Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Psychology

Patricia Rupert

Title: Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology; Department Chair; Ph.D. 
Office: n/a 
Phone: 773.508.2970 
E-mail: prupert@luc.edu 

 


Personal Information

Ph.D., 1977, University of Kansas
M.A., 1973, Wright State University
B.S., summa cum laude, 1969, Miami University

Website:  PIER Lab

Research Interests:

My research interests include professional burnout, work-family integration, and ethical issues related to managed mental health care, confidentiality, and professional relationships. Over the past ten years, my lab has completed four national surveys examining the impact of managed care on the practice of psychology and factors associated with burnout, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction among professional psychologists. These surveys examined a range of variables related to work setting and work activities; client and psychologist characteristics; work satisfactions and stresses; and positive career sustaining behaviors or coping strategies that may help psychologists prevent burnout and maintain well functioning.  In addition, my graduate students have conducted a wide range of projects on ethical and professional issues, including work-family spillover, coping with negative client behaviors and burnout, management of confidentiality with HIV infected clients and with adolescent clients, use of touch in psychotherapy, and dual relationships with former psychotherapy clients.

My lab has just completed a two-phase longitudinal survey examining work, family, and personal factors that predict burnout and life satisfaction among practicing psychologists. We are now preparing to launch a study of factors related to gender differences in career and family plans, anticipated work-family conflict, and work-family facilitation in graduating college seniors.

Recent Publications:

Rupert, P.A., Stevanovic, P., & Hunley, H.A. (2009) Work-family conflict and burnout among

            professional psychologists. Professional Psychology:Research and Practice, 40, 54-61.

 

Stevanovic, P. & Rupert, P.A. (2009). Work-family spillover and life satisfaction among

            professional psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research  and Practice, 40, 62-68.

 

Rupert, P.A., & Kent, J.S. (2007). Gender and work setting differences in career- sustaining
            behaviors and burnout among professional psychologists. Professional Psychology:
            Research and Practice, 38,
88-96.

 

Rupert, P.A., & Morgan, D.J. (2005). Work setting and burnout among professional
            psychologists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36, 544-550.

 

Rupert, P.A. & Baird, K.A. (2004). Managed care and the independent practice of psychology.   

Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 35, 185-193.

 

Stevanovic, P., & Rupert, P.A. (2004). Career-sustaining behaviors, satisfactions,
            and stresses of professional psychologists. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research,
            Practice, Training, 41,
301-309.
            (Summary published in Clinician’s Research Digest, March, 2005.)

 

Stenzel, C.L., & Rupert, P.A. (2004). Psychologists’ use of touch in individual psychotherapy.
            Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 41, 332-345.
 



Loyola

Psychology Department · 1032 W. Sheridan Road · Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3001 · Fax: 773.508.8713

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