Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Registrar

School of Law

Public Interest Courses

Skills

Perspective Elective

Experiential Learning

Access to Health Care is a seven-week course exploring the legal, political, environmental, financial and medical issues surrounding access to health in the United States and internationally, with particular emphasis on people who are experiencing poverty and the uninsured. The course is complemented with a required spring break field study to an impoverished region in the United States or abroad. 

This course examines the rules by which federal administrative agencies operate, including the source of administrative authority and procedures governing the exercise of that authority, and considers problems of delegation, agency, rulemaking, adjudication and enforcement powers, judicial review of administrative action, and due process requirements.

This course focuses on the roles of federal and state agencies and government branches in regulating health care.  Students will learn the fundamentals of administrative law through a health care lens.  Topics covered will include government rulemaking, investigations, and enforcement.  Students will learn how to locate and understand the interplay of sources of administrative law and analyze statutes and regulations. (Meites)

Skills

This is a seminar course which will give the student an overview and basic understanding of the fundamental legal principles of adoption. A different adoption topic will be covered every week, including the different types of adoption, for example, domestic, international, special needs, co-parent adoptions. Social and financial aspects of adoption will be presented. Issues in reproductive technology will also be discussed including donor gametes (egg and sperm donation) and embryo donation. Students will write a paper on a topic provided by the instructor. (Bush-Joseph)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Students who have successfully completed the Health Justice Project clinic may enroll in the Advanced Health Justice course, in which they will continue to represent clients and complete projects responsive to the needs identified during their clinical experience.  Faculty permission required.

Skills

This course will give students a practical introduction to the type of work that legal aid attorneys perform by following the progression of a case from intake through a dispositive motion. Students will be asked to draft pleadings, discovery and motions to gain an understanding of what kind of advocacy is common at each stage of the litigation. Students will also participate in a mock hearing on their final motion. 

Skills

Class focus will be on mediation, arbitration and other forms of Alternative Dispute Resolution, with an emphasis on learning procedural aspects of mediation and arbitration, as well as negotiation skills. This course will provide students with the opportunity to gain practical knowledge and familiarity with the different methods of alternatives to litigation. Classes will include lectures, simulations, role-playing, and outcome-based actual case studies. (Moritz)(Roethke)

This course will provide a comprehensive survey of basic bankruptcy law. We will devote roughly equal time to consumer bankruptcy and business bankruptcy. Throughout the course, we will touch on the economic, political, and ethical issues underlying bankruptcy's competing goals: providing overextended consumer and business debtors with a fresh start and satisfying creditors' claims in an orderly, fair way. There are no prerequisites. Students' grades will be based on classroom participation and a take-home final exam.(Krivinskas-Shepard)

This course will provide a comprehensive survey of basic bankruptcy law. There are no prerequisites. Students' grades will be based on a take-home final exam.(Rosenberg)

Experiential Learning

Skills

The Business Law Clinic (the "Clinic") represents entrepreneurs and community members who, respectively, wish assistance in forming small businesses and not-for-profit corporations in the Chicagoland area. Students typically work with several Clinic clients during the course of a semester, under the supervision of at least one member of the Clinic's faculty. The Clinic also includes a weekly seminar (Tuesdays from 5 to 7 p.m.), which addresses relevant substantive law, ethical issues and pragmatic lawyering skills, such as drafting, negotiating and counseling clients. The work in the Clinic is transactional in nature. The Clinic does not handle litigation matters.

Participation in the Clinic requires both a significant time commitment (a minimum of 6 hours per week, in addition to the time in the seminar), as well as a certain degree of flexibility in the student's schedule. All students are expected to have an initial meeting with their clients and to meet with them thereafter, as needed. In addition, the students are expected to communicate with their clients regularly, efficiently and effectively perform the related transactional work under the supervision of the Clinic's faculty, maintain their client's files in an organized and professional manner, regularly attend the seminar classes and participate in various seminar exercises.

Prerequisite for the course is Business Organizations. Federal Income Tax is highly recommended. Other recommended courses, in order of preference, are Corporate & Partnership Tax, Sales, and Securities Regulation. Class is limited to 10-14 students and instructor permission and an application is required. (Stone)

Skills

Experiential Learning  

This course will explore the use of mediation in disputes involving children and families. Students will survey various models and uses of mediation and related dispute resolution processes in the following contexts: divorce, custody and visitation issues; child protection; juvenile delinquency; balanced and restorative justice; adult guardianships; youth violence prevention and peer mediation; and special education. Further, students will consider the impact of domestic violence and other impairments on the child and family mediation process. In addition to reviewing basic mediation skills, students will participate in classroom exercises designed to develop their ability to think critically about issues, as well as apply mediation strategies to dispute resolution scenarios. (Levitz, Nathanson)

Non-Graded
Skills

This seminar serves as a capstone opportunity for ChildLaw Fellows to contextualize their interdisciplinary legal education and to explore their roles as advocates in working in and reforming the complex and evolving systems that affect children and their families. (Geraghty)

This course counts as an Experiential Learning and a Skills course.

The ChildLaw Legislation and Policy Clinic is part of the Civitas ChildLaw Center. Students in this Clinic have an opportunity to work, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a legislative or policy project that may involve any or all of the following: critiquing pending bills or existing legislation, drafting bills, developing summaries and fact sheets about pending bills, and building and working with coalitions to develop legislative ideas and consensus. Topics cover a range of child and family issues. Spring semester students primarily work on projects begun during the Fall Clinic, including researching and drafting legislation concerning child protection and juvenile justice reform issues. Students work in teams and must have sufficient time or flexibility during the work day to participate in some internal team meetings as well as attend meetings outside the Law School, as needed. Instructor permission required. Class hours TBD. (Weinberg)

Experiential Learning

Skills

This is Trial Practice I with an emphasis on those issues important to advocating in cases involving children (child witnesses, unique problems in expert testimony, special evidentiary issues, etc.). The course is taught by a team of lawyers, judges, and medical and mental health professionals with a student/faculty ratio of 8 to 1. The principal objective is to introduce students to litigation principles, and to teach them advocacy skills in an intensive learn by doing environment. By grounding the exercises in child advocacy problems, a further goal is to prepare students for the special challenges involved in the representation of children. At the end of the course, the student conducts a complete trial at the Richard J. Daley Center. (Geraghty)

Perspective Elective
Skills

This course examines the legal relationships among children, family and the state, primarily in the context of issues over which juvenile courts traditionally have jurisdiction. The subject matter is divided into two sections, the first dealing with the constitutional and statutory rights of juveniles involved in the criminal justice system and the second focusing on civil matters including neglect, abuse, termination of parental rights, adoption, and children's right to treatment issues. (Burns, Coupet, Geraghty)

Experiential Learning
Perspective Elective
Skills

This intensive, week long seminar provides a wide-ranging interdisciplinary exploration of critical issues affecting children. A diverse team of faculty offers interdisciplinary perspectives on the meaning of "best interests of the child" particularly as it relates to balancing legislative mandates and "best interests." Experts from history, political science, psychology, social work, law, education, and medicine present information, participate in discussion with the attendees, and debate the issues from the perspectives of their own professions. Faculty provide both a theoretical framework for examining the issues, as well as practical experiential learning. Various education methods are employed including case studies, lectures, outside speakers, field trips, role-playing exercises, group projects and hands-on learning activities. (Weinberg)

Description for the 2011 Children's Summer Institute Program: This year's Children's Summer Institute will focus on permanency considerations concerning children in the child welfare system, with an emphasis on disparities in decision making in the child welfare system and the resulting disproportional representation of minorities in child welfare systems across the country.

For more information about the class, or permission to register, contact Professor Weinberg at aweinbe@luc.edu or 312-915-6482.

Experiential Learning

Skills

The Civitas ChildLaw Clinic represents children primarily in child protection (abuse and neglect), child custody and visitation, delinquency cases. Students typically work on at least two cases during the course of a semester, under the supervision of at least one member of the clinic faculty. The Clinic also includes a weekly seminar (Tuesdays from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.), which addresses relevant substantive law, advocacy skills, and ethical issues in the representation of children. Students will be expected to master the law governing their areas of practice, as well as applicable rules of professional conduct. Students will gain experience with a range of lawyering skills, including client counseling, case planning, and written and oral advocacy. While the subject matter of the Clinic's cases focuses on children's issues, students should expect to develop skills transferrable to any practice setting. Enrollment in the clinic is limited to 16 students. Priority is given to students eligible for a student practice license under Illinois Supreme Court Rule 7-11, and permission of the Clinic instructors is required for enrollment. Civitas ChildLaw Clinic Application.

Participation in the Clinic requires both a significant time commitment and flexibility in the student's schedule. All students will be expected to attend and conduct court appearances throughout the semester, and to be available to attend to other client business during regular working hours. Students working full or nearly full time, or students who have concerns about their ability to maintain a flexible schedule, should speak with one of the members of the Clinic faculty before enrolling in the class. In addition, to avoid conflicts of interest, students may not participate in the Clinic while working for the criminal or juvenile divisions of the State's Attorney's Office, or the juvenile division of the Public Defender's Office.

Professor Bruce Boyer serves as the Clinic Director, and Professor Stacey Platt serves as Associate Director.

* Students in the Clinic for the first time must enroll for four credits and will be expected to participate fully in the classroom component. Students enrolling for a second semester will be expected to participate bi-weekly in the seminar; normally, students repeating the Clinic for a second semester take the course for three credits, but other options are available with permission of the instructor.

Experiential Learning

Skills

The Community Law Center Clinic (LUCLC) course is designed to teach students the essential skills involved in the practice of law, including client interviewing and counseling, hearing advocacy, negotiation and practice management. These skills are taught in conjunction with the representation by students of clients in civil cases under the supervision of Professor Theresa Ceko and the law school's clinical faculty. The Law Center is located in Room 1005 of the law school.

Students who enroll in the clinic course must be available to be in the clinic either one morning or one afternoon each week (Monday-Friday). The course also has a classroom component that meets each Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. The purpose of the classroom component is to provide students with a theoretical overview of the lawyering skills that they perform at the clinic. In addition to regular clinic hours and classroom work, clinic students work on their cases during an additional 6 hours a week, most of this work done on the student's own time. Any student who has completed the first year of law school can enroll in the clinic course.

Students in the LUCLC represent children in contested guardianship cases and clients in civil cases involving landlord/tenant, family and elder law problems. Many of LUCLC's clients are low income persons. Serving persons who cannot afford legal services sensitizes students to the special ways that the law affects the lives of the indigent.

Another important aspect of the LUCLC course is the opportunity for students to develop their own sense of the lawyer's professional role. Students experience the complexity of the attorney-client relationship and the myriad ethical dimensions of lawyering. Students are exposed for the first time to the conflicts, frustrations and rewards inherent in legal practice.

Enrollment in the Community Law Center Clinic course also helps students prepare for the performance tests that have been added to many state bar examinations, including Illinois. The skills that these performance tests measure are the same skills that students learn through their client representation.

The Community Law Center Clinic course is an excellent bridge from the law school classroom to the law office. It allows students to begin to learn how to practice law in a reflective environment. (Ceko)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Students in the LUCLC represent children in contested guardianship cases and clients in civil cases involving landlord/tenant, family and elder law problems. Many of LUCLC's clients are low income persons. Serving persons who cannot afford legal services sensitizes students to the special ways that the law affects the lives of the indigent.

Another important aspect of the LUCLC course is the opportunity for students to develop their own sense of the lawyer's professional role. Students experience the complexity of the attorney-client relationship and the myriad ethical dimensions of lawyering. Students are exposed for the first time to the conflicts, frustrations and rewards inherent in legal practice.

Enrollment in the Community Law Center Clinic course also helps students prepare for the performance tests that have been added to many state bar examinations, including Illinois. The skills that these performance tests measure are the same skills that students learn through their client representation.

The Community Law Center Clinic course is an excellent bridge from the law school classroom to the law office. It allows students to begin to learn how to practice law in a reflective environment. (Ceko)

Experiential Learning

Skills

This course focuses on how lawyers work with communities and organizations to bring about change and takes a practical approach to understanding different forms of community-based lawyering. Students will work (for an approximate total of 50 hours in the semester) on projects with community organizations. Their work may entail doing research, creating fact sheets and manuals, conducting "know your rights" presentations in the community, helping to craft the message of a campaign, writing press releases, and strategizing with community members on how to identify and resolve particular issues. In addition to their fieldwork, every week, students will be assigned readings relating to course topics, such as organizing and different theories of change, the tools and strategies of lawyers, the history of lawyers working with different communities, and the role of law and lawyers in different movements. We will have discussions based on the assigned readings, and guest speakers will join us throughout the semester.

Perspective Elective

This course begins with an exploration of the legal and political structure of American education, including issues such as: (1) the role of government in mandating education; (2) the relationship between state and religion in the educational process; (3) the governance of educational institutions and the shaping of curriculum; and (4) the rights and responsibilities of teachers and students. The American legal system's resolution of these difficult issues are then compared to the resolution of these same issues by legal systems in other countries. Finally, students are asked to question the fundamental assumptions underlying the American educational system based on their understanding of different assumptions underlying the educational systems in other nations. Students are required to help to facilitate class discussions and to prepare a paper that analyzes critically an issue raised in the class. (Kaufman)

This course covers the procedural and substantive components of the due process and equal protection clauses. Other topics include the contracts clause and the takings clause. Civil rights legislation may be covered at the discretion of the instructor. (Shoenberger, Tsesis)

The course surveys consumer law from a transactional perspective, beginning with issues of deception, including false advertising, related to consumer purchases. There is coverage of the law of consumer credit, including issues of discrimination, overpriced credit and deceptive credit practices, and standard form contracts of adhesion and recent Supreme Court rulings covering binding arbitration and class actions. Consumer remedies and special issues of consumer fraud on the Internet complete course coverage. The course is especially recommended for students interested in public interest law. (Amato)

Bar

This course is designed to provide a detailed examination of the criminal judicial process, pre-trial to post-trial, and includes an examination of: prosecutorial discretion, right to bail, pre-trial motions, double jeopardy, plea bargaining, discovery, jury selection, various trial issues, appeals, and post-trial remedies. (Norton, Raphael)

Bar

This course provides a general overview of the criminal justice process, and focuses on the constitutional and other legal requirements that affect law enforcement practices and procedures. Specific topics may include confessions and interrogations, identification procedures, arrest, search and seizure, surveillance, police entrapment, and the right to counsel. (Norton, Raphael)

Using a variety of interdisciplinary materials, this seminar will explore significant examples from history and law that illustrate and raise questions about the construction of historical meaning. We will study the legal history of race relations, including the histories of African Americans, American Indians, Latinos/as, Asian Americans and Whites. We will explore the significance of omissions from the usual understanding of what our racial history includes. We may also discuss original intention and other related topics.
The construction of historical knowledge is a fascinating and contested subject. The production of a historical narrative requires the interpretation and selection of historical evidence, necessitating significant choices about which evidence to include and which evidence to exclude. Such decisions about the meaning and content of history reveal much about a historian's, and ultimately society's, values. (Perea)

This seminar will review the use of the death penalty in our country's history and then take an in-depth look at the issues relating to whether there should be a death penalty.

We will examine national developments on the issue and discuss the recent history of the death penalty in Illinois, including the removal of all prisoners from Death Row by former Governor George Ryan, the report of the commission appointed by the Governor to examine capital punishment issues, the basis for the moratorium on the death penalty and the factors affecting Governor Quinn's decision on the 2011 bill to ban the death penalty.

Assigned readings will include Debating the Death Penalty, edited by Hugo Bedau and Paul Cassell (Oxford, 2004), Ultimate Punishment by Scott Turow, portions of the Report of the Governor's Commission on the Death Penalty, and various articles and court decisions.

There will be guest speakers who have participated in aspects of the death penalty process and the debate on its use.

Each participant will be assigned a paper on a topic covered in these materials. (Devine)

More than 50 million Americans have disabilities, even as the population just begins to age significantly. The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990 as a key civil rights law to help persons with disabilities obtain access to employment, government functions at all levels, and most public Accommodations. This seminar will explore how our disability laws have succeeded, and failed, to fulfill their promise. We will also examine closely the significant recent activity by the Supreme Court in this evolving, dynamic area of the law. Each student is expected to select a topic of particular interest to him or her, perform an in-depth review of the law related to that topic, and write a paper on the subject. Student's progress will be tracked through class discussion, informed reaction papers and the final research paper. (Coustan)

Perspective Elective
Skills

This seminar will explore the difficult legal, political and practical issues currently confronting American education. The course will begin with an analysis of the fundamental political and philosophical principles underlying the American educational system. Students will then be challenged to apply these principles to difficult areas of education law, such as: (1) the limits of compulsory education; (2) the relationship between public education and religious institutions and practices; (3) the nature of a constitutional right to education; (4) the adequacy and equity of school funding; (5) the balance between federal control through statutes, like the No Child Left Behind Act, and state control over curriculum; (6) school governance; (7) the rights and responsibilities of students; (8) traditional and novel torts in the educational environment; and (9) the rights and responsibilities of educators. Students will be required to participate actively in class, to facilitate class discussion of a selected topic, and to submit a paper which analyzes critically an important issue raised in the class. There will be no final examination. (Kaufman)

Experiential Learning 

Skills

This unique course has a classroom component and a field work component.  The class meets formally one hour per week to cover substantive education law issues and to develop skills tailored to the practice of education law.  For the field work component of the class, students have the option to work in one of a variety of local placements where they will work under the supervision of practicing attorneys.  Students may choose to provide either: (1) direct representation and legal assistance to children and families in need of special education services; or (2) representation of school districts in education law matters.   Students may also work on educational policy matters.  Placement options include local organizations, school districts, law firms and government agencies.  In the Spring semester, students may participate in Loyola’s Educational Advocacy Project as an alternative to an external field placement.  (Kaufman, Coustan).  More information on the different placement options is available here.

An in-depth study of the national policy opposing discrimination in employment and the ways in which this policy is addressed by federal and state law. While the focus is Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, numerous other sources of worker protection are examined, both substantively and procedurally.

The law governing the employment relationship is not limited to the union management confrontation of traditional labor law and the proscriptions of employment discrimination statutes. Both common law claims and other statutes have become major sources in challenging, e.g., drug testing, plant closings, lie detectors, whistleblowers, wrongful discharge. This course explores those legal problems. This is not a duplication of either Labor Law or Employment Discrimination; neither is a pre-requisite. The course focuses on the total configuration of statutes regulating employment as well as the emerging common law principles affecting employment relationships. (Connelly, Cooper, Luetkemeyer)

Skills

This will be a practical class designed to develop counseling skills in the representation of employees and employers, with an emphasis on assisting employers in complying with the major state and federal laws governing the workplace.  The goal is to prepare you to provide clear and considered advice to clients in an effort to minimize the personal and business risks and costs associated with employment litigation.  Topics covered include: (1) interviewing and counseling employment law clients; (2) recognizing the legal and practical aspects of employment issues to help clients make appropriate decisions; (3) identifying alternative solutions to workplace problems; (4) reviewing and drafting key employment documents, including handbooks, contracts, and personnel records; (5) handling discipline and termination cases; (6) managing the workplace crisis, including counseling employers on how to investigate and respond to whistle-blower complaints or complaints of harassment and discrimination; (7) training employees and managers on employment law compliance issues; and (8) strategies for dealing with common issues under state and federal worker protection laws such as the ADA, FMLA and FLSA. (Cripe)

An introductory course aimed at introducing the major federal environmental statutes and the types of analytical and practical problems encountered in the practice of environmental law and in environmental litigation. The course is devoted to reading and discussion of statutes, cases, articles, and problems in the various environmental media: air, water, and land disposal. Some technical science and engineering concepts are included. (Rieser, Shoenberger)

Experiential Learning
Skills

Students who have completed all first year courses (Civil Procedure, Contracts, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Property, Torts, and Legal Writing) and who wish to receive graded credit for work performed in an approved field placement may apply for this externship. Certain field placements may limit eligibility to students who have completed certain course work or who have obtained their Rule 711 license. Students enrolled in this course may receive two or three hours of graded credit for supervised work performed in an approved field placement. This externship includes a classroom component that focuses on the performance of discrete legal tasks. It has been designed to allow students an opportunity to further develop practical lawyering skills. Students will be graded on classroom participation, simulations, practice area based drafting and research assignments, and field placement evaluations. There will be no final examination. (Gough)

Bar

This course is a study of cases, statutes, and legal principles relevant to the formation, regulation and dissolution of the family unit, and to legal obligations which arise incident to the family relationship. The course considers: antenuptial agreements, marriage, annulment, divorce, division of property incident to divorce, maintenance, custody, visitation, child support, tax law, and ethical issues. (Anderson, Coupet)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Students in this practicum will administer a skills component of the traditional Family Law foundational course, focusing specifically on the drafting of an antenuptial agreement in a complex case hypothetical. Practicum students will serve as clients in the drafting exercise. In this capacity, students will meet face-to-face with the collective group of student attorneys representing each client and engage in ongoing, timely and detailed electronic communication with student attorney teams throughout the course of the skills exercise. Practicum students will also assist in evaluating the client counseling facet of the exercise, and in reviewing each prenup for its substantive terms. Each practicum student will spend approximately 40 hours engaged in work related to the exercise. Students may enroll in this practicum only with permission from the instructor. (Coupet)

Experiential Learning

Skills

The purpose of the Federal Tax Clinic is to educate the student in the practice and procedures of federal tax law and dispute resolution before the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the United States Tax Court. The tax clinic is neither exclusively a "skills center" nor a "theory center." Instead, all the numerous components of tax law practice are integrated in the curriculum of both classroom study and legal practice with actual clients. Some of the subjects include client interviewing and counseling, negotiations, and tax litigation. Students handle cases at the IRS and Tax Court level on a clinical basis and, with the clinic attorneys, prepare all appropriate written responses to the IRS, prepare Tax Court petitions, and litigate tax cases. Federal Income Tax is a prerequisite, and Tax Audits, Procedure and Ethics is recommended.  (Novy)

Experiential

Skills

The purpose of the Federal Tax Clinic is to educate the student in the practice and procedures of federal tax law and dispute resolution before the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the United States Tax Court. Federal Tax Clinic II affords students from the tax clinic the opportunity to carry their cases through to completion. It is more independent and sophisticated than tax clinic I. Students continue to develop the skills that they learned in tax clinic I, including client interviewing, negotiations, tax litigation, correspondence with the IRS, and preparation of petitions to Tax Court. Federal Income Tax and Tax Clinic I are prerequisites.

The purpose of the course is to explore, in ways that are personally meaningful and professionally useful, the role of law in regulating the lives of women. We will cover the historical background of feminist legal theory, the standards of constitutional equality, the various feminist theories, and the construction of female sexuality. We will turn to Nussbaum's work on sex and social justice in order to pursue a philosophical grounding in the anti-subordination principle on a global basis. The remainder of the course will study one or more of the following, to be determined by the class: violence against women, reproduction, marriage, mothering, education, wage labor, and the legal profession.

This course examines the history, theory, and jurisprudence of the First Amendment, with particular emphasis on the speech, press and religion clauses.

This course provides an overview of statutory, administrative and case law affecting Illinois school districts.  Legal issues addressed include: powers and duties of the school board; compliance with open records and open meetings laws; teacher tenure, evaluation, reduction-in-force, and for cause dismissal; collective bargaining and labor dispute resolution; legal aspects of supervision, teacher/school liability, common law and statutory immunities; mandated child abuse reporting. Student issues include state law requirements pertinent to residency; discipline, drugs/weapons offenses, suspension and expulsion; federal and state student confidentiality laws. (Hirsman)

This course will introduce students into the roles of government, charitable, and private institutions in identifying, preventing, and addressing public health issues.  Students explore the role of state government, federal government, and the private sector in addressing issues surrounding healthcare delivery, access, financing, quality, cost control, the uninsured, transparency, and public health.  Students will have the opportunity to draft analysis of government policies and work in teams to present on a public health issue. (Carvalho, Deaton)

Experiential Learning

Skills

The Health Justice Project is a live-client law school clinic that provides law students with an intensive, challenging education in the fundamentals of legal practice, systemic advocacy, interdisciplinary collaboration, creative problem solving and professional values.  Through direct representation of clients and participation in an interdisciplinary medical-legal partnership, students address the social, legal and systemic barriers that prevent long-term health and stability for low-income individuals and families in Chicago. Case subject matter may include housing, public benefits, disability and other areas of law. Enrollment in the Clinic requires a significant time commitment and flexibility in the student’s schedule.  Students are required to attend hearings and court appearances, participate in an interdisciplinary partnership and tend to other client matters throughout the semester.  Students must be available to participate in a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester. Faculty permission required.

Skills

The course includes the study of public and private housing, with reference to federal and state constitutional and statutory law. In 1949, Congress declared the goal of “a decent home in a suitable living environment for every American family.” However, more than 60 years later, over 95 million Americans confront serious housing problems or have no housing at all. Students will gain an understanding of the history of housing law, the lack of adequate housing in the United States, the consequences of inadequate housing, as well as the programs and legal tools designed to meet housing needs. Students will examine various programs designed to facilitate access to decent and affordable housing and develop strategies for addressing the housing crisis. Each student will prepare a seminar paper (or series of papers) on an aspect of housing as well as present in class on that topic.

This interdisciplinary seminar will explore issues confronting children who are survivors of human trafficking within the United States, as well as an examination of efforts to prevent and intervene in this social problem. The seminar will begin with an overview of contemporary laws and policies addressing human trafficking, explore various frameworks (gender, criminal justice, public health) around movements to combat child trafficking, analyze current research in the field, and explore case management, services, and techniques utilized by service providers. Assignments will include in-class exercises and a final project addressing ways to advance the movement to combat child in the United States.

This course includes an examination of the following: historical perspective; execution of the laws; the 1952 Act and its amendments, including the 1986 amendments; a review of the immigration system including judicial review and the naturalization and citizenship process; rights, privileges and obligations of aliens in the U.S.; ethics of legal practice in this area; the future of immigration law and policy. (McCormick, Vinikoor)

Experiential Learning

Skills

This course is taken in conjunction with the Health Justice Project course and provides students with an opportunity to participate in an interdisciplinary team to address health problems of low-income patients. Students partner with medical residents and doctors to explore communication and ethical issues among disciplines and actively participate in precepting and grand rounds with medical and social work partners. Faculty permission required.

Perspective Elective
Skills

This seminar explores issues of family violence, with an emphasis on domestic violence, through an interdisciplinary lens. An overview of the laws, public policy, and psychosocial approaches and trends addressing family violence issues. The course seeks to provide an opportunity for students in different disciplines to learn about the theories, philosophies, ethics, and practices of the range of professions that must confront family violence issues, and the impact of decision making in one forum on the practices and decisions made in another forum. Student are challenged to consider the strengths and weakness of the responses of various disciplines, and their interaction.

Experiential Learning

Skills

Students enrolled in Introduction to Health Justice serve as client advocates. Students conduct intake and, through direct interaction with clients, practice issue spotting, interview skills and creative problem-solving.  Clients may present with variety of matters related to health, such as housing code violations, medical debt, disability, special education, public benefits denials and other critical needs. Students also gain an understanding of interdisciplinary collaboration in the practice of law and an overview of legal systems that respond to poverty and health disparities. Students must be available to participate in a mandatory orientation prior to the start of the semester and are expected to maintain a minimum of six office hours per week. Faculty permission required.

Perspective Elective
Skills


This course will attempt to answer the following questions: How should society handle allegations of criminal behavior by children? In what way should the proceedings be designed to address the differences between children and adults? Who should decide whether a child should benefit from special treatment, judges or legislators? What responsibility do parents and communities bear in providing children an opportunity to change their behavior? How should the justice system and the school system interact? While the intersection between the child welfare and juvenile justice systems will be discussed, this course will not address child welfare practice generally or in much detail. Students will be required to prepare brief position papers during the term. The remainder of the grade will be based on performance in class and on a final examination or a major research paper written in lieu of the final exam. (Geraghty)

This course examines the development of the law under the National Labor Relations Act. This statute and its decisional law are the primary means of governmental regulation of the union management relationship in the private sector. The organizational process and the collective bargaining process are the fundamental arenas in which to study the rights and duties of three separate entities: the individual, the union, and the employer.

Topics that may be covered include: (1) procedures and principles governing both the selection and decertification of unions; (2) the free speech, access and other rights of management and unions during an organizational campaign; (3) the duty to bargain in good faith; (4) the laws respecting strikes, lockouts, boycotts, and other concerted action by employees; (5) the duty of fair representation; (6) compulsory dues and other payment to unions; (7) the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements in grievance-arbitration and/or court action; and (8) the procedural and substantive law governing "unfair labor practices," by both employers and unions. (Cooper, Luetkemeyer)

This course focuses on the application of economic principles to legal analysis. The course provides an introduction to basic economic principles and math concepts. (Langenfeld, Ramirez)

Perspective Elective

This course concerns those areas of civil law which most affect low income persons: landlord/tenant, federal housing, welfare, social security, Medicaid, Medicare, unemployment compensation, and civil rights. Other systemic issues will be explored, such as wealth discrimination, use of legal remedies to promote social change, and the delivery of legal services to low income persons. (Ramirez, Rose)

This course explores the role of law and government regulation in the area of public health. The public health process (measurement, problem definition, strategy, design, implementation and evaluation) is explored in reference to current issues that are both timely and expositive of the ways in which law and regulation shape public health practice at the local, state, federal and international levels. Topical areas for analysis and discussion are drawn from the primary environments of public health; biological, physical, social, individual behavior, and national/international health systems. Students are required to work on group projects, and write a research paper. (Blum)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Few resources exist to assist individuals who have been exonerated after serving time in prison for crimes they did not commit.  Life After Innocence (“LAI”) – the first and still one of the only projects solely devoted to post-exoneration services – provides its student members with unique practical and educational experiences in a clinical classroom setting.

LAI provides a variety of legal and social services to its clients through direct interaction between students and exonerates. Students work together in practice groups to develop practical lawyering skills, acquire a deeper understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, and cultivate an attorney-client relationship in a unique and still emerging area of law. Projects may include obtaining expungement of criminal records, litigating petitions for certificates of innocence, drafting amicus briefs, and engaging with areas of law ranging from family law to criminal procedure. Students also work with exonerees as they procure identification, find housing, search for employment, obtain health services, and learn technological skills. Senior law students eligible for a 711 license may actively participate in court proceedings and draft legal documents under the supervision of LAI faculty members.

A weekly two and a half hour class meeting simulates the environment of a staff meeting in a small law firm. In addition to attending class, students will commit to performing 4-6 hours of course related work each week. Students will provide a weekly summary of time billed and agree to complete any projects not completed during the semester.

Experiential Learning
Skills

406 - Mediation Advocacy (3)

Experiential Learning
Skills


Mediation is an alternative to litigation which enables disputing parties to negotiate their own agreed settlement. It involves an impartial third party neutral, the mediator, who assists disputing parties in this alternative dispute resolution (ADR) process. This course will offer an overview of mediation techniques, applications, and history. Through simulations and other in-class exercises, students will consider how mediation differs from other types of ADR processes, how mediation styles and models differ from one another, and how the role of the attorney-advocate changes during mediation. This course will be conducted in an intensive workshop format over the course of one weekend where students will role play as client and attorney.  No textbook is required, nor is there a first assignment. (Green

This course introduces students to the cases, statutes, and legal doctrines relating to the rights, treatment, and commitment of persons with mental illness, developmental disabilities, or intellectual disabilities. Topics covered include:  confidentiality of mental health records, forms of surrogate decision-makers (i.e. guardianship, powers of attorney), mental health treatment for minors, right to refuse treatment, special education, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Students will discuss real-life cases and examples to compare and contract application of the law and policies. (Monahan, McCarty)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the role of natural law in the development of the law, with an emphasis on the position of natural rights in American Law and International Law. The specific context of our examination will be the natural rights of the human person. Three interrelated objectives of this course are: (1) to develop an understanding of what the natural law is and what it is not; (2) to dispel the skepticism (myths) about the role of natural law; and (3) to demonstrate the critical role in the evolution of natural human rights in American Law and International Law. Several particular rights will be examined to sharpen the focus of our investigation and discussion. Our readings will consist of primary and secondary sources compiled into a reader that will be made available in electronic form. There is one required book that will have to be purchased, viz. Heinrich Rommen's "The Natural Law."(Araujo)

Skills

Loyola is offering a full-day Boot Camp for students who are or will be working at public interest organizations. The one-credit Boot Camp will focus on a wide range of issues intended to make your public interest work experience more productive and successful. Discussions will focus on topics such as what organizations expect from law students, how to more effectively handle assignments, what resources are available to help with research and drafting, and how to better deal with, and possibly avoid, some of the pitfalls associated with public interest practice. Emphasis will be placed on professionalism, identifying certain basic institutional do’s and don’ts.

Law student attendees will receive instruction in how to navigate and use Illinois Legal Aid Online, an extraordinary research tool for the legal aid community. They will also have the opportunity to participate in interactive exercises and review form documents, which will better equip them to take on assignments such as interviewing clients, drafting complaints or answers, and preparing discovery documents. The Boot Camp will also feature a panel discussion, with participants from various public interest organizations, who will address such topics as training, supervision, types of assignments, feedback, and handling those situations in which law students seem to run into trouble. There will be ample opportunity during the Boot Camp to ask questions.

The Boot Camp will be led by Jack Block. Professor Block, currently an Adjunct Professor at Loyola, has extensive public interest experience which includes serving as Deputy Director of the Legal Assistance Foundation, heading the Pro Bono Committee at the law firm of Sachnoff & Weaver (now Reed Smith), and chairing the Legal Aid Committee of the Chicago Bar Association. He has received a number of awards, including Loyola’s Public Interest Convocation Award.

Students enrolled in the extern course/intensive field placement during the spring semester or summer semester may count their attendance at this important event against the number of hours required for course credit OR they may earn one hour of course credit. 

Students who want one hour of credit must register for the course.  Students who want hours credited toward their externship hourly requirement must confirm their attendance with Professor Jack Block. 

Questions about the program should be emailed to jacklblock@gmail.com

The seminar will focus on recent Illinois zoning and other land use cases. Land use and zoning is the most important substantive law area applicable to real estate development. Each student will select a reported case concerning subject property in the Chicago area. The student will visit the site, perhaps taking photographs or videos. To the extent possible, the parties and their counsel will be interviewed. No library research should be necessary. However, all students will read the court's opinion, and the student reporting on the case will also read the briefs of the parties. Each student will be given one full class period to make an oral report to the seminar, beginning at the sixth week of classes. All members of the seminar will be required to attend these reports. After reporting and discussing the case with the seminar, each student will write a paper about the case not to exceed 15 double spaced pages (12 point type). After the case assignments have been finalized, I will give a number of lectures about basic land use and zoning. Students who have completed or who are concurrently enrolled in Land Use will not be required to attend these lectures. The students not thereby excused from attendance will also be required to read assignments in Wright, Land Use in a Nutshell (West, 4th ed., 2000). Enrollment is limited to 14, and the consent of the instructor to enroll is required. (McCormack)

This course primarily covers the law of special education provided in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (“IDEA”).  Additionally, the course will also cover specific laws that are relevant to special education such as the Americans with Disability Act, Federal and State educational records statues and mental health and privacy laws.

A primary emphasis of the class will be to teach students about the process under which students are identified as eligible for special education services and provided with educational services under Individualized Education Plans. (“IEPs”). The class will focus on the following topics: special education case law, legislation, and regulations; utilizing evaluations, tests and measurements in determining eligibility in special education, and in the preparation of Individualized Educational Programs and Section 504 Plans; issues of juvenile justice; behavior and discipline for students with disabilities; negation and dispute resolution strategies and options; due process hearings; and current challenges in this evolving area of law. 

Students are required to attend class. Participation is a critical element of the class experience and will be a portion of the student’s grade.

Additionally students will be required to write one ten page paper on a topic approved by the instructor and participate in teams to develop IEP’s.

Skills

Experiential Learning


Second- and third-year students teach about law and the legal system in Chicago area elementary and high schools. Students attend a weekly seminar and teach two classes per week in their assigned school. In the spring semester students typically have the option of preparing high school students for the city mock trial competition. For that experience, prior or current enrollment in Trial Practice is advisable, but not required. (Bird)

This course will introduce the therapeutic jurisprudence perspective on practicing law in various settings: criminal, civil, family, juvenile, special education and in office practice as well as in litigation. The assigned course book will be Judging in a Therapeutic KeyTherapeutic Jurisprudence and the Courts ( Winkler and Wexler, eds 2003). Various articles including law review articles will be assigned to explore the role of problem solving courts and how that translates into practice for lawyers. Chapters from Practicing Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Law as a Helping Profession ( Stolle, Wexler, Winnick eds.2000) and Symposium: Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Children:  71 U.Cinn.L. rev. ( 2002);

1. Students will be assigned one 15 page paper dealing with a topic of their choice regarding therapeutic jurisprudence. Students will be expected to present this paper for class discussion.

2. Students will also be expected to observe in one of several court settings including Cook County Mental Health Court and Drug Court, Juvenile Court or Family Court. Arrangements for those visits will be facilitated by Professor Moran. Students will be expected to write a 5 page summary of their observation and relate this to the topic of therapeutic jurisprudence. (Moran)

Loyola

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