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Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Advanced Writing and Research

Skills

Intended for those interested in sharpening their legal research skills. In addition to reviewing basic legal research, the course covers federal and Illinois legislative history, administrative research, looseleaf services, litigation materials and other research sources, using both traditional materials and computerized resources when appropriate. The student is expected to complete a series of weekly library exercises, and one or more extended research projects or writing assignments. The number and subject of the research projects will be determined by the instructor, as will the option of requiring a midterm exam. (Grant, LeBaron, Scott, Yelin)

Skills

This course gives students an understanding of where administrative authority originates in the United States and how to find it in its various forms, including: constitutions, enabling statutes, agency regulations and policy, agency and court decisions, and executive orders. Attention is given to legislative history, statutes, and case law as necessary components of researching administrative law. Students will explore specific federal and state sources of administrative law; learn about the rulemaking process; research regulations, agency cases, and other administrative law using a variety of print and online sources. Students in the course are not at any disadvantage if they have not yet taken Administrative Law (Law 221).

Skills

This course is designed to meet the growing demand for research competency in the fields of foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL). Students in the class will be introduced to research techniques and resources specific to these fields that will be useful in practice and academic settings. Print and electronic resources will both be discussed, but emphasis will be placed on resources in electronic format. Resources on the WWW and at Loyola will be highlighted, although students will have an opportunity to explore the international and foreign holdings of another local law library. Weekly research exercises and a final project will allow students to apply specific FCIL sources.

Skills

This one-credit class will introduce students to the structure of Illinois law and sources for researching Illinois law.  The class will focus upon “cost effective” legal research; to that end, students will learn about print and free online resources in addition to commercial databases.  The class will consist of weekly readings and lectures/demonstrations.  Grades will be based upon class attendance and participation, weekly quizzes and short assignments, and a final project/presentation to be determined.  There will not be a comprehensive final exam. (Keefe)

Skills

The Advanced Legal Research–Special Topics course on intellectual property is a one credit course exploring how to research patent, trademark, copyright, trade secret, right of publicity, and other areas of intellectual property law.  The course covers the following resources and topics, with an emphasis on intellectual property: treatises and other secondary sources, statutes, legislative history, case law, digests, regulations, agency publications, state law, international law, efficient and effective online searching, and research strategy.

Skills

Learning litigation skills task-by-task can leave the young practitioner with little guidance on how to form the overall strategy necessary to develop and present an effective civil case. While covering a wide range of specific skills, including final pretrial preparation, the pretrial uses of opening statement and closing argument, the careful researching of local rules of procedure, techniques for examining witnesses, emphasis in the use of discovery tools, techniques for oral argument and applying a structured approach to settlement negotiations, this course will emphasize the aspects of these skills that support an overall civil litigation strategy. This course will require students to review a variety of materials in preparation for class, to participate in certain in-class exercises and to submit certain written work during the course of the term. Evaluation of each student's performance will be based on in-class exercises and written work during the course of the term. (Herbert)

Skills

This course emphasizes and builds effective writing and communications skills in the transactional, business practice setting. The course will focus on a range of formal and informal documents and communication formats: drafting contract provisions and letters to clients and counterparties in transactional and pre-contentious settings; reviewing, interpreting, and editing the (often imperfect) contracts submitted by opposing counsel; preparing transaction task lists, due diligence memoranda or other internal communications for use by colleagues; and presentations to a board of directors or other client audience supported by written materials including PowerPoint visuals with substantive content and impact. Some attention will be given to ethics and professionalism in written content, including in the context of engagement letters with clients, declination letters with prospective clients, and conflict waivers among clients. Several sessions will also focus on special considerations when working and communicating with clients and counterparties in or from other countries where the laws, customs, practices, and language are different from our own. In-class sessions will typically be used for lecture and discussion to develop concepts and facts from selected readings and materials, which students will then incorporate in brief written assignments before the next class. Students will be graded based on written assignments and exercises and class participation. (Hagy)
 

Skills

This course focuses on writing assignments that traditionally arise in the course of civil litigation. It is designed to develop and enhance the art of precise and focused writing. With a fact pattern drawn from an actual case, students will draft and answer pleadings, discovery and dispositive motions. The course will also address client communications, settlement and litigation alternatives. Class time will be a mixture of lecture, class discussion, exercises and guest speakers. (Gilbert, Legner, Mason)

Skills

This specialized writing course will focus on the writing and drafting skills that nearly all attorneys require, particularly those entering the world of litigation. Students will learn how to draft and answer complaints, interrogatories, requests to produce, Motions to Dismiss, Motions for Summary Judgment, and other frequently utilized motions. This class is intended to give students a greater understanding of the practical and theoretical import of drafting pleadings and written discovery, including the eventual effect these documents have at trial. Students take what they learn in theory and immediately put it into practice, learning from actual complaints, answers, motions, and written discovery. The emphasis will be on Illinois Civil Procedure rules. 40% of the grade in this course is based on class participation. 60% is based on a written assignments. (Caldwell)

Text: Course packet prepared by Professor Caldwell.

Skills

This course takes students through the progression of a federal criminal case from indictment to sentencing, and gives students an understanding of what kind of written advocacy is common at each stage of the case. Students will be given practical guidance for writing persuasively at each of those stages. With fact patterns drawn from actual federal criminal cases, students will hone their skills by writing various motions and a sentencing memorandum, from the side of either the prosecution or the defense. Students will present oral argument on one of the written assignments. Students will also observe a federal court proceeding relevant to the topics covered in class.

Skills

The course is designed to expose the student to the arc of an employment case – from demand letter through summary judgment ruling, from both the plaintiff and defense perspective. Students will have the opportunity to draft a variety of documents typical in an employment case, alternating between documents submitted by the plaintiff and those submitted by the defense.

In addition to providing students with experience drafting practical documents, the course will focus on the procedural mechanics and strategies of litigating an employment case, as well as on substantive employment law topics.

Skills

This course focuses on the development of skills necessary for particular writing assignments that arise in the course of a civil lawsuit or a criminal prosecution. While writing well in litigation is important in itself, it also contributes to a litigator’s skill as an oral advocate. Moreover, practice in oral advocacy contributes to a litigator’s effectiveness as a writer. For this reason, this course will require the student to participate in oral advocacy exercises as well as undertake specific writing assignments.

The course is designed the student with a strong sense of the overall strategy necessary to be effective in the development and presentation of a case. It will cover a wide range of skills, including the drafting of complaints, the preparation and presentation of motions, opening statements and closing arguments, the careful researching of local rules, the drafting of memoranda, the development of techniques for examining witnesses, the use of discovery tools and the application of a structured approach to settlement negotiations. In addition to the writing associated with these skills, the course will focus on the aspects of these skills that support an overall litigation strategy. (Herbert)

Skills

This course will give students a practical introduction to the type of work that legal aid attorneys perform by following the progression of a case from intake through a dispositive motion. Students will be asked to draft pleadings, discovery and motions to gain an understanding of what kind of advocacy is common at each stage of the litigation. Students will also participate in a mock hearing on their final motion. 

Skills

This course will address advanced legal writing issues that extend beyond drafting legal briefs and memoranda to prepare the student for common legal writing assignments involving correspondence and e-mail.

Specifically, this course will address professional e-mail etiquette, the analytical e-mail in comparison to the formal legal memorandum, productive communications with opposing counsel (including maintaining civility and professional decorum), and preserving client interests in dealing with non-parties. 

Skills

This course will focus on the legal and practical issues arising from SEC Enforcement actions and the resulting litigation, with a focus on advanced legal writing. Subject areas will include: the role of the SEC in enforcing compliance with the federal securities laws; investigative tools and techniques; common types of securities fraud investigations; remedies available to the SEC; the preparation for and filing of an SEC Enforcement case in federal district court; current issues and cases relating to SEC Enforcement; and parallel Department of Justice criminal prosecutions of white collar crime. Basic familiarity with the securities laws is presumed. Students will be required, among other things, to conduct an insider trading investigation, draft an Action Memorandum seeking Commission authority to file an action in federal court, draft a complaint and other pleadings, conduct a deposition, make a presentation to the class, discuss reading assignments in class, and actively participate in class discussions. 

Skill


This is an advanced writing course offering students an opportunity to continue developing their writing and analytical skills while focusing on the legal issues that arise between the holders of valid trademarks and copyrights and those who infringe upon their rights using a practical approach of replicating the litigation process. Topics covered include the remedies found in the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1114, et seq, and the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 501, et seq, as well as the growing complications presented by global demand and the internet. The course also focuses on the perspectives of those innocent or non-willful infringers in deciding when and how to best protect and advance the client's interests. Students will study examples of registration applications and other related documents, as well as analyze case law as they vigorously represent clients in federal court.


Knowledge of trademark and copyright principles would assist the student; however, the Intellectual Property survey course is not a requirement.

JD Required

This course focuses on persuasive written and oral communication skills which are necessary for critical analysis and the competent representation of all clients. Students will explore all sides of an argument, provide evaluations of the merits of particular cases, and persuade the reader/listener of the student's position. Pre-requisites: successful completion of Legal Writing I and II. (Brendel, Perlin and the Advocacy faculty)

Skills

This course will give students practical experience with common pre-trial civil litigation tasks they will encounter in private practice. The instructor's principal goal is to expose students to the "nuts and bolts" of pleading, discovery and fact gathering - with particular emphasis on writing - so that they will be more effective junior lawyers on their first day of practice. Throughout the semester, each student will represent a client in simulated litigation of a fictional civil case in which one of their classmates is opposing counsel. Class time is devoted to discussing how to prepare and complete the tasks that arise litigation generally and in the mock litigation in particular. As a result, students become familiar with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and obtain actual, albeit simulated, experience drafting pleadings, discovery and other writings. Specifically, this course will address: (i) conducting factual investigations preceding and during litigation; (ii) drafting initial pleadings, such as complaints, answers, affirmative defenses and counterclaims; (iii) drafting and responding to written discovery requests; (iv) locating and producing documents/electronically-stored information, as well as the practical considerations pertaining thereto; (v) preparing for depositions of corporate representatives under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(6); (vi) handling discovery disputes; and (vii) negotiating and drafting settlement agreements. The instructor stresses both the requirements of the applicable procedural rules as well as more subjective topics such as civility when dealing with opposing counsel, courtroom demeanor and interaction with clients and more senior attorneys. (Banich)

Argument and persuasion are essential human activities. Both have been practiced, in one form or another, for as long as human beings have interacted with each other; both have also been the subject of study since earliest times. Much of what guides us today comes to us from the ancient Greeks, but modern cognitive psychology also contributes to our understanding as how audiences of various types are persuaded in various circumstances. This course is particularly interested in what constitutes effective legal argument, particularly in the resolution of constitutional questions by appellate courts. The first part of the course will consider the general problem of persuasion by focusing on classical theories of argument and, to some extent, on the understanding of effective persuasion derived from contemporary cognitive psychology. Since the aim of appellate advocacy is to persuade a particular and specialized audience, namely, appellate judges, the second part of the course will consider the particular demands and requirements of persuasion that arise in that context by considering scholarly works relevant to that subject. We will consider what judges and theorists of judging say that judges do, or think they are doing, when they interpret the U.S. Constitution or resolve other questions of law through interpretation. We will also consider how an understanding of these matters impacts upon what lawyers can or should do in framing their arguments. In the final part of the course, students will apply the knowledge they have gained in the first two parts of the course by studying the opinions, briefs, and oral argument transcripts in selected Supreme Court cases. The selected cases will present distinct problems in advocacy. Students will be asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the arguments actually made in the cases and consider whether other arguments might more profitably have been made. Papers will be required. (Sullivan)

Bar
Non-Graded

This class is designed to help students develop writing skills that are essential for success on the essay portion of Bar Examination. It is structured as an intensive, interactive writing workshop. The class is offered for one ungraded credit.

Bar
Non-Graded

The Bar Exam Writing Skills courses focus on refining your memorization, analytical and writing skills - all skills that are necessary for the bar exam. Whether you need practice writing essays or synthesizing the facts and law and producing a legal work product, these courses will help you master your test-taking skills.

This course counts as a Non-Graded Course.

Students may earn up to three hours of credit by working on a targeted ChildLaw research project. The scope and subject are chosen with the guidance of a ChildLaw faculty member who directs the students. Student who wishes to register for a directed study must first contact a ChildLaw Faculty member to discuss an individual research project. (ChildLaw Faculty)

Students are expected to complete either a thesis or capstone project of substantial depth that explores a specific area of children’s law and policy and that integrates subject matter and/or leadership skills learned in the M.J. curriculum. The project is completed in close cooperation with a faculty advisor. Students are required to present their thesis or capstone project to faculty and fellow students during their graduation (Educational Immersion) weekend.

Skills

Non-Graded

A student may earn up to two units of ungraded credit for undertaking a research project for a faculty member. The scope and subject is chosen by the faculty member, who exercises control over the project. It is expected that for each hour of academic credit the student will engage in substantial legal work for at least sixty (60) hours during the semester. The project that is the subject of the Directed Study must be completed during the semester in which the registration occurs. (For additional requirements see the associate dean.) Click here to download the Directed Study approval forms. (Adobe PDF)

Non-Graded

Open to: SJD and DLaw students only. Prerequisites: none. Candidates will be required to rework the doctoral proposal s/he submitted with his/her admission application into a 30-40 page summary paper which shall serve as a roadmap for the first draft of the dissertation. Students must also make a presentation on an aspect of their research to a group of doctoral students and advisors. (Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to: SJD and DLaw students only. Prerequisites: Doctoral Dissertation Research I. Candidates must draft a detailed dissertation outline, have it evaluated by his/her advisor, and incorporate any necessary changes into a final outline. Once the dissertation outline is approved, the first draft of the dissertation should be completed and submitted to the advisor. (Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to: SJD and DLaw students only. Prerequisites: Doctoral Dissertation Research I and II, Bibliography Tutorial. The dissertation advisor will work with the candidate to form a doctoral committee comprised of the advisor and two outside readers.  (In the case of foreign students, one outside reader may be sufficient.) The committee will assist the student by consulting on dissertation substantive issues, reviewing the working draft and approving the final product.   Dissertations should represent important contributions to the field, (minimum length 150 pages and double spaced) but specific format and content needs to be clarified between the candidate, the advisor, and the committee. Once clarified, the suggested format must be followed. Once the dissertation has been completed, it must be presented at an open forum to be attended by interested members of the law school community.  Students must enroll in this course during both fall and spring semesters of his/her second year. (Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to: LLM, MJ, SJD, and DLaw students. Prerequisites: none. LLM, MJ, SJD, and DLaw students may earn credit for participation in a targeted research tutorial. The scope and subject are chosen with the guidance of a faculty member who directs the students. (JD students can research in the health law field, but must register for the JD Directed Study.)  (Singer, Blum)

Non-Graded

With the consent of a faculty member supervising the research, a student may earn one or two units of ungraded credit. The scope and subject is arranged between the student and the faculty member. It is expected that for each hour of academic credit the student will produce a scholarly work of publishable quality of approximately 30 pages in length. The project that is the subject of the Independent Research must be completed during the semester in which the registration occurs. (For additional requirements see the associate dean.)

Non-Graded

This course provides an overview of the legal research process. The student will learn basic legal research skills with a focus on online legal sources. Students will search for health law cases, statutes, regulations and law journal articles. They will learn how to use citators to verify that a case or statute is still good law and also learn the proper form for citation of legal authorities. (MJ only or with permission.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

This foundational course introduces students to the sources and functions of law in our society. The course begins with an explanation of the structure of the American court system. Students then learn to read and brief cases, synthesize cases, and develop basic legal writing and analysis skills. Through multiple short writing assignments, students learn to construct a legal office memorandum, the final course requirement. The course utilizes health law cases and problems and provides students with background for future health law studies. (MJ only or with permission.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

JD Required

Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations. Through a series of legal memoranda writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills. Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures. Second semester, the course builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills students have learned first semester and introduces persuasive writing skills. Students also learn how to present an oral argument to the court. Computerized research techniques are included in the course. In order to provide significant opportunities for instructor feedback, the first-year writing classes are organized into sections of approximately twelve students. Each section is staffed by both a legal writing instructor and a student tutor. (Brendel, Perlin and the Legal Writing Faculty)

JD Required

Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations. Through a series of legal memoranda writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills. Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures. Second semester, the course builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills students have learned first semester and introduces persuasive writing skills. Students also learn how to present an oral argument to the court. Computerized research techniques are included in the course. In order to provide significant opportunities for instructor feedback, the first-year writing classes are organized into sections of approximately twelve students. Each section is staffed by both a legal writing instructor and a student tutor. (Brendel, Perlin and the Legal Writing Faculty)

This course is required for international students in the LL.M. in U.S. Law or the LL.M. in International Law.

During the fall semester, students take Legal Research and Writing I and are introduced to legal research methods and the fundamentals of legal writing.  Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations.  Through a series of legal memoranda and exam writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills.   Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures.  During the spring semester, students take Legal Research and Writing II which builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills learned in the first semester.  In the spring semester, students are also introduced to persuasive writing and learn how to present an oral argument to the court.   Computerized research techniques are included in the course.

This course is required for international students in the LL.M. and U.S. Law or the LL.M. in International Law.

During the fall semester, students take Legal Research and Writing I and are introduced to legal research methods and the fundamentals of legal writing.  Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply the legal authorities to particular fact situations.  Through a series of legal memoranda and exam writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills.  Students are taught legal research methods through written exercises, research memos, and lectures.  During the spring semester, students take Legal Research and Writing II which builds on the basic writing, analysis, and research skills learned in the first semester.  In the spring semester, students are also introduced to persuasive writing and learn how to present an oral argument to the court.   Computerized research techniques are included in the course.

Fundamentals of Private Practice is a three-day course geared toward training students in the personal skills, practical skills and business sense required to succeed in a private practice law firm. On the first day of the course, students will acquire general practice skills relevant to all new lawyers – from office demeanor to managing workload to daily verbal and written skills. On the second day, students will be divided into litigation and transactional sections, depending on practice areas of interest. The litigation section will focus on the fundamentals of litigation practice, including research, writing and advocacy skills. The transactional section will focus on the fundamentals of transactional practice, including corporate formation, corporate transactions and associate due diligence. Both sections will culminate in a practical skills assignment, to be completed in advance of the third day of the course. On the third day, the assignments will be reviewed in detail. Students will also learn basic ethical considerations and the skills learned throughout the weekend will be put into practice.

Non-Graded

Professor Geraghty 3 credits
In order to receive the LL.M. degree, each student must write a paper of publishable quality. The paper, written under the guidance of an LL.M. faculty advisor, should integrate a number of issues covered in the ChildLaw curriculum. Each paper is expected to make an important contribution to the literature on child and family law. (Geraghty)

Non-Graded

Professor Geraghty 3 credits
LL.M. students who do not complete the LL.M. Paper within the requisite period of time must register for this class each semester until the paper has been accepted by the advisor. (Geraghty)

Open to: LLM students. Prerequisites: none. Each LLM student must write a paper of publishable quality. The paper, written under the guidance of a faculty advisor, should integrate a number of issues covered in the health law curriculum. It is expected that each LL.M. paper will make an important contribution to health law literature. (Singer, Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to:  LLM students only with permission. LLM students who do not complete the LL.M. Paper within the requisite period of time must register for this class each semester until the paper has been accepted by the advisor. (Singer, Blum)

Non-Graded

Open to: LL.M. students only. This course is intended for those students interested in sharpening their tax legal research skills. In addition to reviewing basic tax research, the course covers federal legislative history, administrative research, tax looseleaf services, and other specialized tax research sources, using both traditional materials and computerized resources when appropriate such as the online versions of CCH and RIA. The student is expected to complete a series of weekly library exercises. (Johnson)

Open to: M.J. students only. This course introduces legal research methods and principles of legal writing in the first semester of the program. Through a series of exercises on relevant topics, students will refine their writing skills. By researching and writing on varied issues, students learn to apply legal research techniques. Students read and analyze legal authority and learn how to apply legal authorities to particular fact situations. Through a series of legal memoranda writing assignments, students develop their analytical and writing skills. Computerized research techniques are included in the course.

Students are expected to complete a thesis project of substantial depth that explores a specific area of health law and integrates a number of legal subjects covered in the M.J. curriculum. The project is completed in close cooperation with a faculty advisor. Students are required to present their thesis to faculty and fellow students during graduation weekend. (MJ only.) THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Students will review basic writing mechanics including grammar and punctuation. They will enhance their writing skills by editing passages, producing written assignments, and doing focused writing exercises. Students will also learn to develop sound arguments by practicing the art of logical flow. The goal is to help students to produce clear, well-organized, grammatically correct prose. This course will also focus on how to approach the master's thesis. THIS CLASS IS ONLY AVAILABLE ONLINE AND WITH PERMISSION.

Loyola

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