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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Philosophy

PHIL 399: Integrative Seminar

PHIL 399: Integrative Seminar

The Generic Catalog Description

Analysis and discussion of special problems found in the various areas of philosophical thought aimed at synthesizing the student's previous philosophic experience. For philosophy majors who have already taken at least five courses in philosophy.


PHIL 399: Integrative Seminar

Ardis Collins

This course aims to give students an experience of philosophy engaged in exposing the hidden complexities and concerns operating in the tensions of our time, and involved in examining the dynamics and principles of certain contemporary movements designed to address these concerns.  The course will focus on the tension between religion and politics in a time when absolute secularism has been seriously challenged by developments in both domestic and international politics.  It will discuss especially the issue of religious diversity and the role of non-religious humanisms dedicated to transcendent human purposes.  This project will bring together different areas of philosophy: ethics, social philosophy, philosophy of religion, with some attention given to philosophy of science and economics.   It will focus especially on two contemporary movements: Douglas Johnston’s Religion and Conflict Resolution Project, which has developed a theory of faith-based diplomacy; Eboo Patel’s Interfaith Youth Core, a Chicago-based international organization dedicated to teaching young people the strategies for interfaith cooperation in social action projects with the hope of producing a new generation of young leaders who can tap the positive, constructive, unifying resources of religious diversity.  The course will probably include an experiential component led by a staff member from the Interfaith Youth Core.


PHIL 399: Integrative Seminar

James Harrington

This is a course about learning to think philosophically about issues of public concern. We will explore two or three issues in depth. We will certainly discuss the possible relationships between science, especially evolutionary theory, and religious belief and practice. In addition, we will explore the serious moral questions surrounding reproductive bio-technology, especially cloning. If we have time, we will also spend some time discussing issues of economic justice and redistribution. In addition to philosophical introductions to the relevant issues, readings will include religious documents, e.g. Catholic encyclicals, court decisions and public policy statements from, for example, various Presidential commissions and politicians. Written work for the course will involve at least two short papers and a term paper.


PHIL 399: Integrative Seminar

Paul Moser

This course is a seminar on the philosophy of religion. It will focus on such topics as the evidence for God, the role of self-examination in philosophy and religion, and the significance of pain and suffering for philosophy of religion. Some of the reading will come from Kierkegaard. Other reading will bear on the theory of knowledge for religion. The course will not presuppose familiarity with the philosophy of religion. It will require a term paper instead of a final exam.



Loyola

Loyola University Chicago · Crown Center, 3rd Floor · 1032 West Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.2291 · Fax: 773.508.2292 · E-mail: Philosophy secretary

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