover, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

This course is a survey of American literature from the colonial period through the Civil War. It begins with early narratives of discovery and settlement and concludes with the fiction and poetry of the United States. We will consider a wide range of American writings, from the journals of Pilgrim settlers to the autobiographies of freed slaves. Our texts will also represent numerous genres, including lyric poetry, novels, and drama.

Business Writing (ENGL 210)  

Section: 20W #2133
Instructor:  Janangelo, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., WTC 

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group presentation. 

Our course is writing intensive. We will use a process approach to writing, emphasizing problem-solving, prewriting strategies, and editing and revision skills. Our class is a workshop. As such, much of our time will be devoted to small group discussions and exercises. You will plan and share some of your writing with your peers and with me in draft conferences. That gives you a chance to exchange ideas, get assistance, participate in peer- editing, and receive feedback on your work. We will discuss our readings and projects in class. According to school policy, a student’s lack of appropriate course prerequisites constitutes grounds for being withdrawn from the class at any time. Because class conversations are integral to our work, regular attendance is essential. If you are absent, please contact someone from class to find out what you missed. 

ENGL 210-20W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 60W #3062
Instructor:  Meinhardt, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., WTC
 

Business Writing is a seminar designed to build and improve effective communication practices for use in the business community. The ideas of “personal professionalism” and “priority of purposes” guide an exploration of business writing genres ranging from correspondence to memos, and from employment documents to executive summaries. Collaboration, peer interaction, and individual economy direct the creation of a series of writing projects that use revision and research as a necessary step in the writing process. 

ENGL 210-60W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 61W #3833
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., WTC
 

ENGL 210-61W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 62W #5509
Instructor:  Janangelo, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., WTC 

Our course covers the rhetorical principles of effective writing, focusing on particular types of discourse practiced in business and professional settings. You will gain experience reading and writing texts pertinent to business communication including: memos, proposals, letters, and resumes. There will be individual and collaborative projects; you will also give a group presentation. 

Our course is writing intensive. We will use a process approach to writing, emphasizing problem-solving, prewriting strategies, and editing and revision skills. Our class is a workshop. As such, much of our time will be devoted to small group discussions and exercises. You will plan and share some of your writing with your peers and with me in draft conferences. That gives you a chance to exchange ideas, get assistance, participate in peer- editing, and receive feedback on your work. We will discuss our readings and projects in class. According to school policy, a student’s lack of appropriate course prerequisites constitutes grounds for being withdrawn from the class at any time. Because class conversations are integral to our work, regular attendance is essential. If you are absent, please contact someone from class to find out what you missed. 

ENGL 210-62W is a writing intensive class.  

Advanced Writing: Legal (ENGL 211) 

Section: 63W #4416
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m., WTC
 

ENGL 211-62W is a writing intensive class.  

Writing Center Tutor Practicum (ENGL 220)

Section: 1WE #2642
Instructor: Kessel, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

English 220 is a seminar designed to prepare students to serve as tutors in the Loyola University Chicago Writing Center. This course is open to students from all majors who have a passion for clear written communication. We will explore the theory and practice of peer tutoring through reading and discussion of research as well as through practical experience. In this course you will learn how to help others become better writers while improving your own writing and critical thinking skills. You will become part of a vibrant community of fellow peer tutors and gain experience that will benefit you in a variety of careers. The service-learning component consists of approximately 20-25 hours of observation and tutoring in the Writing Center. The writing intensive component includes journal writing, three response papers, and a group research paper. 

ENGL 220-1WE is a writing intensive class. 

Introduction to Poetry (ENGL 271)

Section: 01W #4036
Instructor: Biester, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

This class will provide an introduction to the understanding and analysis of poetry through the study of a wide range of poems in English. We will consider various motives for writing and reading poetry, and various methods of reading it. Because this course is writing intensive, there will be frequent brief writing assignments, both in and out of class. Requirements will include participation in class discussions, several papers, a midterm, and a final. 

ENGL 271-01W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 02W #4443
Instructor:  Jacobs, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m., LSC 

This course is not intended to turn people into poetry scholars.  I hope it will help them find the freedom to be poetry readers.  It is designed to help people discover ways to enter a poem directly.  How to have fun with poems, how to get at the kinds of pleasures they offer, how to use poetry to look at one's own life.  How to really read.

I require you to have your own copy of a major collection with poems from many periods, the NORTON ANTHOLOGY (the full edition, not the Shorter Edition).  But we will stress modern writers.  We will supplement the anthology with a short collection, also required, by a single author.  Three main papers will be required, plus a final exam.  I may make extended comments, but I won’t lecture.  I also require class participation—and you can’t participate if you're absent. You must risk entering discussion actively.

ENGL 271-02W is a writing intensive class.

Exploring Drama (ENGL 272)

Section: 057 #4444
Instructor:  Foster, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

In this course we will read and discuss a variety of plays by dramatists from the Greeks to the present: Euripides, Shakespeare, Molière, Ibsen, Shaw, Glaspell, Brecht, Williams, Beckett, Churchill, and Parks. Topics will include the relationship between text and performance, dramatic genres (tragedy, comedy, and tragicomedy), dramatic conventions or forms (realism, expressionism, epic theatre, and theatre of the absurd), topics such as love and war, and issues of race, class, and gender. The class will include discussion, videos, and in-class performances. We will attend a performance of Shaw’s Pygmalion at Remy Bumppo. Requirements: three essays (4-5 pages); class participation; in-class performance with a one-page report; midterm and final exams. 

Exploring Fiction (ENGL 273) 

Section: 058 #4446
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 9:20 a.m. – 10:10 a.m., LSC 

Section: 059 #4445
Instructor: Dyson, K.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

The Ethics of Storytelling

To attend to the ethics of storytelling, Adam Zachary Newton argues, is to address the “reciprocal claims binding teller, listener, witness, and reader.” In this course, we’ll explore how these claims shape our reading and inform how we navigate the worlds inside and outside the text. Through reading, listening to, watching, and creating stories, we’ll compare and explore different modes of storytelling (including short and long fiction, nonfiction, radio, film, and television). We’ll ask questions about voice and agency and examine genre, form, character, and focalization. Over the course of the semester, we’ll investigate the social, cultural, political, and ethical consequences of storytelling and how we imagine ourselves and others. In analyzing these narratives, we’ll reflect on how our experiences shape and are shaped by the stories we tell and how we tell them. 

Texts for this course will include short fiction by Virginia Woolf and David Foster Wallace, long(er) fiction by Teju Cole, Helen Oyeyemi, and Nathanael West, Nightcrawler, Ex Machina and other film and television, as well as radio narratives including Serial, Radiolab, and other podcasts. Assignments will include informal blog posts, two short papers, a group presentation, and a final project. 

Section: 060 #4447
Instructor: Christie, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 2:45 p.m. – 3:35 p.m., LSC 

Remediating Narrative:

Twitter, Netflix, iTunes. Vimeo, Soundcloud, Tumblr. The way we access and consume both media and narratives

has changed radically over the past decade and a half. With this transformation comes a shift in how narratives are formed and disseminated—novels begin to resemble websites; entire seasons of television are released in a single day; Vimeo, YouTube, and iTunes become essential spaces for long form journalism and serialized narratives. These shifts prompt some questions: how exactly do these narratives differ (in form and content) from those 20, 30, or 40 years ago? How has technology, like the Internet or eReaders, changed the novel or how we read? How have televisual narratives adapted to streaming providers like Netflix or Amazon? Following Fredrich Kittler’s claim that “media determine our situation,” this class will examine two (among other) interwoven questions: How has narrative, especially the novel and television, adapted and responded to contemporary technologies, and how has our experience and consumption of these narratives changed as a result? Texts may include novels by Mark Z. Danielewski and Gary Shteyngart, work by Claudia Rankine, various films and television, podcasts including Welcome to Nightvale, and an app or two. Possible assignments include short blog posts, 2 papers, and a final project. 

Section: 061 #4448
Instructor:  Kerkering, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

This course examines works by important American novelists from the late nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries. Class discussions will address formal and thematic features of these writings. Based on these discussions, students will write papers that draw upon the readings to support original and consequential interpretations. 

Section: 600 #4449
Instructor:  Koppang, T.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

Mike Erganian: Good, I like non-fiction. There is so much to know about this world. I think you read something somebody just invented, waste of time.

Miles Raymond: That’s an interesting perspective. 

Can you give an accurate definition of fiction? How sure are you that authors respect the same boundaries between “truth” and fabrication? What special power do we give to works labeled “fiction”? In fact, why read fiction at all? In this course, we will explore the places where fiction pushes up against the boundaries of non- fiction. We will seek to explode the idea of genre, text, and author as stable entities. In novels, short stories, and essays, we will tackle works from around the turn of the 20th century through the turn of the 21st. Expect to see fiction from both traditional literature as well as a few examples from the more mind-bending genres like science fiction and horror. 

Exploring Shakespeare (ENGL 274)

Section: 03W #3604
Instructor: Knapp, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

ENGL 274-03W is a writing intensive class. 

Please note: English Majors should take ENGL 326, not ENGL 274. 

Section: 04W #3856
Instructor: Strain, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

In numerous works that mastered and innovated the literary forms trending in the late sixteenth century, Shakespeare probed the major cultural and political topics of his day, from the nature of love and friendship to the nature of political leadership. Significantly, he returns again and again to the relationship between language and thought, and thought and action. We will examine Shakespeare’s language use and plots in the context of the early modern commercial theater (its material conditions and literary trends) and the poetic and rhetorical traditions disseminated through Elizabethan grammar schools. Shakespeare’s plays and poems represent a so- called common heritage yet they are utterly “foreign to us all,” distant from us in “time, language, and thought.” My assignments are designed to help students (1) overcome historical and linguistic barriers to comprehension, and (2) come to terms with material that resists simplification and assimilation. I present historical difference as an intellectual challenge and ultimately as an opportunity to reimagine the norms of current culture that can otherwise appear natural or inevitable. 

ENGL 274-04W is a writing intensive class.

Please note: English Majors should take ENGL 326, not ENGL 274. 

African-American Literature (ENGL 282)

Section: 05W #5510
Instructor: Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC

While the activist movement, Black Lives Matter, has garnered national attention since its inception in 2013, African-American literature has been concerned with asserting the value of black lives since the late 18th century. We will focus, in particular, on the ways that black writers (in the past and in the “now”) have attempted to assert their humanity, citizenship, and freedom in the U.S. for over two centuries. Some of the texts we will read are Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen. To complement our readings we will incorporate films, music, and visual art to demonstrate the multiple and diverse ways that black artistic culture has served as a means of political resistance, reflection and inspiration. Requirements for the course include one formal essay (7-10 pages-written in stages), weekly quizzes, and a mid-term. 

ENGL 282-05W is a writing intensive class. 

Women in Literature (ENGL 283)

Section: 06W #2327
Instructor: Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 10:25 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

Until recently, women were regularly barred from pulpit, courtroom, podium, laboratory, voting booth and most forms of participation in public life, and so, when they were fortunate enough to be able to read and write, they turned to literature to express their ideas, emotions, ethics, and spirituality. This course will focus on writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a women’s tradition. This tradition includes a wide range of perspectives, and speaks to both women and men. Our readings will include poetry, fiction, essays, and speeches composed between the medieval through contemporary eras. 

Because it is writing-intensive, this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer. Assignments include in-class reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a term paper, mid-term and final examination. 

ENGL 283-06W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 07W #1921
Instructor: Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., LSC 

Until recently, women were regularly barred from pulpit, courtroom, podium, laboratory, voting booth and most forms of participation in public life, and so, when they were fortunate enough to be able to read and write, they turned to literature to express their ideas, emotions, ethics, and spirituality. This course will focus on writings by women, beginning with contemporary writers and moving back through history to trace the origins and evolution of a women’s tradition. This tradition includes a wide range of perspectives, and speaks to both women and men. Our readings will include poetry, fiction, essays, and speeches composed between the medieval through contemporary eras. 

Because it is writing-intensive, this course incorporates a variety of assignments that are specifically designed to help you become a better writer. Assignments include in-class reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a term paper, mid-term and final examination. 

ENGL 283-07W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 08W #2057
Instructor: Bouson, J.B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

“If women have learned many of the ways they interpret their lives from the narrative schemata of novels and stories,” writes Joanne Fry, “they can also gain from fiction new insights into the narrative processes of constructing meaning.” Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 283 is designed to meet the “literary knowledge and experience” requirements of the Loyola Core. Focusing on literature written by 20th- and 21st- century women authors, this course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s lives and writings; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; to train them in the analysis of literature; and to teach them how to describe, analyze, and formulate arguments about literary texts. Analyzing representative works of fiction written by women authors, this course will investigate the important cultural and gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, the female body, romantic love, mother- child relationships, and female friendship in their works. The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, and Toni Morrison. There will be reading quizzes, papers, a midterm and a final exam. 

ENGL 283-08W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 09W #5511
Instructor: Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

Louise Bourgeois, “Femme Maison” (1946-47)

This course will focus on the feminist avant-garde, women writers and artists of the early to mid-twentieth-

century who produced experimental works and challenged conventional notions of gender. Our purpose will be

(1) to learn to read texts  (verbal and visual) in relation to their social and historical context, especially contemporaneous notions of gender, and (2) to analyze literature in terms of its narrative techniques. How do we read literature that doesn’t provide a linear plot, stable characters, or positive images of women? What effect do these artworks have on our notions of ourselves as gendered subjects? What are the political implications of such radical texts? We will read Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, and Djuna Barnes from the first half of the century, and Kathy Acker, Angela Carter, Harryette Mullen, and Jeanette Winterson from the second half. We will also read Nella Larsen, a more conventional novelist whose writing was indebted to Stein and has radical implications for our understanding of gender, race and class, and we will discuss contemporary visual artists. This course makes a case for why aesthetically difficult and intellectually challenging writers like those considered “avant-garde” still matter. 

ENGL 283-09W is a writing intensive class.

Religion and Literature (ENGL 287)

Section: 062 #4450
Instructor: Enright, L.
3.0 credit hours lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC 

In this core class, we will examine what it means to use both religion and literature to critically examine, challenge, and inspire one another. Specifically, we will be focusing on the period which we’ve come to call Modernism, studying texts from the World Wars up to the present moment. We will pay special attention to the ways in which the question of God has become increasingly difficult to address in the last century and how, even so, the religious imagination has continued to inspire the literary imagination (and vice versa) in engaging a world which is rapidly changing, sometimes dangerously so. Though heavily focused on the Judeo Christian tradition (Western and Eastern Christianities being the professor’s scholarly competence), this course will offer comparison and intersectional pieces in the Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist traditions. This is a creation focused course, and so assignments will include short papers and presentations, creative writing or other media, personal research, and NO tests.

Human Values in Literature (ENGL 290)

Section: 11W #4452
Instructor:  Mann, H.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

NON-WESTERN VOICES

Adopting an international and cross-disciplinary perspective, this section of English 290 will examine the portrayal of human values in modern and contemporary works by selected non-western writers from Africa, the West Indies, South Asia, and USA. Our main aim will be to examine the extent to which the societies under study (and the individuals who constitute them) share universal values and the extent to which these societies and their values are predicated upon culture specific norms and expectations. To this end, we will consider the role of nationalism, tradition, religion, race, ethnicity, gender, and class/caste in the conception and practice of such values. In addition, we will analyze the cultural bases of contributing literary techniques, including structure, language, narrative focus, and characterization among others, to arrive at comparative assessments of the portrayal of human values in modern world literature. 

Please note that this course is Writing Intensive; satisfies 3 credits of the Core Curriculum Tier-II requirement in Literary Knowledge & Experience; counts as a 200-level elective for both the English major and minor; and meets the 3-credit multicultural requirement of the English major

ENGL 290-11W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 063 #3442
Instructor:  Jay, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

Many academic disciplines explore values and how they get determined across cultures. Economists are interested in economic value, sociologists and anthropologists in social and cultural values, ecologists in the value of nature, people in religious studies in spiritual values, and, of course, philosophers explore the very question of what a value is and how values get determined. Literary writers and literary scholars are also interested in the exploration of values, but there’s something unique about the exploration of values in literature. Instead of being studied quantitatively or empirically, we explore the representation of values in forms of writing that actually dramatize people struggling with competing values in their everyday lives. Literary writing, then, is a unique artistic laboratory for exploring what people value, and how to balance competing values. In this course we will focus on fiction and poetry from the 20th and 21st centuries that explores a wide and competing range of human values by writers with diverse cultural backgrounds. We’ll try to identify enduring, seemingly timeless values, but we’ll also track how values change, how new values emerge and sometimes compete with or supersede traditional ones, especially in the modern and postmodern periods. Readings will include fiction, drama, and poetry by a wide range of modern and contemporary writers. Requirements will include short essays and a longer final paper. 

Grammar: Principles and Pedagogy (ENGL 303)

Section: 601 #2499
Instructor: Stogner, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC

Humans are language-producing animals, so in a sense our language is something we already “know.” But do we understand how it really works? The goal of this course is to analyze the structure of that language, to unlock the secrets behind the meaning we produce innately. We will explore English grammar not only as a list of rules and regulations that govern linguistic behavior, but also as a means of clearly conveying ideas in speech and writing. This course will examine all elements of English grammar from parts of speech and how they function in a sentence to punctuation and how it enhances clear and precise prose. We will also gain an appreciation for the English language and investigate techniques for using language effectively in speech and writing. This course is required for students planning to teach high school English, but it is also open to others.

Studies in Women Writers (ENGL 306C)

Section: 064 #4915
Instructor: Bouson, J. B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., LSC 

Crosslisted with Women’s Studies, English 306 will focus on literature written by twentieth- and twenty-first- century women authors. This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of women’s writings and to understand the ways in which women novelists use fiction to challenge inherited cultural and literary assumptions; to show them the difference gender makes to the writing, reading, and interpretation of literature; and to help them become familiar with the application of feminist theory to works by women authors. In English 306, the Instructor will provide necessary background information on the works covered and will model how to perform close readings of literary texts as she guides students in the investigation of  the structures and strategies of representative works of women-authored fiction. The Instructor will also place emphasis on the gender scripts and psychological dramas encoded in the works read in the course, paying special attention to the various ways the authors represent coming of age, coming to age, the female body, romantic love, mother- child relationships, and female friendships in their works. The authors covered will include Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, Toni Morrison, and Nancy Mairs. There will be reading quizzes, papers, a midterm and a final exam. 

This course fulfills the post-1900 period requirement of the English major. 

The Writing of Poetry (ENGL 317)

Section: 065 #1923
Instructor: Goldstein, L.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC 

This course approaches the writing of poetry as both a study and craft that requires reading, exploration, practice, and sharing. We read a unique work of contemporary poetry each week as a framework for discussion, but the core of the course is student writing. The workshop element of the course includes prompts for writing in class and between classes, in-class collective experiments, and presentations of student poetry to the group. Students produce a final collection of poetry presented as a self-published chapbook in a final reading. 

Section: 066 #1925
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., LSC

 

Section: 067 #3443
Instructor: Baker, A.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. LSC 

This course offers practice and instruction in the techniques and analysis of poetry through reading, writing, discussing, and revising poems. We will give particular attention to the  unique  challenges  and opportunities facing beginning poets as we first seek to channel our ideas and life experiences into poetry, to find and then develop our own voices in relation to not only our own impulses but to "the tradition" and the aesthetically diverse and fascinating world of contemporary poetry. The poems you write will be carefully read and critiqued by both your classmates and the Instructor. The culmination of the course will be to compile a portfolio of the work you have written over the term. 

The Writing of Fiction (ENGL 318)

Section: 068 #1926
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC

 

Section: 069 #2879
Instructor:  Kaplan, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
 

Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction through (a) reading master writers such as Sandra Cisneros, Alice Walker, Banana Yoshimoto, Truman Capote, Jim Harrison, James Salter, and others, to analyze their craft; (b) writing three original short stories; and (c) having these stories discussed and critiqued by the Instructor and by fellow students in a supportive workshop environment.  Class participation is emphasized.  Fulfills a Core Expressive Arts Requirement. 

Section: 602 #2017
Instructor: Kaplan, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

Students will learn the art and craft of writing fiction through (a) reading master writers such as Sandra Cisneros, Alice Walker, Banana Yoshimoto, Truman Capote, Jim Harrison, James Salter, and others, to analyze their craft;

(b) writing three original short stories; and (c) having these stories discussed and critiqued by the Instructor and

by fellow students in a supportive workshop environment.  Class participation is emphasized.  Fulfills a Core Expressive Arts Requirement.

Writing Creative Nonfiction (ENGL 319)

Section: 070 #4029
Instructor: TBA
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC

 

Studies in Medieval Literature (ENGL 323)

Section: 071 #4958
Instructor: Wheatley, E.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 12:35 p.m. – 1:25 p.m., LSC 

Uses of the Supernatural in Medieval Literature

This  course  will  examine  romances  and  related  literature  on  medieval  England  in  which  writers  deploy supernatural forces or characters. We will analyze these texts in their social and historical contexts in order to elucidate what the supernatural might have meant to medieval readers. Readings will include the Lais of Marie de France, some of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and anonymous romances in verse. Although some readings will be in modern English translations, others will be in the original Middle English. The final grade will be based on class participation, weekly reading responses, an oral report, a mid-term exam, two essays, and a final exam. 

British Literature: The Renaissance (ENGL 325)

Section: 072 #1927
Instructor: Biester, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 11:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m., LSC 

In this course we will study the works of selected English authors of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, examining the intellectual and social contexts in which their poetry was produced as well as the literary traditions they employed and transformed. Requirements will include participation in class discussion, papers, a midterm, and a final. 

The Plays of Shakespeare (ENGL 326)

Section: 073 #1928
Instructor: Knapp, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

British Literature: Victorian Period (ENGL 340)

Section: 075 #1929
Instructor: Clarke, M.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MWF 1:40 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., LSC

The purpose of this course is to guide students toward better understanding and appreciation of Victorian literature, that is, literature written in England between 1837 and 1901. This course will help students improve their ability to analyze and interpret literature, and to understand the ideas, attitudes, and techniques that characterize the literature of this important historical period. Lectures will provide information on intellectual and cultural contexts in which the literature was written, and class discussions will encourage students to reflect on and respond to the works that continue to have a presence in contemporary culture. We will read essays, poems, short fiction, one play, and at least one novel written during the period. This course fulfills the post- 1700/pre-1900 period requirement for English majors. Assignments include in-class reflection papers (some to be written in class and others at home), a term paper, mid-term and final examination. 

British Literature since 1900 (ENGL 345)

Section: 076 #5512
Instructor:  Wexler, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m., LSC 

Twentieth-century literature is often interpreted as an expression of new theories of the individual subject, but it was also a response to social upheavals. This course will ask how the new forms of the early twentieth century represent the political violence of the period. Like James Joyce, many writers spoke of history as a “nightmare.” This metaphor suggests the unimaginable quality of events as well as the difficulty of describing them. Despite the Left’s objections to the use of symbolic forms to represent historical events, the indeterminacy of these forms suited a secular age. The problem of representing violence in a secular age is addressed in the primary texts of the course: selected poems and novels including Heart of Darkness, Women in Love, The Waste Land, Mrs. Dalloway, and Midnight's Children. 

Contemporary Critical Theory (ENGL 354)

Section: 077 #3444
Instructor:  Caughie, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC

René Magritte, “The Subjugated Reader” (1928)

“The main effect of theory,” writes Jonathan Culler, “is the disputing of ‘common sense’” (Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, 4). Whether the topic is language or reality, sex or race, literature or authors, theory refuses to take such concepts at face value, as “givens.” Theory teaches us how to question what we often take for granted. If this course succeeds, then, it should produce a kind of crisis—a crisis of meaning, a crisis of confidence, a crisis of language—as we unlearn certain habitual ways of thinking. We will read theories from a range of disciplines (e.g., linguistics, literature, history, sociology, psychoanalysis, philosophy) and “schools” (e.g., formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, Marxism) from the 1960s through the present to understand how the theory revolution has changed the study of literature and culture. We will also read literature, but not simply to “apply” the theory to a work. Instead we will read literature as theory, just as we will “close read” theory as a type of literature. Requirements include two essays (3-5 and 6-8 pages), responses to the readings, a report on an outside reading, and a final exam. Our primary texts will be Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd edition, edited by Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, and Steve Venturino’s Complete Idiot’s Guide to Literary Theory & Criticism

Studies in Poetry (ENGL 362B)

Section: 078 #
Instructor: Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m., LSC 

The Book of God and the Bible of Hell

In the middle of the eighteenth century, a professor at Oxford entertained an astonishing hypothesis: the Bible wasn’t the revealed word of God, gifted by inspiration to Moses, the prophets, and the Apostles. It was instead a book like any other, fabricated by human hands and scripted by human agendas—in his words, “poetry,” and like all poetry, should be understood by resituating its forms and metaphors in the human history that produced them. His thesis shook the Christian world, and as we’ll see, the concepts of miracle, spirituality, and God himself would never be the same. We’ll read some of the most exhilarating philosophical arguments about the nature (or nonexistence) of God ever produced. But our real focus will be on the transformations in the concept of literature that ensued. As the empire of poetry spread over even the Book of God, poets were exhilarated at the possibility of writing new Gospels; with characteristic bravado, William Blake threatened, “I have also: The Bible of Hell: which the world shall have whether they will or no.” We will “will” it, following Blake deep into his infernal scripture; along the way, we’ll meet a host of charmingly disreputable characters in the poetry of Percy Shelley, Lord  Byron, and  Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Fulfills literature from  1700-1900 and/or before  1900 requirements for the English major, will be awesome.

Comparative American Literature (ENGL 381)

Section: 079 #5514
Instructor: Ahad, B.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m., LSC 

This course  will  consider  the  concept  of  diaspora,  comparatively,  across  a  diverse  range  of Americanist literatures and cultures. Specifically, we will explore efforts by people of African descent throughout the Americas to forge the contours of a global community—also known as a “diaspora—through both visual and literary means. The guiding questions we will consider are: how do black writers and artists throughout the Americas imagine the African diaspora? How are African diasporic identities both constructed and produced in these spaces? How might we redefine the notion of diaspora beyond Middle Passage narratives to incorporate 20th and 21st modes of “travel” (exile, expatriation, heritage tourism, etc.)? What is the meaning of “black” identity in a global context? This course will introduce students to a wide selection of literary and theoretical/critical works from the Americas (the US, Latin America and the Caribbean), as well as film and print media. Students should expect to participate regularly in class discussions, complete a number of response papers (1 page each) to enhance class discussion, and a short essay (5-7 pages). There will be a mid-term exam for this course. This course fulfills the post-1900 and multicultural literature requirement.

Theology and Literature (ENGL 383)

Section: 12W #5515
Instructor: Deane, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC

A Faith in Poetry

For two millennia the person of Christ has been at the centre of thought and of art in the west. There is a rich and varied corpus of poetry that has engaged with the person of Christ, and has done so while mastering the art and craft of poetry as a vehicle to study faith. Poetry adds several dimensions to the personal awareness of Christ, mostly an imaginative and oblique approach that can refresh Christian faith at times of doubt and hesitation. The course, “A Faith in Poetry”, will range through this Christian heritage, from the great Anglo-Saxon poem, The Dream of the Rood, through the “metaphysical” poets, John Donne, George Herbert, the so-called “Odds and Sods Men”, farmer poets like John Clare and Patrick Kavanagh; studies of American poets like Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Denise Levertov and the contemporary Christian Wiman, will be set beside Irish and British poets, such as Seamus Heaney, R.S. Thomas, David Gascoyne and of course the great Gerard Manley Hopkins. The poetry will be seen to be absorbed in the approach to Christ as Redeemer, Friend, Antagonist. . . and the development of faith through poetry after Darwin and Einstein, into contemporary times. A complementary series of explorations into how poetry is written, will be offered, with the aim of reaching insights from within a poem, as well as readings of poetry from an objective and critical stance. 

John F. Deane, a renowned Irish poet, is the Teilhard de Chardin Fellow in Catholic Studies for fall, 2016. 

ENGL 383-12W is a writing intensive class.

Advanced Seminar: (ENGL 390)

Section: 13W #2329
Instructor:  Jay, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., LSC

American Literature in a Global World

The course will focus on contemporary literature written by U.S.-based writers who set American experience in a transnational historical, cultural, and political context. While American literature has been profoundly shaped by immigrants from its inception, the last fifty years have witnessed an explosion of U.S. literature produced by a dramatically diverse group of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, East Asia, India, Pakistan, and Eastern Europe. Some of the writers we’ll be reading were born abroad but have come to live and work in the U.S. (Jhumpa Lahiri from India, Viet Thanh Nguyen from Vietnam, Aleksandar Hemon from Bosnia, Teju Cole and Chimamanda Adichie from Nigeria, and Junot Díaz from the Dominican Republic), while others, such as Julie Otsuka, Chang- rae Lee, and Yelena Achtiorskya were born in the U.S. of parents who had recently immigrated to the U.S. Together these writers present a unique and provocative composite literary picture of life in the U.S. (and abroad) in an increasingly globalizing world. Requirements will include two short critical essays and a longer seminar paper. This course fulfils the English department’s multicultural literature requirement. 

ENGL 390-13W is a writing intensive class. 

Section: 14W #6207
Instructor: Eggert, P.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC 

HEROISM, BANDITRY AND MANHOOD

Growing up demands compromise. Incipient revolt normally gives way to conventionality and domesticity. But what happens when it doesn’t? Literature is full of such cases: but why? This course looks historically at the problem via imaginative explorations of outlawry, heroism and crises in manhood from the fifteenth to the early twenty-first centuries. The course spans poetry, manifesto, novels  and films and explores the nature of adaptation as a wide-reaching phenomenon of popular, literary and stage culture.

ENGL 390-14W is a writing intensive class. 

Teaching English to Adults (ENGL 393)

[Prerequisite for ENGL 393 is permission and variable credit agreement form]

Section: 01E #1930
Instructor: Heckman, J.
1.0 - 3.0 credit hours Internship
MTWR 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., LSC
 

Teaching English to Adults: 1, 2, or 3 credit hours 

English 393: Engaging with Jesuit values. This course offers an excellent opportunity for service learning and practical experience in tutoring adults in written and spoken English at the Loyola Community Literacy Center, located in Loyola Hall, 1110 W. Loyola Avenue, 2nd floor conference room, across the street from Mertz. 

While the Literacy Center offers community adults an opportunity to improve their skills, it also gives student- tutors the chance to serve their community and to engage with their Jesuit education. As one student-tutor wrote, "The Literacy Center is a program that enables students to truly embrace the Jesuit tradition. It is a place that allows students to encounter something outside of themselves, . . . . . connecting the heart with the head." 

No previous tutoring experience is necessary. When taken for 3 credit hours, this course satisfies the Core Engaged Learning-Service Learning Internship requirement.  The course is open to second-semester freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, although incoming freshmen are always welcome to tutor as volunteers and take the course at a later date. 

Students tutor adult learners, some of whom are native English speakers preparing for the GED or improving their literacy skills. Other learners are international visitors, or immigrants or refugees whose skills in their native language range from their being highly educated professionals to being perhaps illiterate, even in their own language, and who may know some English or no English. 

The Center is open for tutoring M-Th evenings during the fall and spring semesters from 7-9:30 pm when the university is in session. 1 credit hour students tutor one evening per week; 2 and 3 credit hour students tutor two evenings a week. 

If students have never tutored at the Center, they must attend one evening of orientation. All students attend bi-weekly class meetings (5 meetings per semester for 1-2 credit hour students, 6 class meetings per semester for 3 credit hour/Core students). Students keep a weekly journal of their experiences; examine a textbook and journal articles concerned with literacy, language, and adult education; submit ten of their journals and five short papers throughout the semester; prepare a final paper or project; and, for 3 credit hour students, read and report on one additional text of their choice related to the work of the Center, to adult literacy, to the culture of their learners, or to any topic suggested by their tutoring experience. 

One student who was enrolled in one of our Literacy Center courses said, “I can’t say I’ve been in a nicer environment on Loyola’s campus. Everyone is welcoming and treats everyone else with respect. And the time flies by because I love what I’m doing.” Students who have taken this course have found it to be a challenging and exciting experience, even life changing as they help neighborhood adults improve their skills. 

More information can be found at www.luc.edu/literacy. Follow the links to "tutoring" and then "course credit tutoring" for a complete description of English 393/Honors 290.

Internship (ENGL 394)

[Prerequisite for ENGL 394 is permission]

Section: 02E #1931
Instructor: Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Internship 

English 394 provides practical, on-the-job experience for English majors in adapting their writing and analytical skills to the needs of such fields as publishing, editing, and public relations. Students must have completed six courses in English and must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher before applying for an internship. Qualified second semester juniors and seniors may apply to the program. Interested students must arrange to meet with the Internship Director during the pre-registration period and must bring with them a copy of their Loyola transcripts, a detailed resume (which includes the names and phone numbers of at least two references), and at least three writing samples. Students may be required to conduct part of their job search on-line and to go out on job interviews before the semester begins. Course requirements include: completion of a minimum of 120 hours of work; periodic meetings with the Internship Director; a written evaluation of job performance by the site supervisor; a term paper, including samples of writing produced on the job. 

Honors Tutorial (ENGL 395) 

Section: 15W #1932
Instructor: Chinitz, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., LSC 

T. S. Eliot

One of the most influential and intensely debated figures in modern literature, T. S. Eliot is known, on the one hand, for his pioneering experimental poetry, and, on the other hand, for his later work expressing Christian feeling. His critical writings dominated the study of literature for half a century; his plays ran on Broadway; his poems for children became the musical Cats. In this seminar, we will study a broad range of Eliot’s work— poems, plays, and essays—in its literary and cultural contexts as we follow his career from its early years through its “high modernist” phase and on to its later stages. Representative texts include “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “Tradition and the Individual Talent,” The Waste Land, “The Hollow Men,” Four Quartets, and The Cocktail Party

ENGL 395-15W is a writing intensive class.  

Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry (ENGL 397) 

[Prerequisite: ENGL 317]

S
ection: 16W #2059
Instructor: Baker, A. 
3.0 credit hours Lecture
F 2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m., LSC

In this advanced poetry workshop, we will seek to deepen our engagement with poetry as an art form—both as readers and writers. Through reading, writing, and workshopping, we will grow more familiar with the anatomy and texture of poetry: image, word, voice, syntactical configurations, rhetorical devices— stanza, line, punctuation, and page. Your work will be given a great deal of individual attention in our workshops, and you will be offered the opportunity to work very closely with the Instructor as you write and revise your final project for the course—a portfolio of your best work. 

ENGL 397-16W is a writing intensive class. 

Advanced Writing Workshop: Fiction (ENGL 398)

[Prerequisite: ENGL 318]

S
ection: 17W #1933
Instructor: Kaplan, D.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., LSC 

A fiction writing workshop for those who have already taken English 318 (a prerequisite), which builds upon concepts of fictional art and craft studied there. Students will write original stories which will be discussed and critiqued by the Instructor and by one's fellow writers in a supportive workshop environment. Students will also read and discuss the craft of master fiction writers, such as Sandra Cisneros, Alice Walker, Banana Yoshimoto, Truman Capote, Jim Harrison, James Salter, and others. Class participation is emphasized. 

ENGL 398-17W is a writing intensive class. 

Special Studies in Literature (ENGL 399)

Section: 080 #1934
Instructor: Cragwall, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture

Students arrange for this course on an individual basis by consulting a faculty member who agrees to supervise the independent study. When the student and the faculty member have agreed on the work to be done, the student submits the plan to the director of undergraduate programs for approval and registration. Usually students will work independently and produce a research paper, under the direction of the faculty member.



GRADUATE COURSES

 Introduction to Graduate Study (ENGL 400)

Section:  800 #1935
Instructor:  Kerkering, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
M 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

This course introduces incoming graduate students to important issues in the profession of literary studies. It offers insights into current critical theories and methodologies as well as discussion of research techniques and bibliographic methods. Students will write weekly response papers and annotated bibliographies, two short papers (6-8 pp), and a longer final paper (10-12 pages).

Feminist Theory and Criticism (ENGL 426)

Section: 801 #5516
Instructor: Bost, S.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
W 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

This course will introduce students to important questions, developments, and approaches in contemporary Feminist Theory – including women of color feminisms, postmodern feminisms, queer theory, disability feminisms, and global feminisms, among others. Our readings from anthologies will present breadth and diversity of arguments and styles to be balanced by in-depth exploration of the different critical trajectories of two leading theorists, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Donna Haraway. Course assignments are designed to engage students in a real practice of Feminist Theory, including regular written responses, discussion leadership, and a final seminar paper. Most of the readings will be challenging, and there are many difficult ideas to absorb from these readings, but there will also be much room for student contributions, dissent, debate, and fun.

Dramatic Theory (ENGL 427)

Section: 802 #5517
Instructor:  Foster, V.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
R 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

In this course we will explore some of the major historical and theoretical approaches to the study of drama from the Greeks to the present. Our discussions will focus on plays as well as on theoretical readings. After surveying classical (Plato and especially Aristotle), neoclassical, and romantic views of drama and in particular dramatic genre (tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy), we will devote the greater part of the course to an examination of modern and contemporary approaches to the study of theatre and drama. We will focus on realism (Ibsen, Moi), naturalism (Zola, Strindberg), expressionism (Strindberg), theatre of cruelty (Artaud), epic theatre (Brecht), theatre of the absurd (Esslin, Ionesco), semiotics (Elam), and feminist theories of drama (Reinelt, Churchill). We will conclude by discussing adaptation, reception, audience, performance, theatre and film, and the place of dramatic literature in the academy. (Names of authors in parentheses represent a selection from those we will be reading.) ASSIGNMENTS: (a) Paper (15-20 pages; two drafts) exploring a chosen play or plays in light of some aspect of dramatic theory or exploring the usefulness of some aspect of dramatic theory in terms of a chosen play or plays. (b) Class Participation: contributing to class discussion, introducing topics for class discussion, and offering practical applications of aspects of dramatic theory (by way of brief in-class performance or brief video presentation). For one presentation a short paper (4-5 pages) is due one week after the presentation.

Topics in Early Modern Literature & Culture (ENGL 450)

Section:  803 #5518
Instructor: Biester, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
MW 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., LSC 

This course will examine magic and the representation of magic in the literature and culture of the early modern period, or Renaissance, when ideas about magic overlapped with ideas about nature and science, religion, social and political hierarchy, gender, and crime. To explore how magic intersected with these various spheres of the culture, and how writers envisioned their art in relation to magic, we will read texts in a variety of genres, including plays, poems, ballads, witchcraft pamphlets, and selections from treatises on magical practices, and consider a variety of approaches to the study of magic. Requirements will include short and long papers, presentations in class, and possibly a take-home final exam. 

Early American Literature (ENGL 491)

Section:  804 #5520
Instructor: Glover, J.
3.0 credit hours Lecture
T 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., LSC 

New World Narratives

In this course, we will undertake a comparative survey of the English-­­language literatures of the early Atlantic world. Our aim will be to situate English colonial writing in a broader context that included Spanish, French, Dutch and Native cultures. Our readings will range across a number of genres, including settlement histories, spiritual autobiography, and captivity narratives, as well as several different forms of media, including print, manuscript, oratory and performance. We will discuss topics such as conquest and discovery, religion and magic, intercultural encounter, independence movements and nationhood, states as publishers, and the theory and practice of international law. Our focus throughout will be on written and printed artifacts rather than anthologized texts. 

American Literature since 1914 (ENGL 494)

Section:  805 #5521
Instructor: Bosco, M.
3.1  credit hours Lecture
T 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., LSC 

The “Age of Crisis” in 20th Century American Literature 

Building on Mark Greif’s The Age of The Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973 (Princeton University Press, 2015), this course will look at the intellectual trope of “crisis” in American literary history. How do the questions of modernity and postmodernity become embedded in or provide for an existential analysis of the nature of human persons? We will read a survey of novels and short stories that excavate ways that American literature—as much as philosophy, politics, and theology—engage the question of being and the deep moral convictions about human meaning and flourishing that were so much a part of the intellectual life of 20th century America. 

Authors/Titles

  • E. Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises
  • W. Faulkner, Light in August
  • S. Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March
  • F. O’Connor, The Complete Short Stories and Wise Blood
  • T. Morrison, Beloved
  • D. DeLillo, White Noise
  • C. McCarthy, Blood Meridian