Loyola University Chicago

- Navigation -

Loyola University Chicago

John Felice Rome Center

ENGL 273 Exploring Fiction

Summer 2014 - Session II

Loyola University of Chicago - The John Felice Rome Program

Introduction to Fiction

ENG 273

MTWTh 2pm – 4:05pm Room  TBA Instructor: Andrea Pacor

E-mail: apacor@luc.edu

Office: 116

Office Hours: after class and by appointment

 

 

Credits & hours: 3 credits; two one hour and twenty-five minute meetings weekly

Course description:

 

The course focuses on the development of modern Anglo-American literature by surveying and analysing representative works from the English Romantic Movement and the period leading towards the construction of an American National Identity in literature (1800-1840), to the 20th century. We will first look at programmatic or theoretical discussion by prominent authors in each period; we will then proceed to trace the relevance and/or direct application of the stated principles within literary texts from each period. Broadly speaking, the readings are divided into four sections: romanticism, realism, modernism and post-modernity. Each section ends with an in-class essay in which students are expected to discuss with competence the literary theory of the period, and illustrate the critical concepts through specific reference to relevant literary texts.

 

Learning Objectives

 

1.   To trace the development of Anglo-American fiction from the Romantics to the present through select authors and works representative of specific literary periods.

 

2.   To analyse literary texts in light of the leading ideas and concepts driving artistic production in each period. To learn to recognize and identify different stylistic and content choices in the readings.

 

3.   To conduct analysis effectively through close reading, application of concepts, and re- organization of ideas and information. To present findings coherently and effectively in written form.

 

 

 

Assessment

 

1.   Four critical in-class essays (600 words; 20% each). Each will focus on a specific period.

Students will characterize the relevant period, present the guiding ideas underlying the literary production of the time, and illustrate the presented concepts with concrete and specific

examples from a selection of the assigned readings. Students are strongly encouraged to prepare an outline to pace their work, and to include a selection of quotes from the primary

sources for use in the essay. The outline must be submitted with the in-class essay.

Learning Objective: To demonstrate familiarity with the readings and the associated literary history; to learn to read with a purpose and re-organize material as evidence in a coherent

presentation of the essential features of a given literary production.

2.   Daily in-class writing (150 words). At the beginning of class, students will take five minutes to briefly answer a simple, content-related question on the assigned readings. The final grade

for the assignment will be calculated on an average of the best 14 attempts.

 

Learning Objective: To show familiarity with the assigned reading. To learn to read with a purpose.

3.   Participation (10%). Students are expected to contribute to class discussion with specific and concrete observations and questions.

Learning Objective: To begin to see critical analysis as discourse, i.e. a conversation

between informed individuals, each contributing from their own unique subject position. To

practice presenting one’s own ideas and engaging the ideas of others constructively and

respectfully.

 

Grading

 

Four in-class essays                            80% (20% each) Daily in-class writing (best 14)                         10% Participation        10%

 

Required Texts

 

McMichael, George and James S. Leonard, eds. Anthology of American Literature Volume II. 10th ed.

Boston: Longman, 2011. Print. (ISBN: 978-0-205-77936-9)

 

Supporting / Recommended course reading material

 

Supporting material will be made available electronically via Sakai

 

Attendance Requirement

 

 

 

Students with more than two unexcused absences will fail the course.

 

 

Academic Honesty

 

 

Students are responsible for all work they submit for evaluation. This includes proper acknowledgment of all sources used or consulted in completing the assignment. Student work should be original and intellectually honest. Thus, the inclusion in your assignment of any ideas or portions of text that you “borrow” from another source without proper attribution constitute plagiarism. I will report students engaging in academic dishonesty to the Dean’s office and award an F (zero points) to the relevant assignment. As a rule, I notify the Dean before I inform the student. Possible consequences include failing the class and/or suspension from Loyola University.

 

Course Schedule

 

M T

 

 

 

 

W

Jun. Jul.

 

 

 

 

Jul.

30

1

 

 

 

 

2

Course Introduction

Wordsworth, “from Preface to the Lyrical Ballads”;

Emerson, “Self-Reliance,” Thoreau, “Where I lived…” (Sakai) Edgar Allan Poe, “The Tell Tale Heart” (Sakai);

Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself” (71-118 stanzas 1; 16; 21; 23; 51-52) Nathaniel Hawthorne, “The Minister's Black Veil” (Sakai);

 

 

Th

 

 

Jul.

 

 

3

Emily Dicksinson, “I Felt a Funeral in My Brain” (182);

William Blake, “The Sick Rose” (Sakai)

In-Class Essay 1/4: The Romantics

M

 

 

 

 

T

Jul.

 

 

 

 

Jul.

7

 

 

 

 

8

The Lit. of the Late 19th Century (1-7);

Mark Twain, “Life on the Mississippi” (12-14);

William Dean Howells, “from Criticism and Fiction” (22-29) Henry James, “Daisy Miller: A Study” (502-541)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wall-Paper”; “If I Were a Man” (666-681)

 

W

 

Jul.

 

9

Kate Chopin, “The Storm (688-692)

Stephen Crane, “The Monster” (827-865)

 

TH

 

Jul.

 

10

Jack London, “To Build a Fire” (879-889)

In-Class Essay 2/4: Realism and Naturalism

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

Jul.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul.

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

“The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900-1945)” (986-991); Booker T. Washington, “The Atlanta Exposition Address” (1006-1009);

James Weldon Johnson, “from The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man” (1151-

1173)

W.E.T. DuBois, “from The Souls of Black Folk” (from 1089) (read “The

Forethought” “XI,” and “The Afterthought”);

Jean Toomer, “from Cane - Blood Burning Moon” (1532-1538) T.S. Eliot, “Tradition and the Individual Talent” (1009-1016);

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

 

Jul.

 

 

 

 

16

Ezra Pound, “A Retrospect” (1016-1022);

T.S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1359-1363)

James Joyce, “A Painful Case”; Virginia Woolf, “The Mark On the Wall” (Sakai) Willa Cather, “Paul's Case” and “A Wagner Mattinee” (1184-1202)

 

 

Th

 

 

Jul.

 

 

17

Ernest Hemingway “In Another Country” (1592-1595);

William Faulkner, “Barn Burning (1597-1609)

In-Class Essay 3/4: Modernism

M

 

 

 

 

T

Jul.

 

 

 

 

Jul.

21

 

 

 

 

22

“The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945-1999)” (1652-1656);

Ishmael Reed, “from Multiamerica - Introduction” (Sakai) Jack Kerouac, “Mexico Fallaheen” (1738-1746);

Kurt Vonnegut, “Harrison Bergeron” (1945-1949)

Maxine Hong Kingston, “No Name Woman” (1897-1906)

 

W

 

Jul.

 

23

Joyce Carol Oates, “The Birth of Tragedy” (1966-1982)

Raymond Carver, “Cathedral” (2079-2088) and “The Father” (Sakai)

 

Th

 

Jul.

 

24

Thomas Pynchon, “Entropy” (2167-2177)

In-Class Essay 4/4 Postmodernism

 

F.

 

Jul.

 

25

 

Wrap-Up

 

Loyola

John Felice Rome Center · Sullivan Center for Student Services· 6339 N. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL 60660
Mailing Address: 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660
800.344.ROMA · rome@luc.edu

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy