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Symposium

2007 Shared Text Symposium: Callings

Keynote Address: Daniel Hartnett, S.J., Rector of the Jesuit Community

“The Two Dynamics of Justice”

   Tuesday, September 11, in Simpson Multipurpose, LSC, 4:00 p.m.

   Wednesday, September 12, in Simpson Multipurpose, LSC, 7:00 p.m.


Social justice is a guiding principle at Loyola University Chicago. When considering the question of justice, however, the focus tends mostly to be on "distributive justice" (i.e., what society owes to its individual members in terms of how resources are allocated). But we also need to consider "contributive justice" (i.e., what individuals owe society for the sake of building up the common good). Paul Farmer exemplifies one very creative way of bringing these two dynamics of justice together; the lecture will present other important ways.


   
Tuesday, September 11, Simpson Multipurpose, Lake Shore Campus

8:30   Rachel Webster, MFA, Writing Instructor                

  “The Poem’s Call”

Poetry calls us to experience our lives with heightened consciousness, emotion,
and spirituality.  Poet and writing instructor Rachel Webster will talk about the vocation of the poet and will share a few poems in which the poet’s inner voice invites us to awaken to our own callings.

Kessel     Webster   Whitt

 

10:00   Jennifer Haworth, Ph.D., Vice President of Ministry and Mission, and Loyola students 
 
"What should I do with my life?  Lessons from the Open Road"

What do the Vice President of Global Compliance for the Gap, an Episcopalian priest, the founder of GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network), a Harvard track coach, and a mezzo soprano in the New York Opera have in common? A lot more than you might think—all followed their callings to be who they are today, and all were interviewed by Loyola students last Spring Break as part of a new Evoke-sponsored Alternative Break Immersion (ABI), called “The Call of the Open Road.”  In this session, a few of these students will discuss the call stories of their interviewees, and how these call stories have left an imprint on the students’ thinking about what they'd like to do with their lives. 

Adams   Anderson   Kessel   Walsh

 

1:00   Mark Bosco, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English and Theology

"Call/ing it Catholic:  Sensing a Vocation"

This lecture will present the distinctly Catholic manner in which one's vocation is wrapped up in discerning and sensing God's presence in the world in and around us. Mention will be made not only of the personal vocation of the speaker but also to that of Flannery O'Connor, the great American Catholic writer of the 20th century.

Kessel    Webster

 

2:30   Robert Bucholz, Ph.D., Professor of History

"Apologia pro Vita Historiae; or Why I Hang Out with Dead People."  

This talk explains how my choice for a professional life began as a hobby,
transformed into a goal, then into a job, and finally became a true vocation.  I will
conclude by arguing that a knowledge of History is perhaps the most important
tool in the tool-kit of the educated citizen.  It is my honor and pleasure and
privilege to help young citizens forge that tool. 

Adams   Hadjiselimovic   Heckman   Krughoff

 

4:00   Rebecca Burwell, Ph.D., Faculty, Chicago Semester

“Hearing the Call: Reflections on Work, Community, and the Common Good”
 
In this discussion, we'll explore our individual gifts and how we negotiate
those desires within the context of community.  One issue we'll reflect on
is our role in impacting the common good.

Adams, Dumbach Hall 4 (lower level)

Tuesday, September 11, Water Tower Campus

 

10:00  Michael Maher, Ph.D., Chaplain, University Ministry

“What kind of nut are you? Thinking about how you don't fit a type”

We'll start with an activity that examines how we organize the things we
encounter and discuss that.  I'll give a short version of how I came to be a lay
chaplain (something I've done for 18 years).

MacKenna-Sandhir     Lewis Towers 602

 

11:30   Kelly Shannon, Vice President for Marketing

“A Calling to Communicate”

From a start as a broadcast journalist to VP of Marketing for Loyola, Kelly
Shannon will share her journey of work, passion, and commitment to excellence. 

Mackenna-Sandhir        Maguire Hall 303

 

Wednesday, September 12, Simpson Multipurpose, Lake Shore Campus

8:15   Joe Early, Associate Director, EVOKE, and Loyola students     

"What should I do with my life?  Lessons from the Open Road"

What do the Vice President of Global Compliance for the Gap, an Episcopalian priest, the founder of GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network), a Harvard track coach, and a mezzo soprano in the New York Opera have in common? A lot more than you might think—all followed their callings to be who they are today, and all were interviewed by Loyola students last Spring Break as part of a new Evoke-sponsored Alternative Break Immersion (ABI), called “The Call of the Open Road.”  In this session, a few of these students will discuss the call stories of their interviewees, and how these stories have left an imprint on the students’ thinking about what they'd like to do with their lives. 

 Chu   Sullivan   Weller

 

9:20   Tom Gleason, Cabinet Maker

 "By Hand, With Heart"

  At the age of 18, not really having examined the opportunities education would
provide, I opted to follow my Dad's example into accounting.  It didn't take long
to realize that the ephemeral aspects of accounting didn't jive with the satisfaction I received from actually producing something.  My woodworking avocation became vocation.  Finding a career choice, with which you absolutely fall in love, is a wondrous blessing.  Eventually opportunities arise (mentoring wood workers in Nicaragua) to give back. 

Loweth   Sullivan   Urban   Weller

 

10:25   Camille Helkowski, Associate Director, Career Center

“Working to Your Heart's Content”

Who you are and what you do are inextricably connected.  Choosing work that's
satisfying and meaningful requires that you listen to both your head and your
heart while you explore your options.  Developing a vision of yourself and for
yourself is the focus of this presentation.

Jacobs   Loweth   Urban


11:30   Robert Klaus, Ph.D., President and CEO, Oral Health America

“Vocation as Politics: Not-for-Profit Health Advocacy”

Goetz   Jacobs

 

12:35   Rachel Hart, Chaplain, University Ministry 

“the o for the p”

This talk will explore how my encounters with marginalized people in
other cultures have deepened my sense of responsibility and re-affirmed my
commitment to global solidarity and justice.  Paul Farmer, in Mountains Beyond
Mountains, refers to the Preferential Option for the Poor as the “o for the p”.   I
will discuss how my understanding of this term, through both my experiences and
my study of Liberation Theology, has helped shape my own vocation.

 Loweth   Urban

 

1:40    Dr. Joseph DiCara, M.D., Pediatrician, and Executive Director and Founder, Chicago Youth Programs.

“From Lakeshore Drive to Cabrini Green”

When he was a medical student at Northwestern in the 1980s, Joe DiCara was attending classes in one of the wealthiest areas of Chicago, but only a short distance away from one of the poorest, Cabrini Green. Along with other medical students, DiCara could not look the other way when he heard about the violent lifestyles, teenage pregnancies, and school dropout rates of the young people living nearby.   He eventually set up the program now know as The Chicago Youth Programs, which provides tutoring and mentoring to disadvantaged youth as well as recreation and sports activities and access to medical care.
Boyle   Jacobs   Loweth

2:45   Rachel Hart, Chaplain, University Ministry
 
 “the o for the p”

My encounters with marginalized people in other cultures have deepened my sense of responsibility and re-affirmed my commitment to global solidarity and justice.  Paul Farmer, in Mountains Beyond Mountains, refers to the Preferential Option for the Poor as the “o for the p”. My understanding of this term, through both my experiences and my study of Liberation Theology, has helped shape my own vocation.
Boyle   Goetz   Weller

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