Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Dan K. Webb Center for Advocacy

School of Law

Course Offerings

This course counts as an Experiential Learning and Skills Course

Students will represent pro se clients pursuing employment discrimination claims at mediations taking place at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or mediations held by federal magistrates in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Under the supervision of an experienced attorney, students will work in pairs and interview and counsel a pro se client, prepare the case for mediation, and represent the client at the mediation conference. Representation is limited to the mediation. Class time will be devoted to discussion of assigned readings in employment law and mediation advocacy, pending cases, written mediation memoranda and skills development through simulations.

This course, which has won high praise from both students and clients, is open to students who have some prior experience with interest - based, problem solving skills, either through taking a mediation advocacy, mediation, client counseling or negotiation class, including the ADR class, or through participating on the client counseling, mediation or negotiation teams. Other similar experience will also be considered. LLM students are also eligible for this class. Eligibility for a Supreme Court Rule 711 student license (43 credit hours completed) is preferred but not required.

(Simon)

Experiential

Skills

This course is for students who have already taken and passed the Mediation Certification & Courthouse Practicum. Students in this course will further develop and build upon their mediation skills by mediating actual long model cases at the Center for Conflict Resolution, as well as short model cases at the Cook County courts. Students will turn in written case summaries and assessments after the mediations and use the classroom time to discuss and learn from each other’s mediation experiences. This is a 3-credit course. Grading is based on participation in mediations, class discussions and written work. Professor permission is required.  

Skills

Class focus will be on mediation, arbitration and other forms of Alternative Dispute Resolution, with an emphasis on learning procedural aspects of mediation and arbitration, as well as negotiation skills. This course will provide students with the opportunity to gain practical knowledge and familiarity with the different methods of alternatives to litigation. Classes will include lectures, simulations, role-playing, and outcome-based actual case studies. (Moritz)(Roethke)

Experiential Learning

Skills

This class is taught by Professor Terry Moritz and meets on four Friday and Saturday afternoons.  The 2014 class will be held Oct. 31-Nov. 1 and Nov. 7-8.

The workshop will focus on the substantive and procedural components of commercial arbitration in the United States.  The class will address established principles of arbitration law, the various types of arbitrations, the rules governing arbitration, the role of counsel in the arbitration process, as well as the power, responsibilities and ethical requirements of an arbitrator.  The course will combine a traditional lecture format with practical arbitration experience  and video presentations designed to provide the student with both a firm substantive basis in arbitration, as well as clinical experience workshop problem solving. The course includes participation in a mock arbitration.

 

Skills

Experiential Learning  

This course will explore the use of mediation in disputes involving children and families. Students will survey various models and uses of mediation and related dispute resolution processes in the following contexts: divorce, custody and visitation issues; child protection; juvenile delinquency; balanced and restorative justice; adult guardianships; youth violence prevention and peer mediation; and special education. Further, students will consider the impact of domestic violence and other impairments on the child and family mediation process. In addition to reviewing basic mediation skills, students will participate in classroom exercises designed to develop their ability to think critically about issues, as well as apply mediation strategies to dispute resolution scenarios. (Levitz, Nathanson)

Skills

This course is designed to develop skills used by lawyers in their roles as client interviewer, counselor and negotiator. Emphasis is on class participation. The first hour of each class is devoted to lecture/discussion of the covered topics. During the second hour students participate in practice problems which emphasize the skills taught in the first hour. Students are graded on the following: written paper, one videotaped out of class problem, and class participation. Because of the heavy emphasis on class participation, the class is limited to 18 students. (Suder)

Experiential Learning

Skills

“This skills training course will be conducted in an intensive workshop format over the course of two successive weekends.  Students will learn the basic elements of client counseling and negotiation techniques and put them into practice. We will cover the process of interviewing and counseling clients and the negotiation process from the initial establishment of rapport, to the resolution of the conflict and compromise, to reach final agreement. The skills will be taught through role playing as client and attorney and as attorney vs opposing counsel.  The course is ungraded, however, students will be evaluated by in class performance, by written exam and by a final performance in counseling a client and/or an assimilated negotiation to determine a grade of pass or failure.

Students may elect [in advance] to receive one or two credits for the course based on participation in one or two weekends.  The first weekend will focus on Client Counseling and the second weekend will focus on Negotiations.”

Skills

Experiential Learning  

This course will provide students insight and practical knowledge of alternative dispute resolutions. This course focuses on the attorney's ability to understand the differences in the practice of mediation and the more recent development of the Collaborative law process and understand the application of each. Students will learn through didactic as well as skill-centered methods, giving each the opportunity to practice skills through role play and “fishbowl” exercises. We will cover the basics of mediation and Collaborative practice while emphasizing useful derivative skills that will serve students well in their future law careers. A client-centered approach, the primary goal of this class is to expose students to effective communication methods and skills that lead to settlement without litigation. Guest lecturers will bring their specific areas of expertise to the class so that students will be able to see first-hand the application of the processes we will be studying and be able better to emulate them. The final grade will awarded based partly on a 10 page critical paper and more significantly from class participation. (Rosenbloom and occasional guest lecturers)

599 – Externship – Intensive Field Placement Chicago (2-3)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Full-time students who have completed all required first year courses and part-time students who have completed a minimum of 28 credit hours may apply for an externship at an approved field placement. Certain field placements may limit eligibility to students who have completed certain course work or who have obtained their Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 license. Students enrolled in an externship may receive 2 or 3 hours of non-graded credit for supervised work performed at an approved field placement coupled with their attendance and participation in the classroom component of the course. The classroom component has been designed to complement the externship experience with a focus on professionalism, ethics, and practice based skill building.  There is no final examination in this course. This course is offered each semester. (Gough, Kieffer)

 

599 – Externship – Intensive Field Placement Washington, DC (2-3)

Experiential Learning

Skills

Full-time students who have completed all required first year courses and part-time students who have completed a minimum of 28 credit hours may apply for an externship at an approved field placement. Certain field placements may limit eligibility to students who have completed certain course work or who have obtained their Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 license. Students enrolled in an externship may receive 2 or 3 hours of non-graded credit for supervised work performed at an approved field placement coupled with their attendance and participation in the classroom component of the course. The classroom component has been designed to complement the externship experience with a focus on professionalism, ethics, and practice based skill building.  There is no final examination in this course. This course is offered only during the summer semester. (Gough, Poll-Klaessy)

Arbitration is increasingly the dispute mechanism of choice, particularly in international disputes. In private international commercial arbitration, neither party wants to be required to resolve a dispute in the foreign court system of the opposing party. In state to state arbitrations, and in state to private company arbitrations, no sovereign state is willing to be subject to the jurisdiction of another sovereign state. Thus, as international business and investment has grown, so has the prevalence of arbitration to resolve international disputes. This course will focus on various forms of international arbitration, whether between two private companies from different countries trying to resolve a contract dispute, two sovereign nations involved in a border dispute, or an investor and a host country dealing with an investment dispute. No prerequisite is required.

Experiential Learning
Skills


(This class is limited to 16 students)

The course uses as a focus the Willem C. Vis International Moot Arbitration Competition. Sponsored by Pace Law School, the Vis Moot is based on a problem governed by the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). In the spring, an oral competition is held in two different venues, Vienna and Hong Kong. Recently, Loyola has been able to send a different team of students to each of the venues. The course includes about three weeks of study of the CISG, as well as approximately three weeks of study of international commercial arbitration, including basic laws and rules, how to draft an arbitration clause, how to choose an arbitrator, and how to participate in an arbitration as an advocate and as an arbitrator.

While the first half of the semester is spent learning about the CISG and arbitration, the second half is spent putting that knowledge into practice. When the problem on which the Moot Competition is based comes on line in October, students work collaboratively to draft Claimants' and Respondents' memoranda. The Claimant's memorandum is due in early December, and the Respondent's memorandum is due in late January. Students also present an oral argument before arbitrators from Chicago law firms, at the offices of the respective law firms. At the end of the semester, a second oral argument is held at the law school, after which students are chosen who will have the opportunity to compete in Vienna and Hong Kong during the spring semester, for an additional two hours of credit.

Through the emphasis on both brief writing and oral arguments, students make significant progress in their skills as advocates, as well as their understanding of dispute resolution in an international context. Their accomplishments have been well recognized in both competitions. More information about the Vis Moot is on the Pace Law School Website: www.cisg.law.pace.edu/vis.html.

Eligibility: If a student is part of a moot court team that will be arguing in the fall semester, he or she is not eligible to take this course, since this is a skills-based course requiring substantial out of class effort in both brief writing and oral argument. If a student is part of a moot court team that will be arguing in the spring semester, he or she is eligible to take the course in the fall, but will not be eligible to compete to be an oralist in the Vienna or Hong Kong competition. Corboy Fellows are not permitted to take this course. The course is not open to LLM students, unless they wish to audit.

Important: Permission of the professor is required. In order to apply, please submit a resume and a statement of interest to Professor Moses, mmoses1@luc.edu explaining a little about your background, and why you are interested in taking this course. (Davis, Moses)

Experiential

Skills

 

This class will focus on mediation theory and practice from the perspective of both the mediator and the advocate.  The goal is for students to gain an understanding of the mediation process and to develop a working knowledge of negotiation and problem-solving strategies, techniques and skills that can be used to more effectively represent clients in resolving disputes.  The course will also address public policy, legal and ethical issues that arise in the mediation context.  Mediation skills are best learned from hands-on experience.  Therefore, a substantial portion of this class will involve role-playing simulations.  Over the course of this class, you will have the opportunity to serve as mediators, represent clients, be clients, and give feedback as observers. (Block, Eatherton)

Skills 

Experiential Learning

Students in this course will be trained to become certified mediators and then develop their mediation skills through hands-on experience mediating in court. The course starts with a mandatory intensive mediation skills training conducted by the Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR) at the beginning of the semester. The course will thereafter meet once a week in seminar to discuss, practice and improve upon student mediation skills. Students who complete the skills training portion of the course and meet all of CCR’s certification requirements will be certified as CCR volunteer mediators and mediate actual cases in Cook County courts while continuing to meet in class once a week to discuss and build on what they learn in the mediations. Upon completion of this course and the CCR certification process, students will be able to continue volunteering as mediators for CCR, as long as they continue to meet CCR’s volunteer requirements. There is no prerequisite for this class; however, preference will be given to students who have already completed a mediation or negotiation course. (Block, Eatherton)

Experiential Learning
Skills


Mediation is an alternative to litigation which enables disputing parties to negotiate their own agreed settlement. It involves an impartial third party neutral, the mediator, who assists disputing parties in this alternative dispute resolution (ADR) process. This course will offer an overview of mediation techniques, applications, and history. Through simulations and other in-class exercises, students will consider how mediation differs from other types of ADR processes, how mediation styles and models differ from one another, and how the role of the attorney-advocate changes during mediation.(Levitz, Nathanson)

Experiential Learning
Skills


Negotiating effectively is one of the most important qualities of a successful lawyer. This course seeks to help you move from negotiating by instinct, as most people do, to negotiating more thoughtfully, more comfortably and with a clearer sense of purpose.
This course merges theory with practice to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness as a negotiator; (2) give you tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, analysis, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory, you will be introduced to issues of representation, ethics, and the place of negotiation in our legal system.
The Negotiation Workshop is a highly rewarding and interactive course. The course syllabus consists of assigned readings, simulations, and written assignments before almost every class, and attendance at one video debrief where we will analyze your skill set. (Michel, Zelizer)

Skills

Experiential Learning

This one credit hour course will provide students with an intensive simulated experience in the various processes of resolution of special education disputes. Areas addressed will include some or all of the following: contested IEP meetings, manifestation determination reviews, resolution meetings, mediation, and due process hearings. Assuming the roles of parent legal advocate and school district counsel, students will develop a practical working knowledge of federal and Illinois statutes and regulations governing special education dispute resolution; develop a legal understanding of, and working familiarity with, student special education records and documents; and learn how to interview and prepare clients, witnesses, school personnel, experts, and others for their respective roles in the dispute resolution process. (Hirsman/Johnson)

Perspective Elective

An introduction to the legal aspects of international business. The course emphasizes the legal problems associated with international trade in goods and foreign direct investment, and covers regulation at the private, national, and international levels, and also may include an extended treatment of international litigation problems and/or the role of the multinational enterprise in world business. (Heard, Moses, Walker)

For the full list of Advocacy courses, click here.

Loyola

SCHOOL OF LAW
Philip H. Corboy Law Center · 25 E. Pearson Street · Chicago, IL 60611 · 312.915.7120

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