Loyola University Chicago

John Felice Rome Center

FnAr 115 Digital Photography

Summer 2013 - Session II

 

FNAR 115 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN ROME

FNAR 115  Digital Photography 

Summer Session II  TTH 2:00 – 6:10 pm

Tom Denlinger, Instructor                           

Office hours: Tues 12:00-2:00 & by appt.

Loyola University, John Felice Rome Center

tdenling@depaul.edu

 

Digital Photography in Rome: the digital camera as a documentary tool

This class is an introduction to the digital camera (and its accompanying online and computer software interface) as both a documentary tool and an expressive device.  In this class we will explore the proper use of the camera, as well as the deployment of digital images online and through computer interfaces.  We will also consider the culture of representation that is part and parcel of the camera’s role in our lives today.  Toward this end you will learn to frame, record, and correctly modify images, while exploring the documentary possibilities of the digital environment, including documentation of historical forms, and using images to convey content through visual narrative.

Additionally we will be exploring the functions of this imaging machine in Rome, which will provide  a wealth of historic and contemporary documentary material.

 

OBJECTIVES and GOALS

In this class you will become familiar with how photographs are manufactured and processed in the camera, in the digital environment and in our culture, as well as how images are created and/or assembled to frame and present concepts and ideas. In addition, you will examine images and visual culture as framed by the Eternal City, and in general through museum exhibitions, historical architecture and artifacts, readings, discussions, and presentations.

 

Although this class uses the online environment, and you will be trained in the use of some computer software, the emphasis is on the camera and the use of it to document situations and generate ideas, your ideas. Your challenge is to learn to control and direct the conceptual structure of your photographs, as well as to foster your own intellectual development as a media artist.

 

As such this class is an introduction to:

_Proper use of the digital camera

_Digital image editing, color theory and application, file organization

_Photographic and 2-D compositional practices

_Photographic Documentation: Truth, Fiction and the Historic environment

_The use of Sequencing and Narrative (direct and implied)

 

In this course you will be responsible for:

Three projects (two main projects and a Final project), a research paper, an artist presentation, a portfolio of your work, and weekly camera assignments.

Grading and Evaluation of projects, assignments and exercises:

Artist presentation                                                       17%

Exercises, readings and discussions, participation         18%

Project 1                                                                    20%

Project 2                                                                     20%

Project 3 (Final Project) w/written component 25%

Attendance & Class Participation -- You are expected to participate and contribute.

If you do not, I will deduct points from your grade.

 

EVALUATION~ Students will be evaluated on their comprehension of concepts, their participation in class discussions, and their engagement with the material as demonstrated by the quality of the construction and execution of their projects, as well as the paper and presentation.

 

Average work merits a “C” in this course. Simply following the requirements of the assignment does not result in an “A”. To achieve an “A” or a “B” work must be thoughtful, original, and go beyond the stated requirements of the assignment, as well as demonstrate excellent craft and superior knowledge of camera use and technique.

 

A = Excellence. Superior understanding of concepts, materials and techniques.

B = Above average. Student demonstrates clear understanding of goals, materials and techniques, and exceeds the expectations for the assignment.

C = Average. Goals were met, but there is little motivation beyond this. Average understanding of materials, techniques or concepts.

D = Below average. Work of poor quality. Below average understanding of materials, concepts or techniques.

F = Unacceptable. Work of unsatisfactory quality throughout the semester. Little or no effort has been made to satisfy the criteria of the assignments.

 

Instructional Policy

  • This course requires students to be responsible not only for the themes covered in lectures and class discussions, but also for textual material in photocopies and handouts. For this reason, and because of the short and extremely concentrated term of study in Summer session II, students are required to attend class. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to obtain the class notes and instructions from one of your peers.
  • The classroom is intended to be a respectful place, in which students contribute frequently and listen attentively to their colleagues and other speakers. It is a space reserved for the pursuit of knowledge and the development of critical thinking.
  • No cell phones may be used in the classroom. All cell phone are to be turned off during class periods, no matter the location. No texting or checking of email is allowed during class. Similarly, other forms of distraction and discourteous behavior will not be tolerated.

 

Attendance and Late Work Policies:

PRESENTATIONS, DISCUSSIONS, CLASS ASSIGNMENTS AND MATERIALS WILL INCLUDE INFORMATION THAT IS NOT REPRODUCED ELSEWHERE. CLASSTIME SHOULD NOT BE SPENT COLLECTING OR PREPARING MATERIALS, NOR SHOOTING OR RESEARCHING. if you can’t keep up with a class assignment or project, please use lab time outside of the class time (approximately 5-7 hours per week.)

 

Students should arrive promptly to class and avoid absences. Any absence, late or leave early will affect your grade percentage. If you come to class without proper required materials to work it is considered an absence. Two lates will be considered one absence (class starts promptly at 2 Pm)

*Except for extreme circumstances, 3 absences constitute an F for the class. No more than ONE excuse can be used on medical situations.

 

Late Work

Late work will be accepted only up to one meeting later than originally due and will be lowered one full grade.

 

Incomplete work will not be accepted, and will be considered late until finished and handed in, as per the rule governing late work (above)

 

Academic Integrity

Please read the complete Academic Integrity policy in the Loyola University student handbook.

 

 

FNAR 115 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN ROME

Summer session II

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

-DIGITAL CAMERA with the ability to make manual settings

  *If possible, a Digital SLR camera is preferable.  But consumer grade cameras are also very compatible with this class IF THE CAMERA ALLOWS MANUAL SETTINGS.

-camera storage card and spare card (2 gigabytes min.)

-card reader and/or USB connection for camera to download images (usually comes with camera)

-Storage device such as a large flash drive (4 -10 gigabytes) or small external hard drive (20 – 50 gigabytes minimum)

-Small portable camera tripod

-suggested: lens shade if possible with your camera

 

FEES FOR EXHIBITIONS

You will need to go to at least two and perhaps three museum or gallery exhibitions, so please put aside at least twenty to thirty euros for museum fees.

 

Suggested software, IF YOU HAVE A LAPTOP:

Some version of photograph editing software such as Photoshop (can be an abbreviated version) OR i-photo OR other photo editing software of some kind; also Microsoft Word for written assignments, and POWERPOINT for presentations

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

  1. Berger, John, and Jean Mohr. Ch 1, Ways of Seeing. New York: Vintage Books.

2.   London, Barbara, and Jim Stone. 1996. A Short Course in Photography. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Especially: Pp. 15-19, 26, 38-39

3.   Rodchenko, Alexander. The Paths of Modern Photography. Pp. 256-266 in Photography in the Modern Era: European Documents and Critical Writing, 1913-1940. Ed. Christopher Phillips. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Aperture, 1989.

  1.  “In Plato’s Cave,” from On Photography by Susan Sontag

 

 

 

 

 

FNAR 115 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN ROME

COURSE CALENDAR SUMMER SESSION II

Instructor reserves the right to change the syllabus with advanced notification.

At least once a week, on Thursday, the class will convene at locations around Rome rather than at the John Felice Rome Center. On Tuesdays we will convene at the JFR Center to go over your work from the previous week, to compare notes, work through problems, and to work on image organization and output. In addition there will be reading discussions and presentations designed to enlarge and enhance your conceptual development, as well as to work with the digital camera and environment.

 

WEEK ONE

T July 2            ~Convene at John Felice Rome Center.

                        ~Introduction to the course _ PLEASE BRING YOUR CAMERA AND MANUAL

~Short discussion: What is digital photography?

~The DSLR Camera: functions, EV, shutter speed, ISO

 

~Intro to YOUR camera – functions, menu, settings

~Discuss white balance and Kelvin scale.

~Shooting demo outside – use of available light and tripod.

 

~The computer interface, software and online environment

~File Storage and transfer, equipment for storage and transfer

Terms: DSLR, RAW, DNG, EV, F-STOP, SHUTTER SPEED, FLASH DRIVE, EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE,

Assignment: bring in your camera WITH MANUAL and tripod for NEXT class   in Rome.

LEARN your manual and menu settings. How do you control the individual settings on your camera (aperture, shutter speed, ISO)?

Does your camera shoot in RAW format or JPEG, or both?

Reading assignment: handout

Intro: At Home on the (EV) Range

Introduction to Project One

Assignment: What Light? White balance exercises

 

TH July 4         Exposure Challenges #1 Due at the beginning of class for review.

                        Field trip to Piazza Navona: Exercises on site.

                        ~Bring assignment sheets

~Exposure Challenges Part Two

                                   -working with partners in groups of two and three

           -basic compositional issues

           -ISO and exposure functions as concept generative tools

                        ~Thinking of narrative – shooting for content and documentation

-         basic compositional issues

-         ISO and exposure functions as concept generative tools

 

Terms: CF CARD, SD CARD, WORKFLOW, RAM, GRAY CARD, WHITE BALANCE CARD, KELVIN SCALE, HUE, SATURATION, COLOR CAST IN A PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINT, COLOR CHECKER CARD

           

WEEK TWO            

T July 9            Convene at John Felice Rome Center.

Due: Project One for review.

Due: At home on the EV range (Exposure Value exercise)     

Due: reading due for discussion

Introduction of Project Two

Downloading your photos

Bringing photos into computer environment, and online.

-Library: creating files, organizing your catalog and files.

-Develop: Color/temperature adjustments, Histograms, sharpening.

-Processing photos efficiently

-Synchronization of settings and processes, time management and workflow.

                                   -PPI vs DPI

                        Lightroom or Microsoft Slide module - Build slide shows in powerpoint or lightroom.

                        Narrative and concept in slide assembly

 

                        More Lab (capturing and organization)

                                                          

                        Terms: HISTOGRAM, RGB, CMYK, INCIDENT, ADDITIVE LIGHT COLOR,                                 SUBTRACTIVE INK COLOR, PROJECTED COLOR SPACE, REFLECTIVE                                  COLOR SPACE, PPI, DPI

Reading assignment

 

TH July 11       Convene at John Felice Center Exposure Challenges #2 Due                            

                        Field trip to the Pantheon for extreme lighting situations shooting demo and                               more exercises.

~Thinking of narrative – shooting for content

                        Destinations: Pantheon, San Luigi dei Francesi, Campo de Fiori

                        Bring Tripod to this and every city situation. 

 

WEEK THREE

T  July 16         Convene at John Felice Center

                        iPhoto or Microsoft Slide module - Building slide shows in iPhoto, Powerpoint

                        Narrative and concept in slide assembly.

                        Slide presentation

                        Reading Assignment

                        Introduction of Final Project

                        Field trip to Fontana di Trevi: Exercises on site.

                        Destinations: Fontana di Trevi, Cappucine monastery, Santa Maria De

 

 

TH   July 18     Convene at John Felice Center

                        Due: Project Two due for review and class-wide critique

                       

                       

WEEK FOUR

T July 23          Convene at John Felice Rome Center.

                        Due: artist presentations

                        Individual meetings for Project Three

Assessment of work, organization, printing, electronic output, and/or alternative output of final project.

                                              

TH  July 25      Convene at John Felice Rome Center for review of work in progress

                       

Fri July 26        Due: Final project for review and class-wide critique