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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Philosophy

Course Catalog

   

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

PHIL 103. Philosophy and Persons.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 162. Social and Political Philosophy - Service Learning.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 163. Contemporary Ethical Issues - Civic Engagement
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 164. Health Care Ethics - Service Learning.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 167. Environmental Ethics - Service Learning.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 171. Philosophy of Religion.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 172. Metaphysics.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 173. Philosophy of Science.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 174. Logic.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 175. Theory of Knowledge.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 176. Philosophy of Mind.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 177. Aesthetics.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 179. Judgment and Decision Making
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 181. Ethics.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 182. Social and Political Philosophy.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 183. Topics in Ethics.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 184. Healthcare Ethics.
Description forthcoming.

PHIL 185. Business Ethics.
Description forthcoming

PHIL 187. Environmental Ethics.
Description forthcoming

PHIL 188. Culture and Civilization.
Description forthcoming

   PHIL 301. Symbolic Logic.
This course is an introduction to the study of modern symbolic logic, emphasizing formalization and proof construction. The student is introduced to the terminology and chief concepts of modern logic. Outcome: Students will be able to symbolically analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of formal reasoning.

PHIL 302. Topics in Formal Logic.
Selected topic regarding logical theory or metatheory, such as the completeness of formal systems, non-standard logics, computability, foundational issues regarding mathematics. Outcome: Students will develop an advanced understanding of the selected topic in formal logic. Prerequisite: Students must have taken Phil. 301, Symbolic Logic.

PHIL 304. History of Ancient Philosophy. (CLST 304)
This course studies the philosophies of the ancient Greeks, including the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of the ancient Greek philosophers. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 305. Augustine to Abelard. (CATH305) (MTSU 344)
This course studies the philosophies of the major thinkers of the 4th to the 12th centuries, such as Augustine, Scotus, Boethius, Avicenna, Anselm, Abelard. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of the early medieval philosophers. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 306. 19th Century Philosophy.
This course studies 19th century post-Kantian philosophy from idealism toward phenomenology. May include philosophers such as Hegel, Nietzsche, and Husserl. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of 19th century post-Kantian philosophy. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 307. 13th and 14th Century Philosophy. (CATH 307)
This course studies major thinkers of the 13th and 14th centuries, such as Albertus Magnus, Aquinas, Scotus, William of Ockham, Roger Bacon. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of the late medieval philosophers. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 309. Classical Modern Philosophy.
This course studies selected philosophers from the early modern period, such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Berkeley, Kant. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of the early modern philosophers. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 310. Issues in Philosophy of Human Nature.
This course gives intensive consideration to various issues that pertain to being human, such as freedom, determinism, person, society, mind-body, immortality, etc. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers regarding key issues of human nature. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 311. Issues in Metaphysics.
This course studies various philosophical issues regarding the nature of all reality, including existence, causality, relations, abstract entities, purpose, the possibility of knowledge of reality. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers regarding key metaphysical issues. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 312. Problems in Philosophy of God.
This course studies classical and contemporary approaches to knowledge of the existence of God, divine attributes, good and evil, providence and human freedom. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers regarding philosophical views of God. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 318. Philosophy of Art.
Reading and discussion of selected philosophical texts concerning the nature of art and artistic experience. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the nature of art and artistic experience. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 319. Studies in Philosophy and Literature.
This course is a study of selected works of literature and a discussion of philosophical issues in relation to these works. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the nature of literary work, the relations of philosophical and literary language, and methods of interpretation. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 320. The Philosophy of St. Augustine. (CATH 320) (MSTU 346)
This course is a study of the principal works of Augustine, such as the Confessions, City of God. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers found in the works of Augustine. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 321. Ethics and Society.
This course is a study of the rights, duties, and virtues of individuals as members of societies, covering issues such as family and state, social justice, international society, war, and globalization. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding ethics in social contexts. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 322. Philosophical Perspectives on Women. (WOST 322)
Philosophical reflections on being a woman. Topics such as womanhood, representations of women, self-respect, oppression, affirmative action, sexism, and racism. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding conceptions of and experience of being a woman. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 323. Philosophy of Law.
This course pursues a philosophical analysis of law. It deals with topics such as philosophical presuppositions of law, origin and purpose of law, law as social control, current legal problems involving ethical issues. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding law and its applications. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 324. Topics in Ethics.
This course studies a particular topic selected from the field of ethics. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the selected topic. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 326. Political Philosophy.
This course is an examination of the major theories of political society, studying important aspects of political society and their relationships to human nature. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the nature of political society in relation to its members. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 327. Topics in Political Philosophy.
This course will concentrate on a specific issue or issues in political philosophy. Typical topics include civil disobedience, war and peace, political revolution, punishment, and criminal justice. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the selected topic. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 330. Theory of Knowledge.
This course will study major philosophical positions regarding knowledge, belief, thought and language, truth, evidence, reason, perception, skepticsm. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the field of knowledge and related issues. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 333. Language: Theories Ancient and Modern. (LING 333)
Classical, modern, and contemporary philosophical theories on the nature and structure of human language. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate some philosophical problems and answers regarding the nature and structure of human language. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 335. Asian Philosophy. (ASIA 335) (INTS 334) (RCS 335)
A study of fundamental tenets of major Eastern philosophies (Chinese, Japanese, Indian) in comparison to Western tradition. Course may vary in emphasis on particular philosophies and themes. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding Easter philosophical thought. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 340. Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. (MSTU 348)
A study of the philosophy of Thomas Aquinas, including background regarding his life and medieval context. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the thought of Aquinas and its medieval context. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 350. Directed Reading.
Independent research according to program developed jointly by the student and a faculty director. Requires the premission of the selected instructer and the department. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 360. Contemporary European Philosophy.
Readings and discussion drawn from contemporary French and German philosophers, such as Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Heidegger, Derrida, Foucault. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of contemporary French and German philosophy. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 362. The British Philosophers.
Readings and discussion drawn from early modern and modern British philosophers such as Hobbes, Locke, Hutcheson, Hume, Smith, Bentham, Mill. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of early British philosophy. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 369. Philosophy of Medicine.
This course investigates philosophical questions concerning the practice of medicine, such as the epistemology of medicine, the nature of health and disease, what is a profession, and the nature of suffering. Outcome: The student will develop a critical understanding of the practice of medicine from a philosophical point of view. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 370. Introduction to American Philosophy.
This course studies American Philosophers such as Peirce, James, Dewey, with an evaluation of their principles. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers representative of American philosophy. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 374. Philosophy of History.
Study of the nature of historical knowledge and of theories concerning historical process. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers regarding history as a discipline and a historical process. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 375. Philosophy of Marxism. [Previous course number: 394.]
A study of the philosophical dimensions of the thought of Karl Marx, his 19th century precursors and 20th century interpreters. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers to questions regarding the thought of Karl Marx and Marxism. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 380. Topics in Philosophy of Religion. [Previous course number: 391.]
This course studies various philosophical issues regarding religion. May include issues such as religious concepts, types of religion, divine attributes, free will and providence, problem of evil. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate a deeper awareness of the philosophical problems and answers regarding key religious issues. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 381. Philosophy of Science.
Readings and discussion of selected texts regarding theories of scientific methods, scientific reasoning, metaphysical foundations of science, philosophical problems of scientific theories about physical reality. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding scientific inquiry and theory. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 382. Philosophy of Social Science.
Study of philosophical issues in the practice of contemporary behavioral sciences: theory, fact and value, causality, relativism, functionalism, statistical generalization, social planning. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding issues in the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 383. Philosophy of Psychology.
A philosophical analysis of theoretical positions in psychology. May include issues regarding methodology, perception, learning theory, rationality, emotions. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding issues in the field of psychology. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 384. Topics in Philosophy and Science.
Particular topics selected from philosophy and science. Typical topics include the Scientifc Revolution, positivism, space and time, relativity theory, cosmology, evolution. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding the selected topic. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 386. Analytic Philosophy.
A survey of 20th century British and American philosophy in the analytic tradition, including philosophers such as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Quine. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers regarding the analytic tradition in philosophy. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 387. Philosophy of Mind.
This course is a critical study of issues such as the mind-body problem, personal identity, knowledge of other minds, consciousness, perception. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding issues in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 388. History of Ethics.
An intensive study of the ethical theories of several major figures in the history of western moral philosophy, including, for example, the systems of Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of the philosophical problems and answers to questions in the field of ethics by means of this historical study. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 389. Contemporary Issues.
Study of a selected topic in some area of contemporary philosophy. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate the philosophical problems and answers regarding the selected topic. Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least two philosophy courses.

PHIL 390. Independent Study for Majors.
In-depth independent research developed jointly by the student and a faculty director. The topic should be one with which the student has familiarity so that the research can be an in-depth examination of the topic. Outcome: Students will be able to understand and articulate philosophical problems and answers regarding the selected topic. Prerequisite: Students must be a philosohy major with adequate background.

PHIL 395. Seminar in Ancient Philosophy.
This course will study selected issues from ancient philosophy. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of ancient philosophy, through direct student participation in an interactive seminar environment. Prerequisite: Course intended for philosophy majors. Students should have completed at least five philosophy courses, including Phil. 304.

PHIL 396. Seminar in Medieval Philosophy. (CATH 396) (MSTU 350)
This course will study selected issues from ancient philosophy. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of medieval philosophy, through direct student participation in an interactive seminar environment. Prerequisite: Course intended for philosophy majors. Students should have completed at least five philosophy courses, including a course in medieval philosophy.

PHIL 397. Seminar in Classical Modern Philosophy.
This course will study selected issues from early modern philosophy. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of early modern philosophy, through direct student participation in an interactive seminar environment. Prerequisite: Course intended for philosophy majors. Students should have completed at least five philosophy courses, including Phil. 309.

PHIL 398. Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy.
This course will study selected issues in contemporary philosophy. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of contemporary philosophy, through direct student participation in an interactive seminar environment. Prerequisite: Course intended for philosophy majors. Students should have completed at least five philosophy courses.

PHIL 399. Integrative Seminar.
This courses engages the student in an analysis and discussion of special problems found in various areas of philosophy. Outcome: Students will develop a more advanced understanding of the philosophical enterprise, through direct student participation in an interactive seminar environment. Prerequisite: Course intended for philosophy majors. Student should have completed at least five philosophy courses.

   

GRADUATE COURSES

PHIL 400. Philosophical Research Tools

PHIL 401. Plato
This course treats either the early, middle or late dialogues of Plato. In certain cases, Socrates' relation to Plato may be examined. (Ward, Yartz)

PHIL 402. Aristotle
Selected texts from the works of Aristotle are studied. (Ward, Yartz)

PHIL 403. Ancient Philosophy
The emphasis is on areas of ancient philosophy other than Plato and Aristotle. It can focus on figures, such as the Pre-Socratics or Plotinus; on movements such as Stoicism and Neoplatonism; or on topics, such as the nature of the soul or mind, aesthetics, or ethics. (Ward, Yartz)

PHIL 405. Augustine
This course considers either a selection of major texts of Augustine, such as the Confessions, The City of God, or On the Trinity, or topics such as his theory of human nature, the relation of his metaphysics and epistemology, or his philosophy of history. (Dutton, Peperzak)

PHIL 406. Aquinas
This course deals with selected texts and themes from the Thomistic corpus. The major areas from which these are generally chosen are: Aquinas's metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical anthropology, and ethical theory. (Collins, Dutton)

PHIL 407. Medieval Philosophy
This course deals with selected works from such authors as Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham. The course may be on a particular author, or on a theme or issue characteristic of medieval thought. (Collins, Dutton, Miller)

PHIL 410. Descartes
Major texts of Descartes are studied, both in relation to the historical situation, and with a view to Descartes's influence on later western thought. (Dutton, Yandell)

PHIL 411. Classical Rationalism
This course examines details of the attempt of one or more seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza) to show that reason has a priority over sense experience in human knowledge. (Jacobs, Dutton, Yandell)

PHIL 412. Classical Empiricism
This is a course based on texts of one or more of those philosophers (e.g., Locke, Berkeley, Hume) who tried to show that substantive human knowledge originates in sensations. (VanderNat, Waymack, Yandell)

PHIL 415. Kant
The foundations and consequences of Kant's critical philosophy are studied in a reading of the Critique of Pure Reason. (Cutrofello, Peperzak)

PHIL 416. Seventeenth-Eighteenth Century Philosophy
Authors and topics for this course vary. It may focus on a text such as Kant's Critique of Judgement, or it may consider such themes as the relation of philosophy to science, philosophy of language, or the foundations of moral philosophy. (Cutrofello, Peperzak, Thompson, Wike, Yandell)

PHIL 420. Hegel
This course will focus either on specific works (the Phenomenology, Science of Logic, Philosophy of Right, Encyclopedia, etc.) or on specific issues (for example, dialectic, objective idealism, the relation of Hegelian philosophy to other philosophical systems). (Blachowicz, Collins, Miller, Peperzak)

PHIL 421. Marx
Basic texts of Marx (and sometimes Engels) are discussed. Certain Marxists may also be treated, e.g., Lenin, Trotsky, Lukacs, Gramsci, Marcuse, and/or contemporary Marxist theorists. (Ingram, Schweickart)

PHIL 422. Nietzsche
This course is a study of Nietzsche's central ideas, in terms of their origins, development and significance for contemporary philosophy and culture. Focus varies, e.g., the primacy of interest, linguistic indeterminacy and the aesthetic theory of meaning, experimentalism, the question of style, and the human value of science and art. (Ingram, Peperzak, Scott)

PHIL 425. Nineteenth Century Philosophy
Courses offered under this title deal with individual philosophers such as Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Marx, and Engels, as well as overarching themes from this period of European philosophy. (Cutrofello, Miller, Schweickart)

PHIL 430. Husserl
This course focuses on the goals and methods of Husserl's phenomenology as he describes them in Ideas, Cartesian Meditations, and the Crisis of European Sciences. (Peperzak, Jacobs)

PHIL 432. Heidegger
Selected works and topics from the work of Heidegger are treated. (Peperzak)

PHIL 433. Phenomenology/Existentialism
Developments of the phenomenological method of Husserl are studied in the works of such authors as Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. (Jacobs, Peperzak)

PHIL 434. Hermeneutics and Critical Theory
This course may concentrate either on philosophical hermeneutics (e.g., the work of Gadamer, Ricoeur), or critical theory (Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas), or it may survey or select from both traditions. (Ingram, Peperzak, Schweickart)

PHIL 436. Contemporary French Philosophy
Selected texts of Derrida, Levinas, Foucault, Lyotard, Lacan, Deleuze, and others are discussed. (Cutrofello, Huntington, Miller, Peperzak)

PHIL 437. Contemporary German Philosophy
Such contemporary philosophers as Habermas, Gadamer, Luhmann, Apel, and Wellmer are discussed. The course may survey the field or concentrate on one or more thinkers. (Ingram, Peperzak, Schweickart)

PHIL 438. Topics in Continental Philosophy
Topics examined vary; recent topics have been literature, religion, the political sphere, the imagination, and deconstruction. (Cutrofello, Ingram, Miller, Peperzak, Schweickart)

PHIL 440. American Philosophy
This course is concerned with developments in American philosophy, for example, the writings of William James, Dewey, C.S. Pierce, and Whitehead. (Thompson)

PHIL 441. Wittgenstein
Readings from the early, middle, and late writings of Wittgenstein will be analyzed in the context of his place and influence in modern Anglo-American philosophy. (Moser)

PHIL 442. Anglo-American Philosophy
This course may focus upon the contributions of major figures such as Frege, Russell, Moore, and Quine; on major trends and issues such as logical positivism or empiricism; or on issues which combine discussions of problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and moral philosophy. (Moser, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 443. Anglo-American Epistemology
This course focuses on prominent topics and problems in theory of knowledge: for example, the nature of justified belief, the problem of skepticism, the possibility of naturalized epistemology, the goals of an analysis of knowledge, and the philosophical importance of meta-epistemology. (Moser, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 444. Studies in Logic
The course varies in content. Possible offerings include formal systems, axiomatic set theory, mathematical logic, modal logic, tense logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic, formal semantics, or philosophical logic. (VanderNat)

PHIL 445. Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Mind explores issues relating to the nature of mind and the nature and function of various types of mental states. (Blachowicz, Moser, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 446. Philosophy of Perception
The course explores a number of epistemological and ontological issues relating to perception: the possible roles of inference and belief; the argument from illusion; the "given"; the nature of the perceived object of mental representation, etc. (Blachowicz, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 447. Issues in Cognitive Science
This course focuses on philosophical issues arising from the cognitive sciences: the nature of mental representation, the possibility of artificial intelligence, the significance of innate intellectual factors to cognition, or the role of concepts and language in perceptual awareness. (Blachowicz, Moser, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 449. Philosophy of Language
Theories concerning the relationship among language, thought, meaning, and reality. Specific topics and approaches will vary. (Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 450. Epistemology
This course may deal with topics in epistemology ranging over both historical and contemporary figures, or continental and Anglo-American or other approaches. (Blachowicz, Moser, Peperzak, Trout, VanderNat)

PHIL 451. Metaphysics
This course may be an account of a metaphysical system or a survey of such systems. It may be an examination of issues such as causality or substance, or an examination of the question of the legitimacy and nature of metaphysical thinking. (Blachowicz, Peperzak, Trout, Yandell)

PHIL 452. Philosophy of Science
Topics treated under this heading vary. The course may deal with theories of inference, of theoretical explanation, or of observation with more specialized topics such as confirmation theory, the problems of a logic of discovery, or the relation between history and philosophy of science. (Blachowicz, Mueller, Trout)

PHIL 454. Philosophy of Religion
This course investigates issues encountered in our attempt to understand God and the phenomenon of religion. Topics may include proofs of God's existence, God's attributes, our knowledge of and language about God, and the problem of reconciling evil with belief in God. (Miller, Moser, Thompson, Yandell)

PHIL 457. Aesthetics
Art and the aesthetic, theories of value and evaluation, the status of art works, and the nature of criticism are some of the topics to be analyzed in this course through readings in the history of aesthetics and contemporary literature. (Cutrofello, Peperzak)

PHIL 459. Philosophy of Law
This course will examine theories of the nature of law and of the basis of legal obligation, and a selection of related topics such as civil disobedience and conscientious refusal, the legislation of morality, theories of the moral justification of punishment, and ethical issues in the legal profession. (Malm, Ozar, Wren)

PHIL 462. Kant's Moral Philosophy
This course is an examination of Kant's moral philosophy. It is based on such texts as the Critique of Practical Reason and the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, and considers the situation of the moral theory within Kant's critical theory, as well as the foundations of morality. (Peperzak, Wike, Yandell)

PHIL 463. Virtue Ethics
Classical texts and contemporary commentary on the virtue tradition in moral philosophy are discussed. (Waymack, Wren)

PHIL 464. Utilitarianism
This course will examine a selection of classic texts in the utilitarian tradition, as well as the work of recent theorists, considering utilitarianism as an option in moral philosophy. Applications to contemporary issues will also be studied. (Carson, Ozar, Wren)

PHIL 466. Major Authors in Moral Philosophy
Major figures in the history of ethics are studied. Some particular period in history or some particular focus may be emphasized. (Carson, Ozar, Peperzak, Schweickart, Waymack)

PHIL 467. Contemporary Ethical Theories
Works of contemporary moral philosophers in the analytic or continental traditions are examined and compared. (Carson, Malm, Miller, Ozar, Waymack)

PHIL 468. Topics in Ethics
(Staff)

PHIL 469. Ethics & Rationality
This course investigates the relationship between rationality and moral thinking, including its normative and formal dimensions. (Carson, Moser)

PHIL 470. Ethics and Economic Justice
This course investigates questions of ethics as they relate to economic practice and theory, including the distribution of economic goods in a market economy and the structure of economic organizations. (Carson, Schweickart)

PHIL 471. Principles of Healthcare Ethics
This course covers basic ethical approaches to issues such as genetic engineering, abortion, and death and dying. (Ozar, Waymack, Wike)

PHIL 472. Clinical Healthcare Ethics
This course covers ethical issues involved in the practice of the medical arts such as informed consent, confidentiality, and patient/healthcare work relationships. (Ozar, Parks, Waymack)

PHIL 473. Social Healthcare Ethics
This covers issues such as allocation of funds, hospital management, and ethical review boards. (Malm, Ozar, Parks, Waymack)

PHIL 474. Principles of Business Ethics
This course will examine some of the philosophical, psychological, and organizational foundations of topics in ethics in business. Topics to be analyzed include the nature of an organization and its moral responsibilities; roles and role responsibilities in employment; moral rights, utility, and cost/benefit analysis and justice. (Carson, Gini)

PHIL 475. Philosophy of the Nursing Profession (GNUR 540)
This course addresses such questions as the meaning of nursing as a profession, the nature and key features of a profession, the nature, function, and implications of professional obligation, and the specific contents and implications of nurses's professional obligations. Team taught with a member of the nursing faculty. (Ozar, Waymack)

PHIL 480. Social and Political Philosophy
This course examines such topics as theories of justice, the nature of the state, critiques and justifications of economic systems, the status of human rights, conceptions of liberty and democracy, the rationale for punishment, and issues of race, gender, and class. (Carson, Ingram, Malm, Ozar, Schweickart, Wren)

PHIL 481. Philosophy of Action
This course focuses on a topic in action theory variously called “personal autonomy” or “free agency.”  The core questions this topic raises include:  (1) What is required for a person’s conduct to be genuinely her/his own?  (2) What is involved in having control over your life?  These are important issues in everyday life and are of special relevance to the concept of informed consent in bioethics. 

PHIL 482. Philosophy of Social Science
The course will focus on an examination of some of the important concepts in the social sciences, including objectivity, fact, value, "causality," or "freedom," "theory," etc. (Ingram, Ozar, Schweickart, Trout, Wren)

PHIL 484. Philosophical Anthropology
This course will explore theories of human nature, and issues such as the nature of human culture and civilization, freedom, political action, etc. Such theories could include religious views, Marxist views, "existentialist" views, and psychoanalytical views. (Blachowicz)

PHIL 490. Current Philosophical Issues (Staff)

PHIL 500. Directed Readings & Research

PHIL 501. Directed Readings & Research

PHIL 505. Teaching Internship
Students are introduced to teaching by assisting faculty mentors with tasks traditionally associated with teaching: designing a course syllabus, preparing assigned texts and bibliography, leading class discussion, lecturing, paper grading, and academic counseling. (Staff)

PHIL 510. Clinical Ethics Practicum
This is an in-service guided program, dealing with ethical issues affecting actual patients. Enrollment limited to two to four students. (Ozar, Parks, Waymack)

PHIL 550. Integrative Seminar
This is the concluding course for the M.A. in social philosophy. It will require both a theoretical analysis and evaluation of social structures and an application of such analysis to students' fieldwork. This integrative project will issue in a written paper for presentation and discussion in a public colloquium. (Staff)

PHIL 595. Thesis Supervision

PHIL 600. Dissertation Supervision

PHIL 605. Master's Study

PHIL 610. Doctoral Study



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