Loyola University Chicago

- Navigation -

Loyola University Chicago

University Information Security Office

DMCA

When you share copyrighted files without the permission of the copyright holder, you are breaking the law.  This most commonly occurs when students use peer-to-peer (P2P) software to share music, movies, television shows, and other copyrighted works.  P2P software includes programs such as LimeWire, BitTorrent, Morpheus and others.  The DMCA provides "safe harbor" for schools if they designate an agent to process copyright infringement complaints, and if they work to promptly remove the infringing material from their network. To read more about Loyola's DMCA click here.

What does this mean for me?
It can mean several things.  First, some programs generate so much traffic that we will automatically remove your computer from the network if we detect them. Second, if you are sharing files and the copyright holder detects it, we will forward their notice on to you, and you will be fined.

What if I only use file-sharing software while I'm at home?
Remember that most file-sharing software will run in the background, automatically uploading any files that you have downloaded.  The easiest way to confirm that these programs are not sharing any files is to uninstall them.  Also, you may receive a DMCA notice from your Internet Service Provider (ISP) while you are at home.

 

What happens if I receive a DMCA notice?
Typically the process follows these steps:
1. Loyola University Chicago DMCA agent receives DMCA notice.
2. DMCA agent forwards the notice to student, copying the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution.

3. Student is disabled from Loyola's network.
3. Student has to uninstall the program, delete the files, and complete a DMCA test with 100% accuracy.
4. Student meets with the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution. In most cases, sanctions will be applied to the student.

    *Harsher sanctions will be applied to students who have had previous DMCA violations.
5. The copyright holder still retains the option of bringing a civil case against the student. To date no Loyola University Chicago students have been sued as the result of a DMCA notice, but that could change.


How can I protect myself?
There are a number of steps you can take to protect yourself.
1. Uninstall any file-sharing programs that you have on your computer.

2. If you let someone else install programs on your computer, be sure to let them know that you do not want them to install any file-sharing software.  This also applies to family members when you bring your computer home.
3. Look into legal alternatives for sharing files and accessing new music.

How can I protect myself?

There are a number of steps you can take to protect yourself.
1. Uninstall any file-sharing programs that you have on your computer.

2. If you let someone else install programs on your computer, be sure to let them know that you do not want them to install any file-sharing software.  This also applies to family members when you bring your computer home.
3. Look into legal alternatives for sharing files and accessing new music.

What are some legal options for enjoying digital music and videos?
A list of popular and legal  movies, shows,  music and more are available to you at: http://www.luc.edu/uiso/legal_content.shtml

What if I have questions?
If you have questions about what software is installed on your machine, or how to configure iTunes or Ruckus to legally share music, go to:
http://luc.edu/resnet/ to contact ResNet.

If you have questions about the DMCA, send an email to DMCA-Agent@luc.edu.



Loyola

Information Technology Services
1032 W. Sheridan Ave. · Chicago, IL 60660 · 773.508-7373
DataSecurity@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy