Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Quinlan School of Business

Finance

The curriculum of the BBA in Finance exposes students to the theory of finance and its application to decision making, financial management, investments, and financial institutions. Financial tools are introduced and applied to problem solving in a variety of areas including financial markets and institutions, financial management, capital budgeting, international financial management, portfolio theory, derivatives, and risk management.

The Basics

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About the Finance Department

The Department of Finance at Loyola University Chicago stresses excellence in both teaching and research. Compared with other Chicago-area schools, the Quinlan School of Business is considered one of the finest for undergraduate training in finance. The department is especially well-known for its expertise in financial institutions and derivatives.

Students interact with many of Chicago's leading businesses through guest speakers from corporations, consulting firms, non-profit organizations, and other enterprises. Moderate class sizes provide students with personal interaction with the faculty. Most classes are taught by full-time faculty who are exceptionally well-trained in current developments in their discipline. Most members of the department hold the PhD degree and are active in research and publishing.

Degree Requirements

In addition to Core Curriculum and Business Core Curriculum requirements, students pursuing the BBA degree in finance must complete 15 credit hours in the following courses: 

Important Details:

At the discretion of the Quinlan School of Business assistant dean, a maximum of one transfer course, taken prior to matriculating at Loyola University Chicago, may be allowed. A 2.0 average GPA is required for all attempted business courses. Quinlan school students are limited to double dipping one course between majors/minors, while non-Quinlan students are limited to double dipping two courses between business school minors.

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