Loyola University Chicago

Ignatian Heritage Month 2016

A celebration of St. Ignatius and his legacy

St. Ignatius of Loyola encouraged his followers to seek God in all things, to serve those in need, and to become people for others. His mission can be seen in everything we do at Loyola—and it’s this living legacy that we celebrate throughout Ignatian Heritage Month. Watch the video at right to learn more about the month and see what Loyolans are doing every day to live out St. Ignatius’s mission to serve others.

2016 Calendar of events

Ignatian Heritage Month features more than a dozen events throughout November. Open the panels below for more information.

Inauguration Food Drive

Lakeside Campuses • Through Nov. 3
Health Sciences Campus • Through Nov. 16

In recognition of the presidential inauguration and the focus of building a more just, humane, and sustainable world, Loyola is sponsoring a University-wide food drive to support local food pantries.

Ignatian Heritage Month Social Media Photo Contest

All month

For this year’s contest, show us how you’re creating a more just, humane, and sustainable world in your everyday life. The top photos will be featured on Loyola’s social media accounts—plus the winner will receive Loyola swag. CONTEST RULES

Java with a Jesuit

Mondays-Wednesdays, and
Fridays throughout November
6:30–8:30 a.m.
Starbucks (State St. and Pearson St.)

Come share a coffee and stimulating conversations with the School of Social Work chaplain, Jerry Overbeck, S.J. LEARN MORE

LUMA Gallery Talk: ‘Power and Piety
Spanish Colonial Art’

November 1 • 6 p.m.
LUMA (820 N. Michigan Avenue)

D. Scott Hendrickson, S.J., assistant professor of Spanish and graduate program director, will discuss how the art on display in the exhibition Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art functioned in the social and historical context in which it was produced. MORE

‘A Luminous Absence: Poetry and the Need for God’s Absence’

November 3 • 3:30–5:30 p.m.
Palm Court • 4th Floor, Mundelein Center

Irish poet and novelist John Deane will give a lecture focusing on the poetry of Irish poet Seamus Heaney and other notable writers, while exploring the poetry of faith.

Mass of Remembrance

November 6 • 5–6 p.m.
Madonna della Strada Chapel

Loyola’s annual Mass of Remembrance falls on the Feast of All Saints. We gather as a community to remember those who have died in our community and in our families. All are welcome to this special Mass. DETAILS

Hunger Week

November 7–12
Various times and locations

Help educate, advocate, and raise money to end hunger. This year’s beneficiaries include the Greater Chicago Food Depository, No Kid Hungry, and The Hunger Project. MORE

Film Screening: ‘Ignacio de Loyola’

November 7 • 6 p.m.
Damen Student Center Cinema

Ignacio de Loyola is a thrilling look at the life of founder of the Society of Jesus.

Film Screening: ‘Ignacio de Loyola’

November 9 • 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Damen Student Center Cinema

Ignacio de Loyola is a thrilling look at the life of founder of the Society of Jesus.

Ignatian Heritage Month Book Club

November 9 • Noon
Corboy Law Center, Room 727

Come discuss “Just Mercy.” To register and receive your book, contact Chris Murphy at cmurph3@luc.edu. And feel free to bring your lunch to the discussion. MORE

‘Astronomy and Faith: From Lemaitre's Big Bang to the Jesuit fathers of the Vatican Observatory’

November 10 • 11:30 a.m.
Ceremonial Courtroom • Corboy Law Center, 10th Floor

November 10 • 4 p.m.
Palm Court • 4th Floor, Mundelein Center

Against the backdrop of the present-day polemics regarding “science vs. faith” is the story of how the Big Bang model came to be—thanks to a Catholic priest. Jonathan Lunine, PhD, director of the Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, will describe his experiences working with Jesuit astronomers.

Ignatian Heritage Month Book Club

November 11 • Noon
Cuneo Center, Room 250

Come discuss “Just Mercy.” To register and receive your book, contact Chris Murphy at cmurph3@luc.edu. And feel free to bring your lunch to the discussion. MORE

Jesuits on Tap

November 13 • 8–9 p.m.
Lu’s Deli • Baumhart Hall

Come share drinks, food, and stimulating conversations with some of Loyola’s finest—the Jesuits. Free with a Loyola ID. MORE

Ignatian Heritage Month Book Club

November 15 • 12 p.m
Cuneo Hall, Room 410

Come discuss “Just Mercy.” To register and receive your book, contact Chris Murphy at cmurph3@luc.edu. And feel free to bring your lunch to the discussion. MORE

Catholic Minds, Catholic Matters Lecture Series

November 15 • 3:30–5:30 p.m.
McCormick Lounge • Coffey Hall

Andrew McKenna, PhD, professor emeritus of French language and literature, will lecture on the link between humanistic and religious traditions to form a critical understanding of institutional practices. MORE

Agape Latte

November 15 • 7:30–8:30 p.m.
The Den • Damen Student Center

This monthly speaker series offers a relevant and thought-provoking look at faith and its place in our daily lives. The evening will include live music, a speaker, Q & A, coffee, and dessert. MORE

John Cardinal Cody Endowed Chair Lecture: ’What makes a Christian in the First and Second Centuries?’

November 16 • 4 p.m.
Piper Hall

Edmondo Lupieri, John Cardinal Cody Endowed Chair, hosts this lecture by Simon C. Mimouni, PhD, (Directeur d’études, École Pratique des Hautes Études [at the Sorbonne], Paris). MORE

Martyrs Award

November 16 • 3:30 p.m.
Information Commons, 4th Floor

Loyola presents its Martyrs Award to the Comisión Intereclesial de Justicia y Paz. The event will also feature a panel discussion in which Loyolans will reflect on their efforts to live out the Jesuit mission of the Salvadoran martyrs through community and peacebuilding efforts. DETAILS

Salvadoran Martyrs: Memorial Liturgy

November 16 • 5:15–6:15 p.m.
Madonna della Strada Chapel

This liturgy—which starts after the Martyrs Award presentation—will honor the lives of the six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and her daughter who were killed 25 years ago in El Salvador. A reception will follow.

Forum on Social Justice

November 19 • 10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m..
Cuneo Hall, Room 210

The School of Social Work, School of Social Work Student Organization, and the Social Workers of Color Alliance will be hosting the Social Justice Forum. This forum will seek to empower students to be active participants in social justice movements. MORE

Hunger Week
and food drive

Learn how you can help raise awareness about hunger here and abroad during Loyola’s annual Hunger Week. See Schedule

As part of the Presidential Inauguration festivities, Loyola is sponsoring a University-wide food drive for local pantries. Learn More

“Working together with every person of good will, we can make a big difference and help end hunger person by person, neighborhood by neighborhood.”
— Sister Alicia Torres, a 2007 Loyola graduate

Torres, who helps feed hundreds of families a month at Our Lady of the Angels, won $10,000 for charity in 2015 on a special Thanksgiving edition of the Food Network show “Chopped.” See Torres discuss her experience on the show and her time at Loyola—and how the University prepared her to lead an extraordinary life. Watch video

The Martyrs Award

On November 16, Loyola presented this year’s Martyrs Award to Justicia y Paz (Justice and Peace), a Colombian human rights organization. The award, now in its second year, honors the slain Salvadoran martyrs and their commitment to service and social justice.READ STORY

Men and women for others

These four Loyolans—a student, a professor, and two alumni—are living examples of St. Ignatius’s mission to serve others.

Aqela Rahman

Undergraduate student

“(My internship) taught me the role that social workers and government agencies play in helping immigrants in their new country—and it encouraged me to one day pursue a career in public service.”

READ STORY

Marcos Gonzales, S.J.

Recent graduate, social worker

“My parents were both farm workers in California. That experience for them has largely influenced my own commitment to working and walking with marginalized communities.”

WATCH VIDEO

Linda Tuncay Zayer, PhD

Associate professor of marketing

“What I try to teach students is that society is a stakeholder and the environment is a stakeholder. They also get to see how they can use their skills to make society a better place.”

READ STORY

Jackie Taylor (BA ’73)

Founder of the Black Ensemble Theater

“It’s the mission of the Black Ensemble Theater to eradicate racism. It’s not going to happen in my lifetime. My job is to plant the seed, water it, and make sure that it’s firmly in the ground so that it will grow.”

WATCH VIDEO

Photo contest

For this year’s contest, show us how you’re creating a more just, humane, and sustainable world in your everyday life. The top photos will be featured on Loyola’s social media accounts—plus the winner will receive Loyola swag. (Shown here is student Claire Kronenberger’s winning photo from 2015.)
Contest rules

A closer look at the Martyrs Memorial

To honor the eight Salvadoran martyrs, Loyola built a memorial on campus in 2010. The structure, which curves along the sidewalk on the northwest side of Madonna della Strada Chapel, contains the names of each of the victims. These are the stories behind those names.

  • Ignacio Martín-Baró, S.J. Born: November 7, 1942, in Spain A social psychologist and philosopher, Martín-Baró was a preeminent figure in the intellectual community. He studied theology in Europe and taught briefly at the University of Central America (UCA) before getting his doctorate in psychology from the University of Chicago.   •   After receiving his doctorate, Martín-Baró returned to UCA. In 1981 he assumed the position of academic vice-rector and was also the head of the Psychology Department, where he taught about the psychology of liberation. Called "Padre Nacho" by his rural congregation, Martín-Baró founded UCA's Institute of Public Opinion, which measured popular opinion about the civil war.   •   The night before his assassination, Martín-Baró spoke on the phone with his sister, who asked him if the war would end soon. His response? "A lot more people will have to die yet. A lot more people will have to die."

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Amando López Quintana, S.J. Born: February 6, 1939, in Spain López was a natural communicator with a passion for helping others. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1952 and would go on to study philosophy and classical humanities—and ultimately earn a doctorate in theology in France.   •   López returned to El Salvador to teach for a few years at the University of Central America before moving to Nicaragua. He returned to UCA in 1983 and eventually became the chair of the Philosophy Department. In his final years at UCA, he oversaw the campus's buildings and vegetable gardens.   •   Beyond the walls of UCA, López was the pastor of Tierra Virgen in the community of Soyapango. He also was an advocate for the nationwide literacy campaign headed by Fernando Cardenal, S.J., that reached hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J. Born: November 9, 1930, in Spain As a teenage seminarian in El Salvador, Ellacuría was known as the "Sun King" for his compelling presence. He would go on to study classical language, humanities, and philosophy in Ecuador before completing his doctoral studies in Spain. He also received an honorary degree from Loyola in 1986, just three years before he was murdered.   •   Ellacuría, who was the rector of the University of Central America, was a proponent of liberation theology and one of the loudest advocates for peace negotiations during El Salvador's civil war. He acted as an informal mediator between the guerrilla fighting forces Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN) and the Salvadoran government, which made him an enemy of the far right.   •   Despite several threats to his life, Ellacuría continued to work for peace and the rights of innocent Salvadorans until his death.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Segundo Montes Mozo, S.J. Born: May 15, 1933, in Spain Known as "Zeus" because of his long beard and tall build, Montes became a prominent figure in the intellectual community with his forceful and fiery energy. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1950 at the age of 17 and completed his novitiate at Santa Tecla, El Salvador, in 1951.   •   Over the next several years Montes taught physics, studied in Austria, and earned a doctorate in social anthropology in Spain. He returned to El Salvador in 1978 to become the chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Central America.   •   Like Ellacuría, Montes was a staunch advocate for the poor—and as such, he became a target of the political right. After "Death to the Communists of UCA" was painted on his car, Montes was asked about his safety. He simply said: "If they kill me, they kill me."

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Juan Ramón Moreno Pardo, S.J. Born: August 29, 1933, in Spain Moreno was a scholar, theologian, and key figure in the development of the University of Central America. He entered the Society of Jesus when he was in his early twenties and studied classical humanities in Ecuador. He then taught chemistry at the Jesuit College of Granada in Nicaragua.   •   It was not until 1965 that Moreno continued his own studies at St. Louis University in Missouri, where he earned a degree in theology. He then traveled to Rome to study Ignatian spirituality and to train young Jesuits. He eventually ended up in Panama, where he helped found the Ignatian Center of Central America.   •   In 1985 the Society sent him to UCA, and while he was there he organized the theological library, which would become one of the finest in all of El Salvador.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Joaquín López y López, S.J. Born: August 16, 1918, in El Salvador The oldest of the eight people killed, López was the only slain Jesuit who was born in El Salvador. He earned several degrees as a student in Texas and was ordained a priest in 1952 when he took his vows to the Society of Jesus.   •   López eventually returned to his native El Salvador and contributed to the University of Central America, but not as a professor. When engineering professor Jon Cortina, S.J., left to work among the repopulated communities of Chalatenango, López stepped in and took charge of the university's administration.   •   In 1969 López helped bring the Fe y Alegría (Faith and Joy) foundation to El Salvador to educate marginalized children, teens, and adults. Despite poor health, López dedicated much of his time and energy to the organization until his death at age 71.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Celina Ramos and Elba Ramos. Elba born: March 5, 1947, in El Salvador; Celina born: February 21, 1973, in El Salvador Elba Ramos was a cook and housekeeper at the University of Central America, and her husband, Obdulio, was a watchman and gardener at the college. Their daughter Celina was a high school student.   •   The family originally lived in a separate house on the UCA campus, but fearing for their safety, Elba and Celina moved into an empty room at the Jesuits' residence. The two were murdered in cold blood because the Salvadoran army did not want to leave any witnesses.   •   Obdulio found all eight bodies the following morning. He planted a circle of six red rose bushes for the Jesuits and two yellow rose bushes in the center of the circle for his wife and daughter. The roses still grow today.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture "Wounded Angel" by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London's Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

The Ignatian Way

Throughout the year, the Loyola community carries out the legacy of St. Ignatius by seeking God in all things and helping those in need. Visit our Flickr gallery to see how we keep his legacy alive in Chicago and beyond. SEE PHOTOS

Want to be a Jesuit?

In this new video, “The Journey to a Great Life,” five Jesuits in formation talk about their decisions to join the Society of Jesus. In addition to their deep love of God, they all have one thing in common: All five attended Jesuit high schools or colleges. “I got to know a couple of Jesuits on campus,” Daniel Gustafson, S.J., says in the video, “and I was really impressed by their humanity and their honesty.” Learn more at BeAJesuit.org. Visit website