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Spring 2018 Workshops

Workshops_2017-18

Spring 2018 Workshops 

Digital Humanities Pedagogy Tool Kit with Becca Parker

Friday, January 19th 12:30-2 pm

Particpants will explore the benefits and concerns of digital learning during a hand-on presentation of several digital humanities tools and sample assignments that incorporate these technologies.


Confessions of a Managing Editor: Article Publishing for Graduate Students with Liz Hopwood

Friday, February 9th 12:30-2 pm


Git/hub, Command line, Markdown with Neha Goel, Abdur Khan, and Becca Parker

Friday, March 2nd 12-2 pm


Text Analysis with Voyant with Niamh McGuigan

Friday, April 6th 12:30-2 pm

 

 

Fall 2017 Workshops

Text Mining Using the HathiTrust Research Portal with Niamh McGuigan

The HathiTrust Digital Library is a massive collection of digitized texts from the world’s research libraries, and the HathiTrust  Research Portal provides tools to analyze this collection. Niamh McGuigan, Head of Reference Services at Cudahy Library, provided an introduction to using the HTRC Portal to create work sets, run textual analysis tools, and interpret analysis results. The workshop was held from 12:30 pm until 2:00 pm on Friday, October 27th in the CTSDH located on the 3rd Floor of Loyola Hall in Room 318. Slides are available here: http://bit.ly/2ySdE1w.

Podcasting Workshop with Jonathan B. Singer

Award-winning podcaster Jonathan Singer led the first of the Fall 2017 CTSDH workshops, "Podcasting: Why, How and You", at 12:30 pm on Friday, September 1st in the CTSDH. Podcasting has been around since 2004 but entered a golden age with the Serial Podcast. Millions of people are podcasting and advertisers are pouring millions of dollars into them. So why would an academic want to podcast when you could write a book, a chapter, an article, or just have coffee with your colleague? Is it really as easy as everyone says it is to create a podcast? If so, why am I not doing it already? Jonathan B. Singer, Ph.D., LCSW, associate professor of social work and founder and host of the award-winning Social Work Podcast answered these questions and more. Jonathan's slides are available here: http://bit.ly/CTSDH17_PodcastingSlides and notes from CTSDH Digital Fellow, Rebecca Parker, are available here: http://bit.ly/CTSDH17_PodcastingNotes.

Spring 2018 Lunchtime Lectures

Spring 2018 Lunchtime Lectures 

The Spirit of Notetaking: Traditional Research and Writing Strategies for the 21st Century

Thursday, February 1st 12:30-1:30 pm
George Thiruvathukal and David Dennis


Translating the Revolution: The Newberry's French Revolution Pamphlets Digital Initiative

Wednesday, February 14th 12:30-1:30 pm
Matthew Clarke and Jen Wolfe
 

Digital Affect and the Marginalized Body: Pondering an Autoethnographic Turn in the Digital Humanities

Wednesday, March 14th 12:30-1:30 pm
Frederick Staidum Jr.
 

From the Attic to the Web: Building the May Weber Ethnographic Digital Collection

 
Wednesday, April 11th 12:30-1:30 pm
Catherine Nichols, Lucas Coyne, Andi Pacheco, and Adam Depew
 

 

Past Fall 2017 Lunchtime Lectures

Explorations towards a new edition of Walton's Boethius

Wednesday, November 29th 12:30 pm

Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy (c. 525) was one of the most influential literary works in medieval Europe. The Consolation was translated into English three times before the advent of print, but the most successful of these early English translations remains very little known to modern readers. Ian Cornelius, Nicholas Coteus, and Lex Podell discussed the thinking and process of creating a new edition of the 1410 English translation of this important work. 

Turn Around – Experiencing a Story in 360 VR

Wednesday, October 18th 12:30 pm 

When a camera covers all angles in a shot, how may a story be scripted in narrative? When nothing can be hidden around the camera, how may technical setup enhance storytelling? 360 VR visual production and presentation are facing challenges both in the methodology of telling a story and technology of implementing storytelling. In this presentation, Jamason Chen led the audience in an exploration of new ideas and methods of storytelling in a virtual reality environment.

Exploring Common Sense: Creating a Digital Critical Edition

Wednesday, September 13th 12:30 pm

Explore Common Sense (explorecommonsense.com) is a digital critical edition of the first British edition of Thomas Paine's pamphlet Common Sense, which is notable for the redactions that prevented the printer from being arrested for seditious libel. Creators Kate Johnson, Marie Pellissier, and Kelly Schmidt will discuss the process of working with an original copy of the text in University Archives and Special Collections, creating the site, and its potential as both an interpretive and learning tool inside and outside of the classroom.

Transformative Digital Humanities: Scrutinizing Structures, Rethinking Representation

A Day Conference | March 23, 2018 | 9AM - 5:30PM

Information Commons, Fourth Floor


In 2018, how have digital humanities scholars taken up the call to expand the literary and historical canon to include groups that have been understudied or misrepresented by the print record? What does an intersectional, feminist DH methodology look like, who or what is it transforming, and how might we practice it in our own institutions? Transformative Digital Humanities: Scrutinizing Structures, Rethinking Representation asks how digital work might better support the knowledge and cultural production of women and people of color.

We invite humanities scholars, librarians, archivists, digital historians, and others to connect and participate in a day of discussion that will address questions about the organizational and technical infrastructures needed to support transformative digital research, and consider alternative modes of representing gender and race in digital archives.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Susan Brown (Guelph), Kim Gallon (Purdue), Laura Mandell (Texas A&M).

What's Happening at the CTSDH - Spring 2018

Check out the CTSDH Spring 2018 Flyer‌‌. It has info about all the workshops, lectures, conferences, and more coming to the CTSDH this Spring!

Digital Accessibility: Assessing, Amending, and Advancing Digital Content for All

digiA11yAnnounce

A Day Conference | February 23, 2018 | 8:45AM - 4PM

Klarchek Information Commons, 4th Floor

How can we build digital resources that incorporate accessible, universal design principles from start to finish? How can existing websites and projects be re-examined and remediated to incorporate these principles? And how do institutions move forward towards a future where accessibility is intrinsic in the way we write, learn, and create digital content?

Loyola University Chicago’s Digital Humanities MA students are proud to announce a one-day conference to be held February 23rd, 2018 at our Lakeshore Campus. Digital Accessibility: Assessing, Amending, and Advancing Digital Content for All will take place from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. and the day’s events will include three panels, a luncheon, and a digital accessibility edit-a-thon. We invite all those interested in implementing digital accessibility in their personal and scholarly digital projects, websites, and resources to attend.

Please consider answering our CALL FOR PANELISTS by filling out this brief google form: http://bit.ly/CFP_digiA11y. The deadline for submitting is January 15, 2018 and panelists will be notified of acceptance by January 22, 2018.

We are looking for individuals or project teams concerned with accessibility who have interests, experience, and/or skills in creating and remediating digital content. This conference is meant as an opportunity for digital accessibility novices and experts to meet and discuss key concepts, concerns, and capabilities for individuals, project teams, and large organizations creating accessibility-aware digital content. We are open to having some panelists present via video-conferencing if unable to attend the conference in person.

Please share this post and the attached flyer‌ to all who may be interested! This conference is sponsored by the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (https://luc.edu/ctsdh/) at Loyola University Chicago. Questions and concerns should be directed to conference organizers Rebecca Parker  (rparker3@luc.edu) and Tyler Monaghan (tmonaghan@luc.edu).

Event updates will be made available on the CTSDH Facebook event page linked here - http://bit.ly/FB_digiA11y! Please be sure to tweet @LUCTSDH with the conference hashtag #LUCdigiA11y.

Thank you and we hope to see you in February!

 

-Rebecca Parker and Tyler Monaghan

Conference Organizers

"Stones" in Pennsylvania's Best Emerging Poets

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Stones
 by Taylor-Cate Brown

Quit then—turn around and stumble
Past the parts of me you took for granted.
The trees will rise to meet you, roots
Eager to claim the


Gravel and silt that rolled down my
Face when you kicked me. I’ll take the
Blame for your frustration; I relish
Seeing your tiny


Body vanish in the folds of my rugged
Skirt—ant-like and beady. The fault is mine,
Converging bodies must lift each other.
Summit me, I said,


Then we’ll talk of love. Did you know I was
Growing taller— steeper — every minute? If you knew,
I applaud your vain efforts; few men have
Stones enough to try.


Author Notes:

The poem is written in a loose Sapphic style where the matrix is dominated by trochees and dactyls. Though both originated in Ancient Greece, the Sapphic style differs from the Heroic style because it is made up of feminine syllable stresses as opposed to masculine iambs. The form consists of four-line stanzas with a shorter “Adonic” fourth line that has one dactyl and one trochee. I broke this rule in the last line to emphasize how the speaker is challenging masculinity.

Line Specific Notes:
2. Granted is a near homonym for granite, the substance that makes up the greatest interior portion of
mountains.
10, 11. Mountains are formed at converging plate boundaries and fault lines.


Resources for Purchasing Pennsylvania's Best Emerging Poets:

Z Publishing: 

https://www.zpublishinghouse.com/products/pennsylvanias-best-emerging-poets?variant=3731821297694

Amazon:

https://goo.gl/BY8Cvt  

Pie Social - Pizza Pie, Berry Pie, Any Pie is Good Pie!

piesocial

The Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities invites you to unwind and enjoy some pie. Finals week is approaching and we could all just use a little time away from studying to enjoy each other's company and some yummy pies. Feel free to bring your favorite sweet or savory pie to share. Can't bring a pie, bring a friend.

When: December 6th, 2017 at 5 PM - 6 PM

Where: Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH)

Room 318, Third Floor, Loyola Hall
1110 W. Loyola Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60626
 
To RSVP, please email Kyle Roberts at kroberts2@luc.edu
 
The center's steering committee will meet from 4 PM until 5 PM before the Pie Social. 
 

Information Sessions for Prospective Digital Humanities MA Students

infosession

Earn your Master’s degree in Digital Humanities at one of the nation’s oldest and most respected graduate programs. Learn first-hand the ways in which computational technologies are transforming how we ask – and seek to answer -- age-old humanistic questions. Gain a theoretical understanding of how technology shapes our lived experience while developing a practical knowledge for your chosen profession. Learn more.

If you are interested in learning more about our graduate program, please join us for an upcoming information session:

Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 6 PM

Philip H. Corboy Law Center, Room 305

25 E Pearson St

Chicago, IL 60611

REGISTER HERE!

Questions? Please email Dr. Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu).

Unable to join us but still want more information, click here to see a recording of our last online info session!

American Archives Month at Loyola

ArchivesMonth17

October is American Archives Month, and Loyola is joining archives from around the country in celebrating. 

Loyola University Chicago's Archives and Special Collections will hold Open House events featuring a behind-the-scenes tour at the following times:

  • Tuesday October 17, 11am-4pm
  • Friday, October 27, 11am-4pm
  • Tuesday, October 31, 11am-4pm

You can find the University Archives in Room 218 of Cudahy Library. You can check this event out on Facebook here.

And Loyola's Women and Leadership Archives will hold its own Open House event on Friday, October 27 from 1pm-4pm in their location on the third floor of Piper Hall. This is a great opportunity to explore some of the unique stories told through the WLA collections. Visit their web page to learn more about this exciting event!

As always, you can sign up for the Humanities Datebook to keep track of these events and more like them, all in one weekly email. 

An Afternoon at (Virtual) Walden

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WALDEN ON EXHIBIT AT CONCORD MUSEUM.

An Afternoon at (Virtual) Walden

A Panel Discussion with Tracy Fullerton (USC)

Monday, November 13th, 3-4:30 pm

Information Commons, 4th Floor

What does it mean to translate an iconic American text – Henry David Thoreau’s Walden – into a video game? Tracy Fullerton, Director of the University of Southern California Game Innovation Lab, and her team set out to do that with Walden: A Game, which recently won Game of the Year and Most Significant Impact at the Games for Change Festival. In honor of the bicentennial of the birth of Thoreau (1817-1862), one of America’s greatest environmentalists and essayists, Fullerton is coming to Loyola for a panel discussion about the game on Monday, November 13th, at 3 pm in the Klarchek Information Commons, 4th Floor.

Walden, A Game is a six-hour, exploratory narrative that begins in the summer of 1845 when Thoreau moved to the Pond and built his cabin there. You follow in his footsteps, surviving in the woods by finding food and fuel and maintaining your shelter and clothing. At the same time as you strive to survive off the land, you are encouraged to explore the beauty of the woods and the pond, which hold a promise of a sublime life beyond your basic needs. And, you can interact with characters from Thoreau's life including mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, sister Sophia Thoreau, editor Horace Greeley, activist A. Bronson Alcott, naturalist Louis Agassiz among others.

Following Fullerton’s talk, a panel of Loyola faculty and students from different disciplines across the university will reflect on their experience playing the game. Panelists include: Lucas Coyne (History), Meghan Dougherty (Digital Communication), Elizabeth Hopwood (English and Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities), Chris Peterson (Institute for Environmental Sustainability), and George Thiruvathukal (Computer Science), 

The event is sponsored by the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities and the University Libraries. 

Loyola Student Launches Girls Who Code Chapter

gwcneha

This autumn, CTSDH will launch a chapter of the national organization Girls Who Code (GWC) at Loyola University Chicago. GWC is a non-profit organization committed to closing the gender gap in technology by teaching girls in sixth through twelfth grade how to code. From its humble beginnings in New York City in 2010, the organization now has chapters in all fifty states and educates nearly 50,000 young women annually.

The idea to begin a chapter of GWC at Loyola came from Neha Goel, a graduate student in Computer Science and a CTSDH Graduate Fellow. Goel has long been interested in volunteering to teach students coding. When she was in high school, she noticed a significant gender gap in her classes and knew she wanted to do something to change it. “If we were taught coding like a language from early on, there would be no fear of coding,” says Goel. “I struggled a lot with coding until I was an undergraduate. I always wanted to teach young girls coding so that they could perform well in their undergraduate career and have coding as an option for their career.”

When Goel learned of a GWC chapter at the University of Illinois - Chicago, she offered to volunteer but they did not have any openings. Undeterred, she approached Liz Hopwood, CTSDH Project Manager and Instructor in Digital Humanities, about the possibility of starting a club. She found enthusiastic support from her fellow CTSDH Fellows, Maria Palacio Chrivri (MA ’17) and Ezgi Ilhan ’18. “The CTSDH played a major role in bringing GWC to Loyola,” Goel recalls. “One day last April we were discussing how the CTSDH could impact the community and I presented this idea. Dr.Hopwood, Dr. Roberts and the other CTSDH Fellows all were very excited about the possibility.” “CTSDH is thrilled to meet the newest generation of makers and builders. It’s so gratifying to work alongside ambitious, enthusiastic scholars like Neha, Maria, and Ezgi, who took it upon themselves to bring this chapter to Loyola,” says Liz Hopwood.

“Opening a chapter of Girls Who Code at Loyola aligns closely with the CTSDH’s objective to strengthen the university’s position as a leader in social justice through Digital Humanities approaches,” explains Dr. Kyle Roberts, Director of the Center. The club embraces Loyola’s spirit of community outreach and engagement by bringing Chicago Public School students from the surrounding neighborhoods to the heart of campus for free coding classes in the Information Commons on Saturday mornings during the term (classes will begin in October).

Support for this new initiative has come from across the Loyola community. The CTSDH agreed to organize the chapter and to staff it, with the support of the Computer Science Department. University Libraries generously made available space in the IC for the weekend classes. And a semester-long grant from Loyola’s Plan 2020 Student Innovation Fund has made it possible for the CTSDH to provide t-shirts, notebooks, and free lunches to club participants.

Learning how to code opens up a young girl’s interests not only in science and mathematics, but in virtually any discipline. “If a girl is interested in art, writing, or biology, she can create anything related to this using coding,” explains Goel. “This motivates girls to continue coding; it tells them that coding is not just about computer science, it doesn’t divert you from your interests.” This fall a number of young women will learn that first hand thanks to the vision of Neha Goel and Girls Who Code.


The fall session of Girls Who Code is ten weeks long and begins on October 7, running Saturday mornings from 10 am to 12 noon. There are also opportunities for student and faculty to be involved as instructors. No experience is necessary; full training will be provided. For more information, please email Neha Goel at ngoel@luc.edu.

CTSDH Launches Humanities Datebook

Humanities Datebook

The Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH) is proud to announce the launch of a new initiative: the Humanities Datebook. The Humanities Datebook is a weekly email distributed each Monday morning that contains a round-up of humanities-related events happening at Loyola for the upcoming weeks. It is for anyone - students, staff, faculty, community member -- who wants to stay abreast of the university’s rich offerings.

Loyola’s vibrant humanities community hosts a variety of events across campus each week, but it can be hard to keep track of them all. Events are advertised on departmental web pages, fliers, and mailing lists, but with so many different departments and centers, it’s easy for events to get lost in one’s inbox. That’s what inspired Ian Cornelius, Edward Surtz Associate Professor in the Department of English, to propose the Humanities Datebook: an easy-to-read digest of humanities events happening around Loyola, conveniently gathered  in one weekly email.

Cornelius reached out to Kyle Roberts, Director of the CTSDH, at the start of the semester with the idea. As the College’s only humanities-focused interdisciplinary center, the CTSDH was a natural home for the project. Cornelius viewed the cooperative effort as “a service to the wider humanities community at Loyola, with benefits to the Center in the form of increased visibility.” Roberts agreed, and together with CTSDH fellow Tyler Monaghan, the three began work on creating the Datebook.

From the beginning, the Datebook was conceived as an opt-in, rather than an opt-out system. This means that rather than sending the Datebook out to the Loyola community and giving them the option to unsubscribe, recipients need to visit the Datebook’s website and sign up to receive the mailing. For recipients, opt-in was crucial since receiving yet another unsolicited email blast would hurt, not help, the inbox bloat the Datebook was designed to counteract. “Opt-in means that recipients can feel truly invited to every event we send out, since an event organizer took the proactive step of submitting their event to the Datebook,” explains Monaghan. In turn, this gives organizers confidence that their submissions are reaching an engaged audience.

Cornelius, Roberts, and Monaghan are committed to evaluating and tweaking the Datebook as necessary. So far, the helpfulness and buy-in of the Loyola community have impressed Monaghan, who is responsible for managing the creation and distribution of each week’s mailing. “It’s been gratifying to see event submissions roll in, our mailing list grow, and most of all, the words of encouragement and helpful suggestions from faculty all across Loyola’s humanities community.”

“When I see all of the fantastic events that people are submitting to the Datebook,” explains Roberts, “I have begun to realize how much I’ve missed out on over my time here. At a time when the humanities have come under fire nationally, it’s important to be able to show the important work being sponsored by Loyola’s artists, librarians, historians, philosophers, literary critics, theologians, linguists, and others!”

To learn more about the Humanities Datebook, visit the Datebook’s page on the CTSDH website. You can view past Datebooks, sign up to receive the Datebook in your email inbox each week, or submit an event to be listed.

 

The Man Into Woman Project: transgender narratives, editorial practices, and the Digital Humanities

The Man Into Woman Project

 

The Man Into Woman Project aims to produce a comparative scholarly edition of Man Into Woman (or Fra Mand til Kvinde its original Danish version). A print edition will be published by Bloomsbury Academic (London) and it will be accompanied by a digital archive hosted by Loyola University Chicago’s Libraries and supported by the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities. This digital archive will provide searchable versions of all four editions of this work (Danish, German, British and American) as well as the German typescript and the first English language translation of the Danish edition. It will allow users to study how a narrative of transgender was shaped by cultural values, linguistic choices, and editorial decisions.

The conception of this project began years ago, in the Spring of 2012, when Dr. Pamela Caughie, the project director and Professor of English at Loyola, wrote an article comparing Man Into Woman with Orlando, by Virginia Woolf. After this first approach to Man Into Woman, Caughie decided to further explore this narrative and, with the aid of three students, Jonathan Reinhardt, Anthony Betori and Niamh McGuigan (M.A in Digital Humanities and current Head of Reference Services at the Loyola University Libraries) she started comparing the different editions of this work. The comparison between the works continued in the Summer of 2014 when, with the help of two graduate students, Anthony Betori and Hannah Gillow Kloster, who, Caughie performed and extensive comparison between the German, Danish, and American editions. The Man Into Woman Project officially began in 2016 when Dr. Caughie received a contract with Bloomsbury Publishing’s Modernist Archives to publish the printed scholarly edition and the support of the CTSDH and Loyola University Libraries for the development of the digital archive.

Quinn Christianson, who graduated from Loyola last December with a Bachelors in  Computer Science worked on the Man Into Woman Project during his last semester. Christianson started as an English major but switched to Computer Science after deciding that he wanted to go into Information/Library Science. He worked on the first stages of this digital project, helping with the book scanning of the different editions, as well as converting the resultant files into JPEGs that could be easily read by an OCR software. This experience contributed to his future professional plans: “I now know the steps that you have to take to get a project completed and the challenges that you are likely to run into”. Working on this project also allowed him to think more about the intersection of computing and the disciplines of the humanities and how these disciplines can complement each other. “I believe that the humanities and computing can compliment each other by humanities being living data and computing being the tools to process that data, so we can discover facts about people and the world,” he reflected.

Emily Datskos, an English Ph.D. student, has been working with the Man Into Woman Project for the past academic year. She got interested in being involved with  the project because this previously marginalized work deals with various topics related to her research interests in queer theory and gender, sexuality and trans theory, but also because she wanted to work on a Digital Humanities project. For her, “technology has become an important part of our lives, both as students and as academics. And anyone planning on working in academia needs to be able to use technology in their teaching and their own research.” Datskos has worked in the different stages of this project, from the digitalization of the editions to the proofreading the OCR’d versions of the scanned documents. Starting next year, she will be acting as project manager and she hopes that, with a growing team of students, they will be able to have all four editions of the work (German, Danish, British, American) fully digitized and searchable across editions.

By working in the Man Into Woman Project Datskos has learned a great deal about different aspects of Digital Humanities and has become particularly interested in digitization processes and accessibility. “I am most interested in the ways in which digitization allows us to produce a living, evolving document,” she shared. “For example, at the end of this project, we hope to be able to combine the 4 editions of Man Into Woman into one giant compilation to track how the different editions represent certain themes in the text. While this comparison can certainly be done with the print editions, making it digital not only makes the process faster but also more accessible and allows readers to look at a variety of aspects in the text altogether. And it is this accessibility that I think is the most productive element in the relationship between computing and the humanities”.

The Man Into Woman Project engaged Loyola students and faculty with experts on both sides of the Atlantic. Three external consultants have helped with the translation, transcription, and encoding processes and will continue to perform relevant duties in the future stages of the project. Dr. Sabine Meyer will serve as co-editor and translator for all German and Danish materials (except the Danish edition). She will also provide annotations for the scholarly edition, identifying historical figures and places and noting variants across the four editions. Dr. Nikolaus Wasmoen (University of Rochester) is currently the project manager for Modernist Networks, a federation of digital projects in modernism co-directed by Pamela Caughie and David Chinitz of Loyola University Chicago. He will serve as the digital technician and a co-editor for this edition. Dr. Marianne Ølholm (University of Copenhagen), an experienced translator, will translate the Danish edition into English, the first full-length translation of this work. Ølholm will also assist the co-editors in the collation of the Danish, German, and English-language editions.

The success of a DH project can been seen in its ability to attract new partners More Loyola Graduate students will be collaborating on this project in future stages. They will be working in the textual encoding process (TEI encoding), as well as working with a web designer to mount a testing version of the site with indexes, menus, transcription viewer, and initial search functionality provided via COLLEX. They will also develop advanced indexing and search capabilities to support multiple languages and interconnections among text, images, and annotations as well as test, update and maintain the website. Certainly, there is still much work to be done in this ambitious project, and the CTSDH is looking forward to continuing providing the necessary technological and technical resources for the further development of this amazing initiative.

Decolonizing the Museum Catalogue: Engaging Community and Expanding Access to the May Weber Ethnographic Study Collection

  Photograph of Mask from the May Weber Collection

In 2012, Loyola University Chicago received a collection of approximately 2500 cultural art objects to be curated by the Department of Anthropology from a Chicago-based collector and museum curator/director, May Weber. The May Weber Ethnographic Study Collection serves as an educational and research resource for students, faculty, and the public. The collection contains the work of hundreds of indigenous artists from communities in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. It is particularly strong in Mexican festival masks and Asian textiles, particularly from India and Southeast Asia. For students of anthropology, fine art & art history, history, or regional studies, the collection offers many routes of study, from folk art traditions to the ceremonial use of objects. Like most collections of its kind, the Weber Collection has been collected, curated, catalogued, and cared for under the guise of a Western scientific and aesthetic framework. LUC now serves as its permanent home, and we seek to leverage university resources to implement decolonial practices surrounding its perpetual care and use in order to engage with and make it accessible to the source communities represented in the collections.

Under the direction of Dr. Catherine Nichols, lecturer in the Department of Anthropology, the CTSDH is supporting the development of a collections management system using the open access program CollectiveAccess. This cataloguing interface provides robust and highly customizable descriptive fields, emphasizing visual accessibility. The initial phase of the project is the digitization of collection objects and associated documentation. Upon completion, we will implement phases rooted in decolonial methodologies, experimenting with affective lexicons, folk taxonomies, and source community-driven projects. 

Loyola Launches a Girls Who Code Chapter

The Center for Textual Studies & Digital Humanities (CTSDH) is proud to launch the first Girls Who Code chapter at Loyola University Chicago's Lakeshore campus starting this fall.

Girls Who Code is a national non-profit organization dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology. Tech jobs are among the fastest growing in the country, yet girls are being left behind. While interest in computer science ebbs over time, the biggest drop off happens between the ages of 13-17. Girls Who Code began in New York with 20 students; it now has chapters in all fifty states serving over 50,000 young women.

The Loyola chapter will offer free classes in coding to 6th - 12th grade students for a ten week period beginning in early October. Classes will be held on Saturday mornings from 10 am - 12 noon.

Interested in participating? Admission is free and registration is now open for our inaugural class. Spread the word to your neighbors, friends, schools and motivate more students to learn to code. You can also register for the Loyola chapter at www.girlswhocode/Clubs.

Important Links: 

Girls Admission Registration: https://goo.gl/forms/ndNNKyah0uVykoJw2

Volunteer Registration: https://goo.gl/forms/8eaKoZiTXZNKVgf42

Looking Back on Fall 2016 at CTSDH

Fall 2016 Recap

The fall semester was an exciting time at CTSDH. We launched new faculty, graduate, and undergraduate research projects, introduced a lunchtime lecture series, co-hosted a symposium, and made our Facebook Live debut. Check out ten things CTSDH did this semester, and we welcome you to join us for our spring events!

  1. We mixed and mingled. At the end of September we invited the graduate student community to come learn about what we do at CTSDH. We met with students from a range of academic disciplines—including English, History, Sociology, and Computer Science—ate pizza, drank wine, ran a 3D printer demo, and surveyed participants on what workshops we should hold
  2. We reflected on the history (and future) of Digital Humanities. With Paul Eggert of the English Department, CTSDH ran a one-day symposium called "Instant History: The Postwar Digital Humanities and Their Legacies" with featured panelists Geoffrey Rockwell, Steven Jones, Ted Underwood, and Laura Mandell.
  3. We explored digital archives of the Caribbean. Our first lunchtime lecture was by Elizabeth Hopwood, who spoke of "Building (and Breaking) The Early Caribbean Digital Archive." 
  4. We considered stories of women, leadership, and labor. In our second lunchtime lecture, Nancy Freeman, the director of the Women and Leadership Archives debuted an online exhibit on the fascinating story of Mollie West.
  5.  We learned about the role of text encoding in building digital critical archives. Our third lunchtime lecture featured Paul Eggert, whose talk was entitled "Extracting Oneself from the TEI: The Charles Harpur Critical Archive."
  6. We went live! If you missed them, catch our lunchtime lectures via Facebook
  7. We got social. Thanks to our MA Fellows Maria Palacio, Francis Flynn, and Aman Meghrajani, we launched our Facebook page, Flickr page, and Twitter account. 
  8. We created. CTSDH now has two maker-spaces on the third floor of Loyola Hall, including a text analytics lab and a 3D printing studio. We've made it even easier for visitors to use our space or check out equipment by providing a reservation form and inventory list on our site.
  9. We gamed. To wrap up the semester, we threw a party to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Nintendo Wii. Organized by Francis Flynn, the party was a chance to relax during finals, play some classic Wii games, discuss CodeName Revolution by Center founders Steven Jones and George Thiruvathukal, and reflect on the state of gaming since the Wii. 
  10. We gathered. Digital Humanities doesn't exist without its community of practitioners, scholars, researchers, learners, builders, tinkers, and dabblers, and we were very excited to see so many familiar and new faces this semester. Our Center aims to support the endeavors of the Loyola community, and we invite you to come talk to us about your ideas (find us on the third floor of Loyola Hall!)

 We hope you enjoyed this semester as much as we did and we hope to see you all for are next round of events in the Spring. 

Graduate Student Ice Cream Social

GraduateOpenHouse

image by PASSWORD66 (c) Creative Commons

New and returning graduate students are invited to learn more about the activities of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH) at our start-of-the-semester open house. Find out more about the work being done in Digital Humanities and Textual Studies. Tour the Center and discover our resources. Learn about current research projects and upcoming workshops and courses. Tell us what you would like to learn. Meet other graduate students with similar interests while enjoying ice cream at the end of your first week of classes!

Friday, September 1, 2:30-4 pm,

CTSDH, 3rd Floor, Loyola Hall, Room 318

RSVP on our Facebook page - www.facebook.com/LUCCTSDH (and like us while you are at it!)

Marianne Ølholm to Speak on "Translation Work"

Olholm

Leading scholar of avant-garde writing and postmodern literature, Marianne Ølholm (University of Copenhagen) will speak on “Translation Work” on Wednesday, September 6th at 4 pm in the CTSDH, Loyola Hall, 3rd floor.

Marianne Ølholm is the author of two books and ten articles on avant-garde writing and postmodern literature, including an article on “E-Poetry - Literary Experiments in the Digital Medium,” in Media and Materiality in the Neo-Avant-Garde (Frankfurt, Peter Lang 2012) and one on the reception of experimental American poetry in Denmark (2006). She has translated over a half dozen chapters in A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1950-1975, edited by Tania Ørum (Amsterdam and New York, Brill 2015) and more recently, Fra Mand til Kvinde (1931), the Danish first edition of what is more widely known as Man into Woman (1933), the life narrative of Lili Elbe, one of the first persons to undergo gender confirmation surgery.

Sponsored by the Departments of English and Modern Languages and Literatures, the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, and the Women’s Studies and Gender Studies Program.

A Weekend of Excellence for the CTSDH

A Weekend of Excellence for the CTSDH

We are proud to share the news that CTSDH Student Fellows won the Ignatian Spirit Award for best Loyola student employment‌ team at the 2017 Excellence Awards Ceremony. At the CTSDH, the Student Fellows enjoy working together to advance the goals of the Center and impact the Loyola Community. Stay tuned next Fall for more‌!

Along with the Ignatian Spirit Award, CTSDH Graduate Fellow Maria Palacio won the Best Mixed Method Presentation Paper Award for her paper, "Journalism in Times of War Critical Archive: a Digital Humanities Approach to Colombian Post-conflict." This paper was a part of Maria's capstone project that she has been working so hard to complete this semester. Maria is graduating with a Master's in Digital Humanities this semester. 

CTSDH Staff member takes 1st place at 1871 Hackathon

CTSDH Staff member takes 1st place at 1871 Hackathon

Over the weekend of April 1-2nd,CTSDH Graduate Fellow Neha Goel and her team won first place in the fourth annual Campus 1871. Campus 1871 is a startup hackathon for university students from Northwestern University, The Illinois Institute of Technology, The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, The University of Illinois at Chicago, The University of Illinois Springfield, DeVry University, DePaul University, The University of Chicago, and Loyola University Chicago.

The weekend event culminates in a competition where teams of “Hustlers” (business, marketing, and sales strategists), “Dreamers” (inventors and idea-makers), “Hipsters” (designers), and “Hackers” (developers) work together to create and pitch a business model for a start-up company. Teams are judged on the originality of their idea; the realistic potential of the business; the revenue plan; how well the idea is pitched; and overall design.

This year’s Campus 1871 gathered its largest cohort to date, 128 students from nine different universities.

Neha’s team developed a product and a mobile app entitled Respirare. Respirare is a sensor cap that clips onto asthma patients’ inhaler and syncs with a mobile app to track and record usage data. All of us at the CTSDH would like to offer congratulations to Neha and her team!

For more information click here! 

The Art of Adaptation One-Day Conference Storify Recap

The Art of Adaptation One-Day Conference

 

Missed the conference? Check out our Storify recap here

 

When? Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Where? Information Commons 4th Floor Lecture Hall Loyola University Chicago Lakeshore Campus 6501 N. Kenmore Avenue 

To see the program for the conference, click here

Verna Foster
Loyola University Chicago
‘Why Adapt? The Cultural Work of Dramatic Adaptation’
After surveying some of the cruxes in adaptation theory, including the relationship between text and performance in dramatic adaptation, this paper focuses on the cultural work performed by intrageneric dramatic adaptations with special reference to Mabou Mines Dollhouse, contemporary Medea plays, and Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’s An Octoroon.

Paul Eggert
Loyola University Chicago
‘Textual Criticism and the Curious Art of Adaptation: The Ned Kelly Story’
Replication and revision is a definition of Adaptation study. Textual criticism is the study of versions. Must these related pursuits continue to proceed in ignorance of one another? The paper addresses this question squarely, based on a case study of the versions and adaptations of the Ned Kelly outlaw-bushranger story-type.

Thomas Leitch
University of Delaware
‘Screening (Out) the American Short Story’
Although Hollywood has looked since its earliest days to novels and plays for properties that could be profitably adapted to the cinema, it has rarely drawn its source material from the American short story, despite the genre’s prominent status in American literature. This presentation investigates the reasons why.

Siobhan O’Flynn
University of Toronto
‘Media Fluid and Media Fluent: Adaptation as Experience Design’
In the digital world, multi- and trans-media elements, situations, and contexts deliberately invite audience participation in experiences allowing entry into the ‘storyworld,’ to co-create and extend content. Originating in the field of Human Computer Interaction, and now central to game design, marketing, and top-tier branded transmedia productions, experience design recognizes its media-fluent audience (i.e. people) as a medium.

Textual Criticism and Translating Classical Chinese Literature: Collating the Bilingual Edition of The Story of the Stone

Fan Shengyu, Senior Lecturer in School of Culture, History and Language at the Australian National University

When? Wednesday, April 12, 5:30 pm
Where? Mundelein Hall, Room 617

The most famous Chinese novel, The Story of the Stone (Hongloumeng), has a very long and complicated textual history. The currently existing editions could be divided into manuscripts and printed versions. The Chinese text on which David Hawkes and John Minford’s English translation (Penguin, 1973-1986) was based is totally different from any of the previous editions. The significance of collating texts in translating classical Chinese literature is worthy of attention from literary critics as well as translation scholars.

Dr. Fan Shengyu graduated from Beijing Normal University (2003), and is currently Senior Lecturer in School of Culture, History and Language at the Australian National University. He will be speaking through the kind invitation of Paul Eggert to his Textual Criticism class. Paul has generously welcomed all interested to attend the talk.

If you would like to attend, please shoot Dr. Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu) a quick email so we can have a head count.

 

 

Black Glitch in the Hour of Chaos

Black Glitch in the Hour of Chaos

 

When? Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 3pm

Where? Damen Student Center MPR

Who? Dr. Marisa Parham is a professor of English at Amherst College. She is also the director of the Five College Digital Humanities Project and a Faculty Diversity and Inclusion Officer.

What? This talk looks at rememory, affective excess, and glitch aesthetics in Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Hiro Murai’s video for Flying Lotus, Kendrick Lamar’s “Never Catch Me,” and Zun Lee’s digital project, “Fade Resistance.” How might we conceptualize “the digital” as a kind of mediation that articulates the time and space of diasporic experience?

Books, History, and the History of Books

Books, History, and the History of Books
 
Wednesday, March 29, 5:30 pm
Mundelein Hall, Room 617

Dr. Mussell's research focuses on nineteenth-century media. His first book, Science, Time and Space in the Late Nineteenth-Century Periodical (Ashgate, 2007) looked at the way the forms of nineteenth-century periodicals affected the content within their pages.  While this book was in press, he worked on the Nineteenth-Century Serials Edition (2008), a major edition of six periodicals and newspapers.  This work led to his second book, The Nineteenth-Century Press in the Digital Age (Palgrave, 2012), which considered how the digitization of the nineteenth-century press changes our understanding of both press and period.  In addition to running an AHRC research network and editing books and journal, he has been the editor of the Digital Forum in the Journal of Victorian Culture since 2009.

Dr. Mussell will be speaking through the kind invitation of Paul Eggert to his Textual Criticism class. Paul has generously welcomed all interested to attend the talk. If you would like to attend, please shoot Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu) a quick email so we can have a head count.

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017  Courses

 

Interested in learning more about the Digital Humanities? Check out one of our courses for the Fall 2017 semester. 

DIGH 400: Introduction to Digital Humanities Research
Dr. Kyle Roberts

Thursdays, 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm

This course is an introduction to the role of New Media and the Digital Humanities in the service of cultural heritage. It will focus on examining the ways that emerging media have affected our historical understanding in the past and present and on developing facilities with digital applications, methodologies, and platforms that scholars and public history professionals increasingly need to use in the present and future. This includes archiving, blogging, digitizing, digital storytelling, editing and analyzing, social media, virtual exhibitions and web design. It will also take up broad social and ethical questions surrounding media and contemporary culture, including accuracy of evidence, intellectual property, and open access to knowledge. By the end of the semester, students will have produced a digital portfolio of their work.
Cross-listed with HIST 479: Public History New Media

DIGH 500/595: Digital Humanities Project
Dr. Elizabeth Hopwood
Tuesdays, 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm

This capstone course will pull together the curriculum by requiring the student to work first on a Center research project (fall semester) and produce and publish online an innovative electronic project of their own design (spring semester). Depending on student interests and faculty expertise, options may range from writing a conventional research essay in digitally publishable form, to creating a sample electronic edition and writing a rationale to support it, to building and explaining a media database or digital tool that demonstrates important theoretical and practical points in digital humanities work. The student will be required in each case to specify real-world institutional contexts within which the work would make a contribution to the digital humanities.
The 6-hour course sequence is designed to be distributed over two consecutive semesters.

COMP 436: Markup Languages
Dr. Nicholas Hayward
Wednesdays, 4:15 pm - 6:45 pm

This course is concerned with XML and its various component frameworks. The core frameworks to be covered include Document Object Model (DOM), Simple API for XML processing (SAX), the XML Path language (XPath), and XSLT. A number of real-world XML languages will be explored: Math Markup Language (MathML), Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), and Ant Build Files (to name a few). The course concludes with a discussion of XML and Network Services (e.g. SOAP and XML/ RPC). Visiting speakers and affiliated researchers from various disciplines may help the class ‌contextualize the learning of markup languages, TEI/DocBook, as well as XML, XSLT, RDF, etc.

HIST 375-001: Digital History: History of Food
Dr. Elizabeth Hopwood
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

From the histories of sugar plantation slavery in the Caribbean cane fields, to President Lincoln's proclamation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday, to Quaker Oats' introduction of the Aunt Jemima character to sell pancake mix, to the more recent controversy surrounding the publication of the Thug Kitchen Cookbook in 2014, food has played a consistent yet complicated role in the shaping of national histories, social relations, and personal experiences and cultures.
In this course, students will examine the relationship between food and the textual histories of race, gender, and class in the Americas and the Caribbean from the early nineteenth century to the present.

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to leading theories and methods from the fields of food studies, history, textual studies, new media, and the digital humanities. Students will consider both the history of food writing and food writing history across a range of genres and media, such as newspapers, visual advertisements, cookbooks, novels, film and TV.

Students will also participate in the remixing and rewriting ('forking') of these histories through in-class discussion, archival research, and collaborative project building while also learning digital tools and methods including digital curation and exhibit building, and data analysis.

Patterns for Jazz Lunchtime Lecture Postponed to Fall 2017

Patterns for Jazz Lunchtime Lecture Postponed to Fall 2017

The lunchtime lecture scheduled for April 5th on Patterns for Jazz: A Pedagogical and Research Project to Reconstruct a Classic Text on Learning Jazz Improvisation with George Thirvathukal of Loyola University Chicago has been moved to the Fall 2017 semester. Apologies for the inconvenience! 

 

Video: "Old Media, Anthropology and the Digital Return"

This talk details how objects collected during ethnographic or anthropological research (in particular from North American  Indigenous communities) became scientific tools and sources of evidence in museums. Tuesday, February 7, 2017, 5pm IES 123/124 

This talk will introduce a media history of anthropology by looking at the technologies and visualization strategies that have been used to document and record material culture. By giving a history of these bureaucratic technologies (like collecting guides, ledger books, catalog cards and modern databases) it will contextualize how scientific objectivity came to stand in for originating communities’ perspectives and ideas about the world. Today, as museums and communities experiment with new technologies and visualizations (like 3D Scanning and printing) as well as new protocols and methods for collaborative mediation, an uneasy balance is struck between technological innovation and cultural history preservation. 

How do past infrastructures influence contemporary engagements with material culture for repatriation or digital return work? Do new visualizations of objects lead to new knowledges? Ultimately, this talk will argue that a historicized approach to understanding media technologies is integral to understanding the ways in which knowledge has been practiced and performed in ethnographic museums through time.

Migrating the New: Text and Document in Ulysses

The three-volume Ulysses: A Critical and Synoptic Edition presented to Stephen Joyce at the Frankfurt James Joyce Symposium in 1984 was a print output of a larger digital enterprise. Among the earliest editions to enlist the systematic aid of the computer in the storage and collation processes, the 1984 Ulysses (rev. 1986) represents a pioneering effort in digital scholarly editing. Its aim was nothing less than the reconstruction of ‘Ulysses as Joyce wrote it’.

Initially developed in tustep by the Munich team of Hans Walter Gabler with Wolfhard Steppe, Claus Melchior and others, successive migrations since the late 1990s have seen the edition’s diachronic information converted, in the first instance, to the tei P3 sgml standard and, since 2002, to the tei xml dtd (P4 and P5). My talk will report on ongoing efforts to migrate these legacy data to current encoding standards and to develop tools that leverage and visualize the diachronic information contained therein. Issues to be addressed include (a) the detection, measurement and reversal of so-called “migration loss”—degradation of genetic information over the course of several major conversions; (b) the commensurability of documentary editing with the inter-document alteration favored in Gabler’s synoptic presentation; and (c) the stakes of producing a tei P5 version of the Critical and Synoptic Edition with all the constraints imposed by a legacy version of tustep over now re-encoding the documents of Ulysses in composition and transmission.

Ronan Crowley is FWO Pegasus Marie Curie Fellow at the Centre for Manuscript Genetics, University of Antwerp, in Belgium. He received his PhD in English from the University at Buffalo in 2014 for a dissertation on transatlantic copyright regimes, genetic criticism and Irish modernism. From 2014–2016 he was Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Passau. He is the editor, with Dirk Van Hulle, of New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age (Brill Rodopi, 2016).

Happy Birthday Frederick Douglass! Celebration Recap

On February 14, the CTSDH co-sponsored a celebration of Frederick Douglass' birthday in honor of Black History Month. We kicked off the event with a live-streamed welcome by the Colored Conventions Project along with some dramatic readings of Douglass' work. After, we heard from Loyola speakers on the importance of Douglass and transcribing his texts.

Douglass Event

Seventy students, staff, and faculty attended the event. They transcribed many pages, ate many slices of pizza and cake, and learned a valuable lesson about the importance of collective action. There were eight other institutions holding simultaneous events today and the folks at the Colored Conventions Project out of the University of Delaware, organizer of the national event, provided an inspiring livestream that we watched while we were eating and transcribing.

Many thanks to those who stopped by and celebrated with us. We could not have had such a successful event without you!

Douglass Event
    Douglass Event

Why transcribe? The Colored Conventions Project works to “bring nineteenth-century Black organizing to digital life.” Post-1830, Black individuals gathered to strategize, discuss, and plan how to achieve greater civil rights. These works were often written down, but have since been forgotten about. By transcribing these documents, we are learning more about and giving credit to the individuals involved in this movement. We transcribe to educate ourselves and the world about the obstacles that Blacks are still working to overcome. Learn more about the Colored Conventions Project: http://coloredconventions.org/. Transcribing doesn't stop here! If you would like to join the efforts of the Colored Conventions Project, log on to their website and start transcribing. 

Douglass Event

Douglass Event

Sponsors: the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, African Studies and the African Diaspora, English Department, History Department, the Joseph A. Gagliano Chair in American Urban History, and the Loyola University Libraries.

 

"Old Media, Anthropology and the Digital Return" with Hannah Turner

"Old Media, Anthropology and the Digital Return" with Hannah Turner

 

This talk details how objects collected during ethnographic or anthropological research (in particular from North American  Indigenous communities) became scientific tools and sources of evidence in museums. Tuesday, February 7, 2017, 5pm IES 123/124 

This talk will introduce a media history of anthropology by looking at the technologies and visualization strategies that have been used to document and record material culture. By giving a history of these bureaucratic technologies (like collecting guides, ledger books, catalog cards and modern databases) it will contextualize how scientific objectivity came to stand in for originating communities’ perspectives and ideas about the world. Today, as museums and communities experiment with new technologies and visualizations (like 3D Scanning and printing) as well as new protocols and methods for collaborative mediation, an uneasy balance is struck between technological innovation and cultural history preservation. 

How do past infrastructures influence contemporary engagements with material culture for repatriation or digital return work? Do new visualizations of objects lead to new knowledges? Ultimately, this talk will argue that a historicized approach to understanding media technologies is integral to understanding the ways in which knowledge has been practiced and performed in ethnographic museums through time.

 

Cosponsored with the Department of Anthropology and the Public History Program

CTSDH Workshops: 3-D Printing

CTSDH Workshops: 3-D Printing

3-D Printing
Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 12:30-2:00 pm
Information Commons 120

On Wednesday, April 12th, the CTSDH will be hosting a workshop on 3-D Printing with Fred Barnhart, Associate Dean of the University Libraries.   

Curious? Come learn about a fascinating way to make 2-D digital designs into 3-D objects. No previous experience required (or even expected)!  

Please RSVP to Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu) so we have a sense of how many are coming.



Machine Learning at Loyola

Dligach_FacultySpotLight

CTSDH Graduate Fellow Aman Meghrajani recently caught up with Dmitriy Dligach, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, to learn more about his work on the topic of machine learning, an important field in the Digital Humanities. Prof. Dligach received his PhD in computer science from the University of Colorado Boulder, his MS in computer science from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and his BS in computer science from Loyola University Chicago. Prior to joining the faculty in computer science here at Loyola this year, Dr. Dligach was a researcher at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. 

What made you feel so passionate and motivated to study computer science in depth?

My interest was initially ignited when I realized that computer science gives its practitioners a power to build things. I decided to study computer science in-depth when I learned about artificial intelligence (AI) that focuses on building *intelligent* things.

For a novice student, machine learning might sound like a very broad and vague term. How would you define the term? What are some of the resources that can give a broader perspective on machine learning for new students in the field? Why might machine learning matter to students outside of computer science?

Machine learning is our best bet right now at building intelligent systems. Students interested in machine learning should consider enrolling a free online course such as the one offered by Coursera. Machine learning is likely to be of help to researchers in data-driven disciplines who are interested in deriving insights from large quantities of data automatically.

Where do you see machine learning going? How is it going to change our day-to-day activities? How is it going to impact human interactions and knowledge?

I like to say that machine learning is about predicting the future (you are typically given some historic data and the task is to predict what will happen when the computer is presented with future data). The more I work in this field the more I realize how hard this task is. Therefore, I will refrain from making predictions.

You've performed extensive research at Boston Children's Hospital & Harvard Medical School in deep semantic analysis and data mining. Data mining is well known in the software industry to help gain insights out of daily-generated raw data. What skill sets in data mining particularly helped you perform your research and what suggestions would you like to provide to Loyola students (business, computer science, biology, etc) who might be potentially interested in data mining careers?

To work in machine learning in general and data mining specifically, one needs training in calculus, linear algebra, statistics, and programming, although it is possible to succeed with a subset of these disciplines.

In the Spring 2017 semester, Dr. Dligach is teaching COMP 170: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming and COMP 398: Independent Study.

DH Undergraduate course for Spring, 2017: Technology, Text and Textuality (ENGL 310)

Technology, Text and Textuality

Plain text here for the website:
Advanced Writing (ENGL 310)
Technology, Text and Textuality
Section: 18W #5853
Instructor: E. Hopwood
3.0 credit hours Lecture
TR 2:30 – 3:45 PM LSC
Can you name a technological device that has drawn criticism for its tendency to captivate users? One that is used excessively and obsessively, to the extent that users, so entranced with their devices, walk into walls and ignore their companions? Today we might all knowingly shout, “the iPhone!” But in the nineteenth century, well before the invention of smart phones and tablets, another tool garnered similar negative response: the kaleidoscope. For Victorians, the kaleidoscope was both a technological innovation and cultural artifact that, much like the iPhone, was both admired and admonished in its historical moment. What’s the relationship between these, and other, tools of communication? What do they reveal about cultural formations, social interactions, and power relations? How has writing and communication been shaped through past and present technological innovations? This course situates students to critical understandings of how texts are made and mediated through technology, editing, and interface. Students will study the material and historical conditions of text—from manuscript and print to the digitized to born-digital—in order to understand the many “lives” that texts have lived. Students will practice modes of writing across new media and “old” mediums in order to draw connections between historical moments of print culture with those of contemporary technological advancement, considering, for instance, the many ways that technology has shaped the way we read and interpret (and, indeed, are ourselves read and interpreted).
This class will be structured with both discussion and hands-on activities where students can apply their scholarly interests to the tinkering, making, building, or experiencing of texts. Classes will be supplemented with experiential learning “labs” such as visits to archives or hands-on coding work. Assignments will include reading responses, “lab” write-ups of our fieldwork, and a final “Unessay” assignment. Students will gain an understanding of the principles involved in writing clear and effective prose in an emerging digital environment, across both scholarly and popular genres.

Extracting Oneself from TEI: The Charles Harpur Critical Archive Lunchtime Lecture

CTSDH Brownbags: Extracting Oneself from TEI: The Charles Harpur Critical Archive

Paul Eggert, Martin J. Svaglic Endowed Chair in Textual Studies, Department of English

Wednesday, November 16th, 12:30-1:30 pm

Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, 3rd Floor, Loyola Hall, Lakeshore Campus

The CHCA is a digital archive of, and will become a scholarly edition of, the poetic works of Charles Harpur (1813-1868), a Romantic celebrator of Australian landscape,  political satirist,  love poet and early environmentalist. Harpur and his works remain relevant today. But they are not easily accessible. 

This is because Harpur was a prolific poet and an inveterate reviser. Extant today in manuscript, and in colonial newspaper and other printed forms, are more than 2,700 versions of his 685 works in verse, as well as the often fascinating prose notes he wrote for them. Most of these versions have never been published.

An account of the development of this project will be given, concentrating on the measures taken and tools developed as we have gradually learned that there are simpler ways to do what is needed than the technology generally taken as the humanities standard, TEI encoding.

Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to kroberts2@luc.edu to help us with a headcount and to let us know if you have any dietary restrictions.

Spring 2017 DH Courses

Spring-2017 DH Courses

DIGH 402: DH Design

Thursdays, 7-9:30 pm, Prof. Elizabeth Hopwood

This course introduces students to Digital Humanities project design, management, and basic computer programming. It focuses on skills necessary for project development, such as design, planning, and implementation, by situating students to aspects of project design such as research questions and digital methods, critical codes studies, and interface design. Students will gain practical experience with coding, design, and version management with the final goal of publishing a collaborative working project. Students are given the opportunity to present and demonstrate their frameworks and project as part of the final course assessment. The practical experience is complemented by readings in instructional design and digital methods theory and practice.

COMP 417: Social, Ethical and Legal Issues in Computing

Thursdays, 4:15-6:45, Prof. Peter Dordal

 This course will explore a variety of ethical and legal issues facing those who use or program computers. Issues can be divided broadly into professional ethics, dealing with the ethical responsibilities of the programmer, and social issues, dealing with concerns we all have as citizens.

COMP 441: Human-Computer Interface Design

Thursdays, 7:00- 9:30 pm, Prof. Nicholas J Hayward

This course studies the interaction between humans and computer-based systems. The course will provide students with the methods for evaluating, designing, and developing better interfaces between humans and systems. Students will acquire an awareness of different design and evaluation methods as well as practical, effective, and cost-conscience methods for improving systems and their interfaces.

ENGL 413: Textual Criticism

Wednesdays, 7-9:30 pm, Prof. Paul Eggert

An introduction to major textual theories and their history. Topics may include such issues as analytic and descriptive bibliography, theories of copy-text, theoretical and practical issues in editing, and forms of textuality, including manuscript, print and digital.

HIST 361: Creation of the American Republic, 1763-1801

Thursdays, 4:15-6:45 pm, Prof. Kyle Roberts

The theme of the course this spring will be: “The American Revolution: The Revolution Will be Digitized!” When British colonists in North America declared themselves independent from the British Crown in 1776, they affected the most successful revolution in modern history. To this day, historians continue to try to make sense of their actions. In this hands-on, project-based course we will use digital tools and sources to conduct research on primary sources, analyze and interpret our findings, and communicate our results. The course will be taught simultaneously with Prof. Benjamin Bankhurst’s class at Shepherd University. Loyola students will participate in lectures and group projects with Shepherd students in this digital history innovative class.

Eat, Post, and Fork History.

An introduction to the course “Digital History: Foodways and the Forking of History”

Digital History: Foodways and the Forking of History

Source: NYPL Labs Project “What’s on the menu?” Oak Room Restaurant Menu, The Plaza Hotel, USA November 15, 1958

Taught by Professor Elizabeth Hopwood, the newest member of the CTSDH faculty, the course Digital History: Foodways and the Forking of History (HIST 300-01W) analyzes the role of food in shaping national histories and cultural experiences, while exploring new ways to write and rewrite history by using digital media. This course focuses on the study of foodways in North America and the Caribbean from the nineteenth century to the present. During the fall semester, Hopwood’s students are exploring topics as diverse as the theoretical underpinnings of food studies, the relationship between Halloween and candy throughout history, and the relationship between sugar production and slavery in the Caribbean.

This course asks undergraduates to reflect on how we write history, what history means, and how media affects our understanding of both. “One of the goals of this course,” Dr. Hopwood explains, “is to think about how food writes history, and through what texts (recipes, cookbooks, advertisements, novels, slave narratives), so it is equally important that we consider our own engagement with text, medium, and genre. I want my students to think carefully and critically about what it means to write across new media: what are the affordances of composing in both public and private spaces, and in working across genres?” Thus, students are using digital tools like Omeka and Netline to curate their own digital collections and exhibits of materials related to foodways: the history of a single ingredient, foodways, gender, food transportation, and commercialization. Omeka provides students with a platform to create an online repository of historic images like cookbooks, or letters, and illustrations while Netline allows the to map those images across time and space.

Students are also venturing into the production of histories through social media, such as blogging and Instagram. “Consider this: an Instagram Activity” is one of the course’s weekly activities. This activity, inspired by David Foster Wallace’s article “Consider the Lobster”, encourages students to consider, and historically re-consider, everyday foodways by using Instagram. Students must take pictures of everyday occurrences that make them reflect on the course’s topics and share them with their classmates, accompanied by a caption that contextualizes and problematizes their images. “So far I've seen posts (paired with beautiful images) that ponder the branding and advertising of boutique coffee shops, the ethics of honey, and the rhetoric of food packaging during a late-night snack,” Dr. Hopwood reflects. "My hope, as I've told them, is that they exercise and practice their ‘critical foodways lens’ outside of class (even if that means being up against our weekly deadline, out of ideas, and trying to think, 'okay, what analysis can I make of this slice of pizza in front of me?').”  

For Hopwood, this Digital History course comes out of the work for her current book project, based on her doctoral dissertation at Northeastern University, Eating the Atlantic: Nineteenth-Century U.S. and Caribbean Literature and the Gastroaesthetic. In her book, she explores how foodways - in particular, stories of labor, production, and consumption - formed cultural values and aesthetic judgments.  Drawing on texts such as The History of Mary Prince: A West Indian Slave, and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, she argues that eating was central to the formation of nineteenth-century cultural and national imaginaries across the Atlantic. She makes an important contribution to the burgeoning field of Atlantic World studies by showing that cultures of taste are developed not only by the consumer of the food, but also by the labor that was required to produced it. Enslaved Africans are just as important as white middle-class female cookbook authors in shaping taste-making in the nineteenth century.

The time has never been riper for this course. It comes when there has been a great proliferation of “food-related blogs, news articles, cooking shows, Instagram accounts, and other such writing!” Hopwood explains. “I think we're in an exciting moment where the aesthetics of food are being celebrated, discussed, and dismantled in public spaces alongside the work that food scholars are doing to think about the historical, sociological, and political implications of what we eat.” This course invites students to join the actual conversation on foodways in the classroom and outside of it, and to critically think about what they have on their plates. However, this course also invites them to learn and explore how the interest in food as a shaper of cultures and histories is not new and how “there's long been a fascination with what food might reveal about our sense of self and our ability to articulate (and perform) a sense of taste.” Definitely, throughout the semester, Hopwood’s students will taste the past, reflect on present foodways, and contribute to the forking of history.  

In the spring semester, Prof. Hopwood will be teaching an advanced undergraduate course on writing for new media and a graduate seminar on digital humanities design. Check back on the website later in the semester for more information.

CTSDH Seeks Freelance Web Developer for New Project

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

Gerard Manley Hopkins Official Website

August 2016

 

About:

Francis Fennell, Professor of English Emeritus, and the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH) at Loyola University Chicago solicit proposals for the development of a website and accompanying social media feeds (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) dedicated to the life and work of the English poet Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. (1844-1889). 

 

Goals:

The goals of this project are to create a site that:

  • facilitates discovery and conversation about the life and poetry of Hopkins;
  • provides a platform for hosting existing content and linking to external websites
  • creates and integrates a range of social media feeds (Facebook, Twitter) dedicated to disseminating information and fostering discussion about Hopkins;
  • is easily found via web search engines and is accessible to lay and specialist audiences;
  • and can be administered by CTSDH-affiliated faculty, staff and interns after the development phase comes to an end.

 

Specifications:

We are looking for someone with familiarity and experience with web design and development for this project.  The site should be developed in a LAMP stack content management system, such as Drupal or WordPress, which can be supported by one of Loyola University Chicago’s servers.

 

This position will develop a platform to support, ingest, and display:

  • Multi-media content:about the life and work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, such as .jpeg, html, pdf, including:
    • Image Gallery and metadata for photographs: of the poet, close friends, scenes related to his life and poetry.
    • Internal content (html/XML) as well as ability to link externally to other online versions and platforms of Hopkins’s
    • Audio Recordings: ability to support audio files
    • User Community: “Ask a Scholar”: a monitored chat room or forum designed for students to ask Hopkins scholars time-sensitive questions about the poet and his work.
    • Store: an e-commerce component that facilitates the purchase Hopkins books, CDs, t-shirts, sweatshirts, coffee mugs, etc.
    • Blog or Bulletin Board: with new book releases, calls for conference papers and special issues of journals, updates on scholarly projects, etc.
    • Development of and integration of external social media feeds, including Facebook and Twitter

 

Qualifications:

  • Ability to work with project team to review current content, develop workflow for future project interns, staff, and administrators
  • Excellent oral and written skills to communicate across technical and non-technical team members
  • Significant experience with front-end development and knowledge of web development standards
  • Ability to take initiative and work successfully in a collaborative environment

 

Submit:

Interested designers are requested to submit:

 

  • A detailed proposal for the design and implementation of the website with an estimated timeline for completion. The proposal should identify what needs to be created as part of the architecture of the website as well as the content generation and administrative needs of the site after the completion of the project. Plans for testing and evaluating the site should also be included.
  • A CV and a short statement of the designers’ experience with web and social media design, including examples of sites designed; aptitude with social media; and proficiency in different web platforms.  If the designer is not Chicago-based, a statement of any perceived challenges in working from a distance is appreciated. 

 

Budget:  $12,000 

 

Timeline: Proposals requested by 31 August 2016. Work ideally to begin by early September 2016. Work ideally completed by January 2017 so that the site can be tested over the spring semester.

 

Questions: Please direct any questions about content of the site to Prof. Francis Fennell (ffennel@luc.edu) and about technical concerns and requirement to Prof. Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities

Loyola Hall ▪ Loyola University Chicago ▪ Chicago, IL 60660

luctsdh@luc.edu

 

2016 Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities Coming Soon!

Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities & Computer Science “New Directions”

November 12-13, 2016

University of Illinois at Chicago (USA)

The Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS) brings together researchers and scholars in the humanities and computer science to examine the current state of digital humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research.

The 2016 theme is “New Directions,” and will feature research broadly related to Digital Humanities and Computer Science work applied to humanistic research, with a particular focus on new trends in publishing, mapping, health humanities, digital archives, visualization and visualization tools, gaming, workflows, theories, and methodologies.

Keynote – Saturday, November 12th

Geoffrey Rockwell

Professor of Philosophy and Humanities Computing & Director of the Kule Institute for Advanced Study, University of Alberta

Geoffrey Rockwell works in the area of philosophical dialogue, textual visualization and analysis, humanities computing, instructional technology, computer games and multimedia. Co-investigator in the Text Mining the Novel SSHRC Partnership, he collaborates with Stéfan Sinclair on a hybrid manuscript Hermeneutica and tool Voyant project and is the co-lead of the TAPoR project documenting text tools for humanists.

Sponsored by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), DePaul University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Chicago Questions? Contact us at dhcs@helpdesk.uic.eduConference Website Follow us on Twitter!

Your Place to Learn about the Digital Humanities and Textual Studies

We are a broadly multidisciplinary research center that offers support for the development, peer review, hosting, and online publication of digital research projects of all kinds. We offer a professional Interdisciplinary MA in Digital Humanities and sponsor events throughout the academic year.

Undergraduate DH Courses, Fall 2016

COMP 111: History of Computing
Instructor: Robert Yacobellis
Information Commons:230 (Lake Shore) Tuesday, Thursday 01:00PM-02:15

This course will provide a venue for students to learn about history through the evolution of number systems and arithmetic, calculating and computing machines, and advanced communication technology via the Internet. Students who take this course will attain a degree of technological literacy while studying core historical concepts. Students who complete this course will learn the key vocabulary of the computing discipline, which is playing a significant role in modern human though and new media communications. The History of Computing will be organized around the historical perspective. The relationships between social organization, intellectual climate, and technology will be examined and stressed.

COMM 280:Evolution in Communication Technology
Instructor: Meghan Dougherty
T/R 230-345p SOC 015

Communication technologies shape our experience of language, reality, time, memory and knowledge. Learn how the telegraph, telephone, radio, tv, computers and social media embody the assumptions of those who build and use them, and the complex relationships that arise between people and their tools.

HIST 300: Digital History: Foodways and the Forking of History
Instructor: Elizabeth Hopwood
MW 6-7:15 pm

From the histories of sugar plantation slavery in the Caribbean cane fields, to President Lincoln’s proclamation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday, to Quaker Oats’ introduction of the Aunt Jemima character to sell pancake mix, to Upton Sinclair’s unsettling novelistic portrayal of Chicago’s meatpacking industry, to the more recent controversy surrounding the publication of the Thug Kitchen Cookbook in 2014, food has played a consistent yet complicated role in the shaping of national histories, social relations, and personal experience. In this course, students will examine the relationship between food and the textual histories of race, gender, and class in North America and the Caribbean from pre-national era to the present. This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to leading theories and methods from the fields of food studies, history, textual studies, new media, and the digital humanities. Students will consider both the history of food writing and food writing history across a range of genres and medias, such as newspapers, visual advertisements, cookbooks, novels, film and TV. Students will also participate in the remixing and rewriting (“forking”) of these histories through in-class discussion, archival research, and collaborative project building while also learning digital tools and methods including xml markup, digital curation and exhibit building, and data analysis. 

Interview with Alexandra Runnion, undergraduate research fellow at SIMLab

This summer, Loyola School of Communication undergraduate research assistant Alexandra Runnion explores the growing field of biometric identity technologies, and their broader implication on our modern lives. Alexandra works at Loyola’s SIMLab under the supervision of Dr. Florence Chee. For her project, she looks at the way technology companies and our governments gather this kind of data, and how these datasets are then used. She seeks to elaborate on the use, usefulness and possible dangers of the rise of biometrics in the modern world of identity technologies.

The CTSDH’s summer fellow Sebastian Wuepper sat down with her to talk about her project.

You work at SIMLab, can you please explain what SIMLab is, and what you are doing there?

The SIMLab or Social Interaction and Media Lab is a research lab with Loyola university Chicago’s School of Communication. The lab is headed by Dr. Florence Chee who guides students through research projects while working on her own. Although the lab is a recent addition to the School of Communication, we have plans to connect with other labs in Chicago and the world to expand the research community.

My first brush with the lab came during an introductory SoC seminar last fall. Dr. Chee spoke with us about the Lab and I was immediately interested. After reaching out to Dr. Chee I began going to regular meetings and then developed the current SIMLab logos. In the spring of this year my role in the lab branched off into o research as I developed an abstract for the Provost Fellowship. 

How did your work at SIMLab get you interested in this project?

My initial role in the SIMLab was the creation of logos and promotional material for upcoming events. As I spent more time with Dr. Chee and the students working on projects for her, I grew more interested in what Dr. Chee calls “research culture”. There are so many fascinating challenges and questions in our digital age. I wanted to join the conversation. In the spring with my Provost Fellowship Award, I received the chance to add my voice to the discussion.

What got you interested in working on a project on biometrics?

As the Provost deadline loomed, Dr. Chee and I met several times to bounce ideas off each other. One day we were discussing advertising in gaming when almost out of nowhere the topic of biometrics was brought up by her. She began talking about all of the new technologies being developed and how these technologies were slowly being implemented into our everyday lives. This topic stuck with us because of its vast implications. Since it is so new, there are so many questions about how it will be used in years to come.

What is your stance on biometrics in everyday life? Do you, for example, use a fingerprint scanner to unlock your phone?

I loved having an iPhone 5s complete with fingerprint scanner. It was so easy to just touch your phone without even looking. Unfortunately, I broke my phone and downgraded to the 5c. I get annoyed every time my phone buzzes to tell me I mistyped a digit in my passcode.

However, there are times when fingerprint data has given me pause. For example, this summer I am interning for a Wealth Management company. In order to have a work email and server access, I needed to have my fingerprints collected and on file. I understood that I had to do this because I was interning for a company dealing with finances. What interested me was how these fingerprint tests were conducted. I had a few options of places to take the prints. When I had them taken I was not at a police station so I asked the proprietor where the print were going. She said they went to a “third party” and then to the FBI. I think this example illustrates what I want to delve into with my research.  

What do you hope the outcome of your project to be?

I hope to illuminate possible unethical practices in biometrics, particularly fingerprint data.

What do you think about collecting biometric data for traveling purposes? The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that collects fingerprints from all who enter. Do you think that is a good thing?

I think that proper identification during travel is crucial. Biometric data provides the highest security because it directly identifies the individual traveling. Biometrics replaces passport and IDs which can be falsified. There are not many ways to falsify biometric data.

What is the most surprising discovery of this project so far? What do you find the most challenging?

In my early stages of research, I have have been reading up on what is called “big data”. One article discusses how the US government is constantly collecting huge amounts of data via surveillance around the world and here [in the US]. The paper called this massive amount of information “big data”. The government keeps all of this data on file because they do not know when or if something will be useful until it is useful. In order to store all of this data the government will use third party companies to store it for them. This relates to my own experience of having my fingerprints taken. The government cannot provide all of the room to house such large amounts of data so they turn to others to fill in the gaps. Its transactions like these that I am interested in researching.

Where do you see the biggest problems arising from massive creation of biometrical data from a large part of the population?

Most people would not mind the government watching and storing data on them. When I asked my mother about how she felt about her biometric data being stored, she said that she’s not a criminal and does not plan on being one so she doesn’t mind the government watching or taking biometric data. What I did not know and what surprised me was that it is not just the government [that collects] this kind of information. The third party technology that scanned my fingerprints also has my social security number. This is where I see potential issues in the mass creation of biometric data. I want to know how these third party organizations with access to people’s biometric data and sensitive information like social securities work.

Alexandra's project will be published on the online presence of SIMLab Chicago - The Social & Interactive Media Lab of Loyola University Chicago's School of Communication.

The Priest and the Punched Cards

Steven Jones Interview

Chief Operator Betsy Stewart at the control console of the IBM SSEC, IBM World Headquarters, 590 Madison Avenue, New York, 1948. [IBM Archives]

Founding co-director of Loyola’s Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities Steve Jones recently published Roberto Busa, S.J., and the Emergence of Humanities Computing: The Priest and the Punched Cards (Routledge, 2016). In this groundbreaking book, Jones re-evaluates the origins of humanities computing, specifically the role Father Busa played in establishing computing based textual analysis. Researching in archives on two continents, Jones uncovers a fascinating story at the intersection of religion, technology, and human endeavor. DH scholars have heralded the book, calling it “a work of scholarship that is as lively and atmospheric (and compelling) as a novel." CTSDH Summer Fellow and Loyola PhD student Sebastian Wuepper recently caught up with Jones to talk to him about the book ...

Your previous book, The Emergence of the Digital Humanities, examined a profound shift in our collective understanding of the digital network over the past decade. Why did you chose to follow it with this book on Roberto Busa, S.J.?

The 2014 book was about the contexts for the new digital humanities that emerged about 2004–2008. It looked at the connections between changes in technology (and cultural perceptions of technology) and the rise of this new interdisciplinary formation—complete with programs, funding, venues for publication, and new research methods and forms of pedagogy. DH, as it has been called, didn’t emerge in a vacuum, but in the context of specific technologies, platforms, and cultural developments. I thought the same would hold for what was repeatedly cited as the origin story or founding myth of humanities computing, the collaboration between Father Roberto Busa, an Italian Jesuit, and IBM, a project aimed at using the company’s punched-card data-processing machines to produce a massive concordance to the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, starting in 1949. In other words, I applied the same approach I had taken in the previous book, but to the earlier era, that mid-century moment of data processing. I say in the book that it’s not a biography of Father Busa, but it is a kind of biography of his research project in its first decade, 1949–1959. I set out to complicate that founding myth with some history. I started by exploring the technology platforms involved, to begin with, punched-card machinery, which was technically not yet computing but was a form of data processing. Busa was among the first to apply these kinds of machines to the study of natural language.

Is it surprising to you that a Jesuit scholar served as a founding father of humanities computing?

As I say, this was taken for granted by many scholars working in digital humanities—and “founding father” is of course the right term, in more than one sense. But in recent years, people have pointed out that there are other possible origin stories for DH, alternative genealogies—starting in media and film studies, for example, or in speculative and experimental work in writing and theory, and often running though what would later be called “alt-ac” or alternative academic work, in labs and libraries, workshops and media centers. Some of these alternative genealogies challenge the centrality of Father Busa and IBM, and rightly so. I wanted to complicate that story and restore its human dimensions in part in order to situate it as one among various alternative histories of humanities computing and digital humanities. But to get back to your question: it’s not at all surprising that Busa’s Jesuit training and calling would have prepared him to undertake such an international, interdisciplinary, heavily networked project at the boundary of science and technology and the humanities. As I understand it. that’s in keeping with Jesuit history and culture, going back centuries.

What were the most significant challenges in working on this project?

One issue is how recent and yet elusive this history is. Father Busa died in 2011, and some of his papers and archives continue to be accessioned and processed at his home institution at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan. Thanks to Dr. Marco Passarotti, the correspondence and other documents (and, by the way, about 1000 fascinating professional-quality photographs, some of which I have on view at the book’s website) have been made available to scholars in recent years. But much remains unprocessed. When I was working there last year, a Jesuit showed up at the Center one morning to donate a bundle of Busa’s papers—literally wrapped in brown paper and tied with string—containing some new letters and other documents! There’s clearly a lot more out there. Also, 1949 is, on the one hand, recent history, but on the other hand, it’s just long ago enough that many of the people involved—including Father Busa himself—are no longer with us. And not just people. Last year I was able to visit the building outside Milan in which Busa started the first humanities computing center, what he called the Center for Literary Data Processing. Since then, alas, it has been demolished.

What was the biggest surprise?

One realization (not exactly a surprise, given the culture of early computing) was how dependent Busa’s research center was on scores of young women who were trained as skilled operators of the punched-card machinery. Some of these women are still around and colleagues in London have been identifying and interviewing them about their experiences for eventual publication. I was fortunate enough to benefit from those transcripts in progress as I wrote the book.

There were many specific historical and biographical surprises. For example, I learned from the letters that Father Busa suffered what he called a “nervous breakdown” in 1959 as a result of his intense schedule and work on the newly discovered Dead Sea Scrolls. In fact, like most people, I suspect, I had been unaware of that second major project—applying the techniques of literary data processing to the study of the scrolls—in part because it was halted in the 1960s and never resulted in publication. The punched cards and magnetic tapes and facsimiles of some of the scrolls are still there in metal file cabinets in Milan and I was able to examine them. At around the same time, at the height of the Cold War, Father Busa himself brokered a deal between an IBM-sponsored linguistics lab at Georgetown University and the new European Atomic Energy Community at Ispra, Italy, where they were working on machine translation of Russian texts. So, the first humanities computing center received some funding directly from this Cold War project. In general, humanities computing was more than an academic practice. It emerged in the contexts of the postwar period and the Cold War, as well as the material contexts of those punched-card machines and early room-sized computers. The detailed history is much messier—and much more interesting—than the founding myth.

A copy of the introduction to the book is available for reading here. To see rare images of Busa and the technology he employed, visit Jones’ Tumblr for the book.

Michelangelo Zaccarello to Speak on February 22nd

Zaccarello

On Monday, February 22, at 5pm in Mundelein 508, Dr Michelangelo Zaccarello of the University of Verona will be speaking to graduate students in Paul Eggert’s textual studies class.  

Dr Zaccarello has specialized in Italian Medieval and Renaissance authors, originally Tasso, Pulci and Burchiello but more recently Boccaccio and Dante, especially from a linguistic standpoint. His interests extend to textual criticism, editorial theory, material philology and stemmatics. He has published critical editions of Burchiello and Franco Sacchetti.

His topic will be: "Visual Errors Old and New (the Unbearable Lightness of Seeing).”

Colleagues and grad students will be very welcome to attend.

Caughie and Chinitz Launch ModNets

ModNets

Drs. Pamela Caughie and David Chinitz are pleased to announce the launch of Modernist Networks. A federation of digital projects in the field of modernist literary and cultural studies, “ModNets” provides a vetting community for digital modernist scholarship and a technological infrastructure to support access to scholarship on modernist literature and culture. 

Newly launched at the Modernist Studies Association conference in November 2015, ModNets is now actively seeking digital projects. Years in the making, ModNets has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Deans of the College, the University Libraries, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, and the English Department. 

Woolf Online Project

Woolf Online project

The National Endowment for the Humanities Editions Program awarded a two-year, $175,000 grant to Loyola University for the Woolf Online Project to mount a knowledge site for Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse. The project extends the pilot project focused on the "Time Passes" section of the novel, begun by the late Julia Briggs and completed at De Montfort University's Centre for Textual Scholarship in 2008. (See http://www.WoolfOnline.com.) The new project, based at the CTSDH, is under the direction of Professors Pamela Caughie and Peter Shillingsburg at Loyola University Chicago with the assistance of Professor Mark Hussey at Pace University. The technical team consists of Professor George Thiruvathukal and Dr. Nicholas Hayward at Loyola.

Digital Humanities Across the University this Fall

DH Fall 2015

On September 9th, the School of Communication and visiting media artist Philip Mallory Jones will unveil an interactive virtual world exhibit highlighting the Chicago neighborhood of Bronzeville.

Time Machine: Bronzeville and The Chicago Renaissance explores the history, lore, and legends of Bronzeville during the defining events of the 20th century: The Great Migration, The Great Depression, Jim Crow Segregation, World War II, and the emergence of the Black Metropolis.

Dateline: Bronzeville is a mystery adventure computer game where the player acts as Runny Walker, a seasoned photojournalist and columnist for the Chicago Advocate. Bronzeville serves as the news beat for the player, where the weekly column covers the spectrum of social, political, cultural, sport, entertainment, and community events in the area.

Members of the CTSDH community are invited to enjoy drinks and appetizers while hearing from the artist, touring the exhibit, and trying your hand at navigating Bronzeville in the 40s and 50s at a reception on September 9th at 5:30 pm at the School of Communication, 51 E. Pearson Street, Water Tower Campus.  To register, click here. 

On November 12, a new exhibition, Simplexity: Data Visualization in the Age of Information, curated by Kelli Evans will open in the Ralph Arnold Gallery on the Lakeshore Campus.

Access to prolific amounts of quickly and widely distributed information is a key component of daily life across much of the globe. Unfortunately, our ability to generate information can rapidly overwhelm our capacity to understand it. One of the greatest challenges of the information age involves finding patterns and making meaningful connections from this mountain of data. Data visualization, also known as infographics, is a powerful means of achieving this end. It allows the viewer to access and understand complex information in the form of clear and concise visual representation. Data visualization is a field that combines graphic design with many other disciplines: data analysis, statistical graphics, visual perception, information architecture, and the like. We access and utilize infographics every day without giving much thought to their ubiquity. They can range from the mundane, such as route maps for transit systems, to the more esoteric, such as the depiction of interactions among proteins in a human cell. In 2003, Philippe Compain defined simplexity as “…the combination of simplicity and complexity within the context of a dynamic relationship between means and ends.” This word and concept clearly describes the relationship between our need to understand the deluge of information we encounter everyday with data visualization, the means to do so.

The exhibition runs from November 12, 2015 – January 23, 2016. There is a free opening reception on November 12 from 5-6:30 pm. No registration required.

 

Marie Hicks Lecture on Nov. 12

HicksLecture

The CTSDH will host a lecture by historian Marie Hicks (IIT), Thursday Nov. 12, 3:00-5:00 PM, 318 Loyola Hall, Lake Shore Campus: "Women Computer Operators' Effects on the British State: A History of Gender and Digital Labor." Co-sponsored by Loyola's Women Studies and Gender Studies program. Free and open to the public.

Hicks is a historian of technology, gender, and modern Europe, specializing in the history of computing. Her recent work focuses on labor and technological change in Britain, and on investigating how 20th century efforts to computerize changed gendered and classed expectations associated with machine work. Her work studies how collective understandings of social progress are defined by competing discourses of national prestige, labor, and productivity, and how technologies play a formative role in this process. She is currently completing a book, Compiling Inequalities: Gender, Technocracy, and the Computerization of Britain, 1930-1979, that investigates how the falling percentage of women computer operators and programmers injured efforts to computerize British government and industry, and ultimately hindered that nation's global political and technological aspirations.

Day conference: Versions, Versioning, and Versionality

Day conference: Versions

Versions, Versioning, and Versionality
Saturday, October 31, 2015
Information Commons, 4th Floor
Lake Shore Campus, Loyola University Chicago
8:30 a.m. –5:00 p.m.

This day-conference is about versions as things, versions as implemented editorially or in performance or for particular audiences (versioning), and leads on to theoretical reflection upon the condition of versionality. There will be four plenary papers, each followed by a round-table response reflecting on their possible extensions or implications.

Michael Anesko
Penn State University
The Textual Condition of Henry James’s The Ambassadors: A Revised Scenario

Robin Schulze
University of Delaware
When is a Version Not a Version? Printing Marianne Moore

Joseph Janangelo
Loyola University Chicago
Serving the Material: Remastering Maria Callas and Completing Judy Garland

Suzanne Gossett
Loyola University Chicago
What Do We Mean by “Versions” of Shakespeare’s Plays?

For more information, contact Prof. Paul Eggert at peggert@luc.edu
Presented by the Martin J. Svaglic Endowed Chair in Textual Studies and the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities

DH2015, Sydney, Australia

DH2015, Sydney Australia

Sydney skyline, approached from the Harbor.

DH 2015, the Global Digital Humanities conference was held June 30-July 4, in Sydney, Australia. The program was richly populated with excellent papers, panel discussions, and posters on current work in the field, a good deal of it community-based, outward-facing, politically and socially engaged. Keynotes by Intel's Genevieve Bell, on robots, and Tim Sheratt, "Unremembering the Forgotten," stood out in particular. CTSDH Director Steven Jones presented a paper on his forthcoming book, Roberto Busa, S.J., and The Emergence of Humanities Computing: The Priest and the Punched Cards.

Recent DH graduate Hannah Gillow Kloster takes position at University of Bergen Library

Recent DH graduate Hannah Gillow Kloster takes position at University of Bergen Library

Recent graduate of the MA program in Digital Humanities Hannah Gillow Kloster has taken a position as archivist at the Queer Archive at the University of Bergen Library, Norway. The job will entail cataloging and digitizing Norwegian gay activist Kim Friele's personal archive and register. In addition, Kloster will expand and improve the Archive's existing website. Over the long term, the Queer Archive will become a combined digital and physical resource with responsibility for finding, archiving, and disseminating source materials on queer history in Norway. 

Recent DH graduate Caitlin Pollock takes position at IUPUI

Recent DH graduate Caitlin Pollock takes position at IUPUI

2014 Graduate of the MA program in Digital Humanities, Caitlin Pollock, has taken a position starting August 2014 as a Humanities Librarian at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) in the library's Center for Digital Scholarship. She’ll serve as subject specialist to Philosophy, Africana Studies, and Classics. While the job involves traditional librarianship to a degree, including collection development and research instruction, Pollock’s main duties will be working with IUPUI's Arts and Humanities Institute and the Center of Digital Scholarship to develop new Digital Humanities initiatives and programming at the library and the university at large.

 

Day of DH 2014

Day of DH 2014

Tuesday, April 8, 2014, is the annual Day of DH (Digital Humanities). According to the official website for this year, Day of DH is an open community publication project that brings together scholars interested in the digital humanities from around the world to document what they do on one day, April 8th, answering the question, "Just what do digital humanists really do?" Several members of the Loyola DH community will be participating in this year's event. 

Day Conference: "Textual Conditions: Lawrence, Conrad, and Woolf"

Day Conference: "Textual Conditions: Lawrence, Conrad, and Woolf"

A day conference, "Textual Conditions: Lawrence, Conrad, and Woolf," will be held Saturday, March 29, 2014, 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM, on Loyola's Lake Shore Campus (Cuneo Room 2), sponsored by the CTSDH and the Martin J. Svaglic Chair of Textual Studies. Speakers will include Alexandre Fachard (University of Lausanne and University of Geneva), Paul Eggert (University of New South Wales), Joyce Wexler (Loyola University Chicago), and Peter Shillingsburg (Loyola University Chicago). Reception and registration begins at 9:30 and lunch will be provided. (Full program schedule.) 

DH Graduate Trevor Borg

DH Graduate Trevor Borg

Trevor Borg, a 2013 graduate of the MA program in Digital Humanities, began working as a software engineer for the social media analytics and advertising firm 4C in the fall of 2012. As a front-end developer, Trevor works on a single page web application geared toward effective ad buying on Twitter, handling everything from markup and design to API integration using cutting edge web technologies, from 4C's Seattle office.

A new paper based on Trevor’s MA project at Loyola, “Single Page Apps for Humanists: A Case Study using the Perseus Richmond Times Corpus,” co-authored with George Thiruvathukal, has been accepted for the program of the Digital Humanities 2014 conference in Lausanne, Switzerland this summer.

 

Modernist Networks Workshop

modnets workshop

Modernist Networks metadata workshop, 8-17-2013

Modernist Networks (ModNets), the federation of digital projects in modernist literary and cultural studies directed by Pamela Caughie and David Chinitz of Loyola’s English Department, held a workshop at the CTSDH on August 17, 2013, supported by an NEH Startup Grant, to discuss the metadata issues essential to aggregating digital modernist projects. Project managers, metadata analysts, and representatives of both ModNets and its umbrella organization, ARC, came from as far as Belgium, Nova Scotia, Texas, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, and even Australia to attend. By generating sample metadata documents derived from existing projects, the group identified relevant issues in the current ARC metadata standard and mapped its next steps in developing a functional ModNets infrastructure.

Peter Shillingsburg retires

Peter Shillingsburg retires

The CTSDH bids farewell to Peter Shillingsburg, Professor of English and the first Martin J. Svaglic Chair in Textual Studies, 2008–2013, who retires this month. A distinguished textual studies theorist and practitioner, Professor Shillingsburg spearheaded the initiative that led to the founding of the CTSDH in 2009. He has remained inspirational leader and collaborator in its research projects, and has led the way in its funding efforts and programs, including, for example, creating a series of day conferences, co-sponsored by the Center and co-organized by various members of the English department, on issues related to textual studies in various fields. Although he’s retiring this month, he’ll be maintaining that day-conference series during the 2013–2014 academic year. Everyone at the CTSDH gratefully wishes Peter all the best.

NEH Startup Grant for Modernist Networks

NEH ModNets Story

The Modernist Networks project, directed by Pamela Caughie and David Chinitz, has been awarded an NEH Digital Humanities Startup Grant for over $27,000. The funding will sponsor a workshop in August 2013, hosted by the CTSDH, for the technical development of Modernist Networks.

MA in DH graduate Mandy Gagel

Mandy Gagel story

Bancroft Reading Room, UC Berkeley

Mandy Gagel, a 2012 graduate of the MA program in Digital Humanities, who also earned her PhD from Boston University in 2008, began work in March at the Mark Twain Project at the University of California, Berkeley. Mandy will serve as Associate Editor with the project, currently editing Twain manuscripts that will appear in the 3rd and final volume of  Mark Twain's Autobiography (published simultaneously in print through University of California Press and online through the the Twain site). She will also contribute to the TEI/XML encoding of Twain letters to be published on the website and contribute to the editing in general of the mass of manuscripts that reside in Mark Twain archive at UC Berkeley. 

Digital Humanities 2014 conference

Digital Humanities 2014 conference

The call for proposals is now online for the international Digital Humanities conference, to be held in Lausanne, Switzerland, July 6-12, 2014.

Society for Textual Scholarship Conference, Seattle, March 2014

Society for Textual Scholarship Conference, Seattle, March 2014

The Society for Textual Scholarship's International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held March 20-22, 2014, 
at the University of Washington, Seattle. The theme is “Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines.” The deadline for proposals is November 1, 2013.

Call for Papers:

This conference will bring the Society for Textual Scholarship to UW-Seattle, home of the Textual Studies Program, the first of its kind in the U.S. when it was founded in 1997. Situated between the Olympic and Cascade Mountains on the Puget Sound, Seattle is among the most scenic, vibrant, and bookish cities in America. Conference participants will have an opportunity to explore the rich culture of the city, including the Rem Koolhaas-designed Seattle Central Library, the Richard Hugo House, UW Special Collections, and a thriving book arts and craft printing community.

We invite proposals on any aspect of textual scholarship, including the discovery, enumeration, description, bibliographical analysis, editing, annotation, and mark-up of texts from a broad spectrum of disciplines, including literature, history, musicology, classical and biblical studies, philosophy, art history, legal history, the history of science and technology, computer science, library and information science, lexicography, epigraphy, paleography, codicology, cinema studies, new media studies, game studies, theater and performance studies, linguistics, gender and sexuality studies, race and ethnicity studies, indigenous studies, and textual and literary theory.

In honor of the STS’s first trip to the west coast, we especially encourage submissions that traverse disciplinary territory and/or geographic space. Our choice of keynote speakers reflects three key areas of disciplinary and cultural overlap – the digital humanities, histories of the book, and globally comparative philologies – where textual scholarship is closely implicated in current academic and popular debates.

Submissions may take the following forms:

1. Papers. Papers (or papers with slideshow presentations) should be no more than 20 minutes in length, making a significant original contribution to scholarship. Papers that are primarily reports or demonstrations of tools or projects are discouraged.

2. Panels. Panels may consist of either three associated papers or four to six roundtable speakers. Roundtables should address topics of broad interest and scope, with the goal of fostering lively debate with audience participation.

3. Seminars. Seminars should propose a specific topic, issue, or text for intensive collective exploration. Accepted seminar proposals will be announced on the conference Website (http://www.textual.org) at least two months prior to the conference and attendees will then be required to enroll themselves with the posted seminar leader(s). The seminar leader(s) will circulate readings and other preparatory materials in advance of the conference. No papers shall be read at the seminar session. Instead participants will engage with the circulated material in a discussion under the guidance of the seminar leader(s). All who enroll are expected to contribute to creating a mutually enriching experience.

4. Workshops. Workshops should propose a specific problem, tool, or skill set for which the workshop leader will provide expert guidance and instruction. Examples might be an introduction to forensic computing or paleography. Workshop proposals that are accepted will be announced on the conference Website (http://www.textual.org) and attendees will be required to enroll with the workshop leader(s).

Proposals for all formats should include a title; abstract (250 words max.) of the proposed paper, panel, seminar, or workshop; and name, email address, and institutional affiliation for all participants. Format should be clearly indicated. Seminar and workshop proposals in particular should take care to articulate the imagined audience and any expectations of prior knowledge or preparation.

***All abstracts should indicate what if any technological support will be required.***

Inquiries and proposals should be submitted electronically to stsuw14@uw.edu

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For additional contact information:

http://faculty.washington.edu/jtknight/web/ http://frenchitalian.washington.edu/people/geoffrey-turnovsky

All participants in the STS 2014 conference must be members of STS. For information about membership, please visit the society for Textual Scholarship website http://textualsociety.org/membership-information/. For conference updates and information, see the STS website at http://textualsociety.org

 

2013 DHCS (CFP)

Call For Papers

The Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS) aims to bring together researchers and scholars in the humanities and computer science to examine the current state of digital humanities and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research.

This year, the 8th Annual Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science will take place December 6-8, 2013, on the Lincoln Park Campus of DePaul University. The conference will consist of a plenary address by a significant Digital Humanist, as well as panels, roundtables, or other kinds of sessions proposed by scholars relating to recent issues and advances in the digital humanities.

Interested scholars are invited to present proposals for individual papers, entire panels or roundtable sessions by September 15, 2013. Panels will consist of three papers and a commentator/moderator, although other formats are possible. Panel proposals should include a title and brief description of the session as a whole (300 words or less), along with paper titles and abstracts (300 words or less) of all panelists. Short-form CVs (1-2 pages, including institutional affiliation and contact information) should also be attached. Proposals for individual papers will also be considered and are encouraged.

All proposals should be sent by email to BOTH of the Program Co-Chairs for the conference: Professor Robin Burke (rburke@cs.depaul.edu), and Professor Paul B. Jaskot (pjaskot@depaul.edu). Applicants will be informed regarding inclusion on the conference program by September 30, 2013.

Registration will be free. Participants and other interested scholars may register beginning in Fall 2013. At that point, information on the venue, detailed program, local arrangements for hotels and other pertinent information will also be available at the DHCS website: http://chicagocolloquium.org/.

Amy Cavender at Loyola 2012-2013

This year, the MA program in Digital Humanities has been privileged to have among us (as a non-degree candidate) Dr. Amy Cavender, a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross and Associate Professor of Political Science at Saint Mary's College. For her sabbatical year she came to Loyola to study the digital humanities, a field within which she's already well known. Since 2009, Cavender has been a regular contributor to the Chronicle of Higher Education's ProfHacker column. Here's her column on her first semester at Loyola.

Loyola’s Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities Makes New Hire

CTSDH New Hire

The Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH) at Loyola University Chicago is pleased to announce the hiring of Elizabeth (Liz) Hopwood as a new Instructor in Digital Humanities and Textual Studies. Hopwood is a rising scholar in Digital Humanities, Textual Studies, and nineteenth-century American and Caribbean literature.

In May 2016, Hopwood defended her doctoral dissertation in English, “Eating the Atlantic: Nineteenth Century U.S. and Caribbean Literature and the Gastroaesthetic” at Northeastern University. She has authored or co-authored several articles and is at work on an ambitious digital archive and analysis of historic cookbooks. Her scholarship on the Atlantic World, Caribbean literature, and foodways enhances existing areas of strength among Loyola faculty in English, History, and Digital Humanities.

Hopwood has much to contribute to the CTSDH’s research and teaching missions. She brings a wealth of experience in developing and supporting digital projects at Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. She is a Project Manager for the forthcoming Early Caribbean Digital Archive (ecdaproject.org) and part of the core founding team of Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive (http://marathon.neu.edu/). An accomplished teacher, she has taught a range of students at Northeastern University, Salem State University, and Middlesex Community College. During her time at Northeastern, she contributed to the building of a vibrant community of students, faculty, staff, and members of the larger community around the university’s Digital Humanities center.

“I’m delighted to join the CTSDH at Loyola this fall,” says Hopwood. “Loyola has long been a center of ground-breaking DH scholarship and I look forward to continuing this work with faculty, staff, librarians, and students.” Loyola University Chicago’s Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities (CTSDH) is a broadly multidisciplinary research center that offers support for the development, peer review, hosting, and online publication of digital research projects of all kinds. The Center organizes and sponsors events (lectures, symposia, conference, internal training workshops, and exhibitions) and offers a professional Interdisciplinary MA in Digital Humanities. To learn more, visit the Center’s website: www.luc.edu/ctsdh.

For more information, contact Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu)

Graduate or Advanced Undergraduate Job Opportunity

The Digital Services Assistant works closely with the Digital Services Librarian and liaison librarians to collect faculty scholarship for Loyola University Chicago libraries’ eCommons. Job duties include data entry, research, and communication with publishers, faculty, or liaison librarians as appropriate. Other additional duties may be assigned based on interest or experience.    

Minimum Skills and Qualification:

• Proficiency with Microsoft Office suite

• Strong interpersonal skills, including phone and email communication

• Familiarity with data entry, database systems, and/or content management systems.

• Knowledge of scholarly communication cycle

• Attention to detail

• This position is intended for graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may be considered with the right skills and background.

 Job is located at Cudahy Library, Lakeshore Campus.

 Learning Outcomes, Objectives and Duties: 

• Assist the Digital Services Librarian in researching and securing permission to post copyrighted content in Loyola University Chicago libraries’ eCommons.

• Assist liaison librarians in working with faculty to procure and/or post content.

• Post and edit content in eCommons.

• Understand the scholarly communication process, open access, and other related concepts in order to facilitate work.

Qualifications

• Proficiency with Microsoft Office suite

• Strong interpersonal skills, including phone and email communication

• Familiarity with data entry, database systems, and/or content management systems.

 

 Apply through RamblerLink, or send a cover letter and resume to: mheller1@luc.edu.

Looking Back on Fall 2016 at CTSDH

Fall Recap

The fall semester was an exciting time at CTSDH. We launched new faculty, graduate, and undergraduate research projects, introduced a lunchtime lecture series, co-hosted a symposium, and made our Facebook Live debut. Check out ten things CTSDH did this semester, and we welcome you to join us for our spring events!

  1. We mixed and mingled. At the end of September we invited the graduate student community to come learn about what we do at CTSDH. We met with students from a range of academic disciplines—including English, History, Sociology, and Computer Science—ate pizza, drank wine, ran a 3D printer demo, and surveyed participants on what workshops we should hold
  2. We reflected on the history (and future) of Digital Humanities. With Paul Eggert of the English Department, CTSDH ran a one-day symposium called "Instant History: The Postwar Digital Humanities and Their Legacies" with featured panelists Geoffrey Rockwell, Steven Jones, Ted Underwood, and Laura Mandell.
  3. We explored digital archives of the Caribbean. Our first lunchtime lecture was by Elizabeth Hopwood, who spoke of "Building (and Breaking) The Early Caribbean Digital Archive." 
  4. We considered stories of women, leadership, and labor. In our second lunchtime lecture, Nancy Freeman, the director of the Women and Leadership Archives debuted an online exhibit on the fascinating story of Mollie West.
  5.  We learned about the role of text encoding in building digital critical archives. Our third lunchtime lecture featured Paul Eggert, whose talk was entitled "Extracting Oneself from the TEI: The Charles Harpur Critical Archive."
  6. We went live! If you missed them, catch our lunchtime lectures via Facebook
  7. We got social. Thanks to our MA Fellows Maria Palacio, Francis Flynn, and Aman Meghrajani, we launched our Facebook page, Flickr page, and Twitter account. 
  8. We created. CTSDH now has two maker-spaces on the third floor of Loyola Hall, including a text analytics lab and a 3D printing studio. We've made it even easier for visitors to use our space or check out equipment by providing a reservation form and inventory list on our site.
  9. We gamed. To wrap up the semester, we threw a party to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Nintendo Wii. Organized by Francis Flynn, the party was a chance to relax during finals, play some classic Wii games, discuss CodeName Revolution by Center founders Steven Jones and George Thiruvathukal, and reflect on the state of gaming since the Wii. 
  10. We gathered. Digital Humanities doesn't exist without its community of practitioners, scholars, researchers, learners, builders, tinkers, and dabblers, and we were very excited to see so many familiar and new faces this semester. Our Center aims to support the endeavors of the Loyola community, and we invite you to come talk to us about your ideas (find us on the third floor of Loyola Hall!)

 We hope you enjoyed this semester as much as we did and we hope to see you all for are next round of events in the Spring.  

Exploring Common Sense: Creating a Digital Critical Edition

Explore Common Sense (explorecommonsense.com) is a digital critical edition of the first British edition of Thomas Paine's pamphlet Common Sense, which is notable for the redactions that prevented the printer from being arrested for seditious libel.

Creators Kate Johnson, Marie Pellissier, and Kelly Schmidt will discuss the process of working with an original copy of the text in University Archives and Special Collections, creating the site, and its potential as both an interpretive and learning tool inside and outside of the classroom.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu) and be sure to let us know with your RSVP if you have any dietary restrictions.
 

Future Lunchtime Lectures will be added here. Check back for more information!