Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Psychology

Course Offerings

The following undergraduate courses are taught through Loyola's Department of Psychology:

Basic concepts and methods of psychology. Primary emphasis on the scientific study of consciousness and human behavior. Topics include: human development, personality, learning, thinking, perception, testing, mental illness and mental health, and biological and social aspects of behavior. Prerequisite for all other PSYC courses except PSYC 275 (Social Psychology) and PSYC 238 (Gender and Sex Differences and Similarities).

Psychological aspects of parenting are reviewed from the perspectives of both parent and child with consideration given to the effect of developmental, social, and cultural forces. Lectures and exercises are combined in order to evaluate relevant theories and research from both the academic and personal perspectives.

Sexuality as an important aspect of human functioning and its integration into the total person will be emphasized. Topics include: the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of human sexuality, along with sexual dysfunction, and sex roles.

Consideration of theory and research related to the differences between males and females resulting from biological factors, learning, and social roles. Topics include traditional and non-traditional roles, role strain, social and psychological factors influencing role choice, and implications for adults’ interpersonal, parental, and work orientations.

Consideration of vision and audition emphasizing: (1) historical development of the field; (2) multi-disciplinary scientific approaches; (3) recent research and theory on the mechanisms of seeing and hearing; and (4) applications.

Overview of cognitive psychology. Topics include: human information processing, storage and retrieval processes, mental imagery, language, thinking, artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, and problem solving. Group A.

Introduction to the understanding of behavior based on principles of learning and behavior control derived from the study of classical and instrumental (operant) conditioning. Interactions between innate dispositions and experimental factors are discussed, as is the application of conditioning-learning principles to such areas as behavior therapy, education, and self-control. Group A.

Survey of theory and research relevant to human growth and development with emphasis on personality, maturation, and learning. Group B.

Prerequisites: Sophomore/junior psychology majors; instructor’s permission. Opportunity to gain practical experience in community social service agencies. Students volunteer in an approved agency of their choice for a minimum of six hours per week of supervised work related to their psychology major. Students also participate in seminars with speakers and small group sessions discussing their experiences. PSYC 300 is a service learning course.

A systematic treatment of the historical roots and foundation of psychology. Special emphasis is placed on relating past trends to current developments.

Previous math courses recommended. Fundamentals of statistical analysis in psychology and education. Topics include: frequency distribution, central tendency, variability, graphical presentation, normal distribution, correlation, sampling distributions, and tests of statistical significance including analysis of variance.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or BIOL 102.<br />Historical and theoretical foci with consideration of: (1) basic anatomy of the nervous system and the physiology of nerve cells; (2) representation in the brain and production of motor behavior; and (3) neural mechanisms of selected "high mental functions" such as learning, memory, psychopathology, perception, motivation, emotion, sleep, and arousal. Group A.

Prerequisite: PSYC 304.<br />Logic and theory of the scientific method. Basic statistics and principles of research methodologies employed in approaching major problem areas in psychology.

Analysis of language as symbol-behavior specific to humans, language structure and competence, language performance, and the neurophysiological basis of language. Methods for investigating language processing, acquisition, bilingualism, and language disorders will be considered. Group A.

Prerequisite: PSYC 306; PSYC 275 recommended.<br />Special attention is given to the fundamental skills needed to evaluate human service programs including research methodology and research diplomacy. The strengths and weaknesses of several evaluation strategies will be discussed in terms of scientific validity, ethical constraints, and political acceptability. Students will receive an opportunity to apply their developing evaluation skills. Group B.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306; and PSYC 240 or PSYC 305.<br />Introduces the advanced undergraduate to concepts and techniques used in investigations of nervous system function. The laboratory focus is on the measurement of computer-simulated activity, computer applications to neurobiological data analysis, and the presentation of independent student research. Group A.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 250.<br />Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications in the area of human cognition. Topics vary, but include learning, memory, thinking and language processing. Experimental design, measurement, and statistical analyses as they relate to research on human cognition. Group A.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306; PSYC 240 or PSYC 305.<br />Laboratory demonstrations, experiments, and microcomputer applications to the psychophysical and physiological study of sensory systems. The course stresses the research methods and quantitative measures that are used in characterizing sensory processes, especially visual and auditory systems. Group A.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 273.<br />Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of human behavior as a function of the developmental process. Focus is on research within particular developmental stages (e.g., infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood) as well as research examining changes in behavior across ages. Group B.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306, PSYC 275.<br />Lectures, demonstrations, readings, and individual or group research projects illustrating various methods, such as observation, interviewing, archives, standardized tests, and experimentation, are used to learn about topics such as group influences on the individual, attitudes, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and perception of self and others. Group B.

Prerequisite: PSYC 306; PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 recommended.<br />Lectures and laboratory on empirical investigations of aspects of personality. Stress on methodology and selected areas of personality research (e.g., affiliation, the development of personality, self- restraint). Group B.

Nature and causes of maladjustment and mental disorders. History of mental illness, diagnosis, research, and treatment of mental disorders. Group B.

Facts and principles of personality study. Nature of personality, its structure, development, expression, and measurement. Exposition and evaluation of personality study methods with critical review of traditional and modern theories of personality. Group B.

Review of psychological aspects of women&rsquo;s experiences. Topics include psychological aspects of biological events such as menarche, pregnancy, menopause; aspects of women&rsquo;s work and family roles; and mental health issues relevant to women. This course is for anyone who wants to learn about these issues.

Psychological principles and techniques as applied to the development and maintenance of adaptive and growth-enhancing human behavior. Exposure to a variety of change agent methods including anxiety and habit control, social skill training, reinforcement techniques as well as thought pattern modification (through demonstrations and exercises). Applications of those approaches to self-control, individual and group counseling, child and family systems intervention, and organizational design and management.

PSYC 273.<br />Consideration of nature and causes of maladjustment, emotional disorders, and learning disabilities in children in conjunction with approaches to prevention and remediation.

Prerequisite: PSYC 273.<br />Consideration of the important theories and issues within this period of development, such as juvenile delinquency, sex-role identity, and parent and peer group relationships.

Prerequisite: PSYC 273.<br />Overview of theory and research relevant to middle age and aging. Topics include personality, cognitive and social functioning as well as biological functioning. Applications to life situations, such as living arrangements, provision of health services, and retirement, are discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 275.<br />Applications of principles and methods of social psychology to social issues and problems in such areas as: law and justice, health and health care, education, natural and built environments, population, work, life and intergroup relations.

Introduction to the study of consumer behavior. Focus on the psychology of advertising, including (a) advertising techniques effective in influencing consumer attitudes and behavior, and (b) the psychological processes whereby a given advertising technique influences consumer attitudes. Also a focus on consumer decision making: the psychological process whereby consumers arrive at a purchasing decision.

Study of human behavior in work settings. Topics include principles of employee selection, job analysis, motivation and morale, managerial behavior, organization development and socialization, leadership, conflict management, work design and group process.

Prerequisites: PSYC 331 or PSYC 338 recommended<br />Introduction to the principles, theories, and techniques of therapeutic counseling including the clinical interview and use of the case history, individual and group approaches.

Prerequisites: membership in the psychology honors award program or in the college honors program; and approval of the department honors advisor. Directed readings and formal research proposal on a topic of interest to the student and the faculty member with whom he/she has chosen to work. Students are not restricted to working with the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 369.<br />Students carry out the research proposed in PSYC 369 and prepare a formal report constituting the honors thesis. Approval of the thesis by the honors committee earns the psychology honors award. PSYC 370 is a capstone course.

Reviews the overlap between the fields of psychology and law, including such areas as repressed memories, eyewitness testimony, scientific jury selection, insanity defense, crime causation, battered spouse defense, and death-qualified juries.

Health psychology is the field within psychology devoted to understanding psychological and behavioral influences on how people stay healthy, why they become ill, and how they respond when they do become ill. This course offers an overview of this rapidly growing area of psychology. Topics covered include: health behavior and primary prevention, stress and coping, patient-physician interaction, and management of chronic illness. Students will develop a better understanding of the structure of the health care system and the various roles psychologists may play in this system.

Survey of historical, demographical, and statistical aspects of substance abuse. Abuse of alcohol and drugs, as well as eating disorders, may be considered. A variety of theoretical models (e.g., psychopharmacological, personality, psychodynamic, and sociological) are discussed. Individual, milieu, family, group, behavior modification, and drug therapies are described

Prerequisite: PSYC 304 or equivalent social science statistics. Expanded treatment of topics covered in 304 with emphasis on using standard computer analysis packages. No previous computer or programming experience is required.

Prerequisites: BIOL 362 and either PSYC 240 or PSYC 305, or both PSYC 240 and 305 and PSYC 311. The first of two laboratory courses intended for neuroscience minors. The course will cover anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and neurocomputational approaches to the study of the nervous system and the brain. This course will emphasize learning basic neuroscience laboratory techniques.

prerequisites : PSYC 300, PSYC 306, senior psychology major, approval of internship coordinator.<br />After discussion with the internship coordinator, students are placed in relevant work settings. Students contract to work for a minimum of 100 hours in return for supervised training in specified areas. Placements are in mental health, applied developmental and industrial settings. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 392 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.

Prerequisites: PSYC 300, PSYC 306, senior psychology major, approval of internship coordinator.<br />After discussion with the internship coordinator, students are placed in relevant work settings. Students contract to work for a minimum of 100 hours in return for supervised training in specified areas. Placements are in mental health, applied developmental and industrial settings. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 392 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306; senior psychology major; department and instructor permission.<br />An opportunity for students to conduct independent research under the guidance of a psychology faculty member. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 397 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time. Students must arrange supervision with a psychology faculty member, then contact the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes. PSYC 399 and PSYC 397 may not <em>both</em> be counted toward the Psychology major.

Prerequisites: PSYC 306; senior psychology major; department and instructor permission.<br />An opportunity for students to conduct independent research under the guidance of a psychology faculty member. A written research report is required of all students. PSYC 397 is a capstone course; it may be taken only one time. Students must arrange supervision with a psychology faculty member, then contact the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes. PSYC 399 and PSYC 397 may not <em>both</em> be counted toward the Psychology major.

An upper-level, intensive seminar on selected aspects of psychology. The instructor presents an area in which he/she has a special interest and expertise and for which student interest has been expressed. Topics and instructors vary each semester. Recent topics have included Racism and Prejudice, Exercise and Sport Psychology, Children and the Law, Psychology of Religion, Judgment and Decision-Making.

Prerequisites: department and instructor permission.<br />Opportunity for individual reading or research in a specialized area not otherwise covered by the department&rsquo;s course offerings. Students must arrange supervision with a psychology faculty member, then contact the faculty member whose name is listed in the schedule of classes. PSYC 399 and PSYC 397 may not both be counted toward the psychology major.

Loyola

Psychology Department · 1032 W. Sheridan Road · Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3001 · Fax: 773.508.8713

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