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Astronomy and Faith: From Lemaitre's Big Bang to the Jesuit Fathers of the Vatican Observatory

Astronomy and Faith

10 November 2016
4:00PM-5:00PM
Palm Court, Mundelein Center, Lake Shore Campus

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact HankCenter@luc.edu.

Against the backdrop of the present-day polemics regarding "science vs. faith" is the story of how the Big Bang model came to be, thanks to a Catholic priest. Frontier research in modern astronomy continues to be pursued today at the Vatican. Speaker Dr. Jonathan Lunine will describe his experiences working with these top-notch Jesuit astronomers.

Dr. Jonathan Lunine is the David C. Duncan Professor in the Physical Sciences and the Director of the Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science. His research interests include how planets form and evolve, what processes maintain and establish habitability, and what kinds of exotic environments might host a kind of chemistry sophisticated enough to be called "life." He pursues these interests through theoretical modeling and participation in spacecraft missions. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has participated in or chaired a number of advisory and strategic planning committees for the Academy and for NASA.

Instant History: The Postwar Digital Humanities and their Legacies

Digital Humanities Conference

24 September 2016
4th Floor, Klarchek Information Commons, Lake Shore Campus

In 1949, Jesuit scholar Father Roberto Busa began to collaborate with IBM to build a massive lemmatized concordance to the works of St. Thomas Aquinas. By the mid-1950s he had established the first humanities computing center in Milan, which both IBM and Father Busa referred to as a Center for Literary Data Processing. This turn toward thinking of texts as data--or as potential sources of data--to be processed using computers and algorithmic, quantitative methods, has its legacy in many of today's digital humanities and electronic textuality, from the creation of electronic editions to so-called distant reading and quantitative analyses and visualizations of very large corpora of texts.

Our day-long conference will explore several aspects of this legacy of Father Busa’s mid-century humanities computing, including the history of natural language processing and digital text processing, systems of textual markup and the creation of digital scholarly editions, topic modeling and large-corpora analysis, with speakers Steven Jones, Geoffrey Rockwell, Laura Mandell and Ted Underwood. Presentations will be followed by a roundtable and general discussion.

This event is sponsored by the Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage, the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, and the Svaglic Chair for Textual Studies. For more information, please contact Paul Eggert at peggert@luc.edu.

Plenary speakers

Laura Mandell, Texas A&M University
What Can You Do with ‘Dirty OCR’?: Digital Literary History beyond the Canon

Geoffrey Rockwell, University of Alberta, Canada
Replicating Father Busa’s Methods

Ted Underwood, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Genealogies of Distance

Steven Jones, University of South Florida
Reverse-Engineering the First Humanities Computing Center: A Media-Archaeology Approach

Citizenship, Public Service, and the Common Good

Citizenship Public Service and the Common Good

‌21-22 September 2016
4th Floor, Klarchek Information Commons, Lake Shore Campus

This event is free and open to the public. For more information please contact HankCenter@luc.edu.

The Hank Center is excited to host a two-day symposium this September called "Citizenship, Public Service, and the Common Good."  In light of the many social ills that have been exposed over the last year and the sometimes-surreal presidential primary season, the Center wanted to bring faculty, students, and concerned citizens together to discuss some of the issues facing us today before the November elections.  On Wednesday, September 21, please join us for scholarly panels during the day on such issues as migration and immigration, gun culture and gun control, and an evening forum on global security and U.S. policy.  On Thursday, September 22, we will offer a panel on "the state of the State" of Illinois, with various political leaders, both local and national.

View the full Citizenship, Public Service, and the Common Good Program here.

Featured speakers include:

  • Peter Neeley, S.J., Kino Border Initiative
  • Katherine Kaufka Walts, Director of the Center for Human Rights of Children
  • Maria Vidal de Haymes, Director of the Institute of Migration and Global Studies in Practice in Social Work
  • Firmin DeBradbander, Author of Do Guns Make Us Free? Democracy and the Armed Society
  • Tobias Winright, Endowed Professor of Health Care Ethics, St. Louis University
  • Shahed Amanullah, Former Senior Advisor, U.S. State Department
  • Hille Haker, Richard McCormick, S.J., Chair of Moral Theology
  • Peter Schraeder, Chair, Department of Political Science
  • Larry Suffredin, Cook County Board District Commissioner
  • Sr. Catherine M. Ryan, O.S.F., Executive Director, Maryville
  • Omar Aquino, Illinois State Senate District 2
  • Pat Quinn, Former Governor of Illinois
  • Daniel Cronin, DuPage County Board Chairman
  • Michael Connelly, Illinois State Senator
  • Honorable Judge Virginia Kendall, Federal District Court of Illinois
  • Miguel Diaz, U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See, Retired; John Courtney Murray Chair in Public Service

My Dream Act: A Play by Martha Razo and Cecilie Keenan

My Dream Act

Martha Razo performs in My Dream Act.

21 September 2016
4th Floor, Klarchek Information Commons, Lake Shore Campus
4:30 PM to 5:30 PM

This event, a part of the Citizenship, Public Service, and Common Good Symposium, is free and open to the public. For more information please contact HankCenter@luc.edu.

My Dream Act, co-written by Martha Razo and Cecilie Keenan, is a unique piece of theater told in first person by a young woman - Martha Razo - who has lived all her life as an undocumented citizen of the United States since she crossed the Rio Grande river at the age of one with her parents.

Through a combination of characters, monologues, music and dancing, Martha evolves from the frightened child -- told by her parents to remain silent or risk losing them -- to a young woman who risks everything in hopes of higher education and the realization of her dreams. Martha, now 22 and well on her way to earning a master's degree in mathematics and becoming a documented USA resident, uses her passionate voice to tell her story as a way to advocate for others who have lived through similar experiences.

Through Martha's dramatic telling of her own story audiences learn of America's own immigration challenges and in the process join in the migrant's journey of struggles, hopes, and dreams for a better future for all.

My Dream Act, performed by Martha Razo under the direction of Cecilie Keenan, is presented by Frontera: Artists Crossing Borders. Frontera is a project of the Chicago Network for Justice and Peace.

In collaboration with artists and theatres, Frontera develops plays and performance pieces based on the personal narratives of migrants who describe their experiences crossing the physical, cultural, political, and economic borders of our contemporary world in order to find the safety and opportunity to live their lives in dignity and freedom.