Loyola University Chicago

Ignatian Heritage Month

A celebration of St. Ignatius and his legacy

St. Ignatius of Loyola encouraged his followers to seek God in all things, to serve those in need, and to become people for others. His mission can be seen in everything we do at Loyola—and it’s this living legacy that we celebrate throughout Ignatian Heritage Month. This year’s events carry special meaning because it is the 25th anniversary of the deaths of the Salvadoran martyrs. READ MORE

Calendar of events

Ignatian Heritage Month features more than a dozen events throughout November. Open the panels below for more information.

Ignatian Heritage Month Photography Contest

November 1–8

This year’s contest seeks photos that capture “living radically” in an Ignatian way. The top picture will be featured on Loyola’s social media accounts—plus the winner will receive a $200 gift card. CONTEST RULES

Blessing of the Bells

November 2 • 10:30 a.m.
Madonna della Strada Chapel

Come join us for the blessing of the new bells of Madonna della Strada at the 10:30 a.m. Mass. Celebrate with coffee in Palm Court immediately after the blessing.


Mass of Remembrance

November 2 • 5 p.m.
Madonna della Strada Chapel

Join us for Mass in Madonna della Strada, with a reception to follow.


Hunger Week

November 3–9
Various times and locations

Help educate, advocate, and raise money to end hunger. This year’s beneficiaries include A Just Harvest, the Society of St. Andrew, and The Hunger Project. EVENT SCHEDULE

Women and Leadership:
Church and World

November 4 • 4:30–6 p.m.
Kasbeer Hall • Corboy Law Center

Panelists Carol Fowler, Shirl Giacomi, Sheila O'Brien, and May Ann Smith will discuss their reflections on the Church—and challenge us all to be agents of social change. LEARN MORE

Chicago Catholic Immigrants
Conference: The Mexicans

November 7, 8 • 9 a.m.–6 p.m.
McCormick Lounge • Coffey Hall

The Hank Center offers the second in a series of conferences that focuses on the historical, cultural, and religious roles that Roman Catholicism played in the lives of Chicago immigrants. CONFERENCE DETAILS

Jesuits on Tap

November 9 • 8:30 p.m.
Lu’s Deli • Baumhart Hall

Come share drinks, food, and stimulating conversations with some of Loyola’s finest—the Jesuits.

Movie screening: ‘Hit & Stay’

November 11 • 4:15 p.m.
Damen Student Center Cinema

Join filmmaker Joe Tropea for a screening of his award-winning 2013 documentary “Hit & Stay,” about Vietnam-era raids on draft board offices by Catholic radicals protesting the war. WATCH TRAILER

Movie screening: ‘Romero’

November 11 • 6 p.m.
Loyola University Museum of Art

“Romero” is a 1989 American biopic depicting the life of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, who organized peaceful protests against the violent military regime—protests that eventually cost him his life.

Ignatian Heritage Month
Book Club

November 12 • noon–1 p.m.
Corboy Law Center • Room 727

Come discuss “Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion,” by Gregory Boyle, S.J.

Finding Go(o)d in All Art

November 12 • 6–8 p.m.
The Den • Damen Student Center

This gallery event stems from the Jesuit value of finding God in all things, or finding the good in all things. The event will explore how and where students may find God (or good) and translate that into their art. LEARN MORE

Ignatian Heritage Month
Book Club

November 14 • noon–1 p.m.
Stritch School of Medicine • Room 250

Come discuss “Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion,” by Gregory Boyle, S.J.

Ringing of the Bells

November 16 • 10:30 a.m.
Madonna della Strada Chapel

After Mass, the new bells of Madonna della Strada will be rung for the first time in honor of the 25th anniversary of the deaths of the Salvadoran martyrs.

Ignatian Heritage Month
Book Club

November 19 • noon–1 p.m.
Piper Hall • Room 201

Come discuss “Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion,” by Gregory Boyle, S.J.

The Ellacuría Tapes:
A Martyr at Loyola

November 19 • 12:30–2 p.m
Crown Center • Room 530

In 1986 Loyola awarded an honorary doctorate to Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J., rector of the University of Central America. Three years later he was one of the eight martyrs slain in El Salvador. Come to a launch party of an online exhibit about Ellacuría and his time at Loyola.

RACE Lecture Series

November 19 • 4–5:30 p.m.
Information Commons • 4th floor

Hear Juan Perea and Steven Ramirez of the Loyola University Chicago School of Law discuss “Race and Racial Inequality: Through a Legal Lens.” LEARN MORE

Salvadoran Martyrs:
Memorial Liturgy

November 20 • Noon–1 p.m
Madonna della Strada Chapel

This liturgy—with special presider Jon Sobrino, S.J.—will honor the lives of the six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and her daughter who were killed 25 years ago in El Salvador.

Salvadoran Martyrs:
Address by Jon Sobrino, S.J.

November 20 • 6 p.m
Mundelein Center • Mundelein Auditorium

Loyola is honored to host Jon Sobrino, S.J., for an address commemorating the 25th anniversary of the deaths of the Salvadoran martyrs. Sobrino will discuss “A Community of Blood: Jesuits, University Professors, and Worker Martyrs.” REGISTER NOW

Salvadoran Martyrs:
Academic Roundtable

November 21 • 9:30 a.m.–noon
Information Commons • 4th floor

A panel of experts will discuss “Memory and Hope: The Salvadoran Martyrs, Prophetic Witness, and the Future of Jesuit Higher Education.” Jon Sobrino, S.J., will provide responses. LEARN MORE

Remembering the Salvadoran martyrs

On November 16, 1989, members of the Salvadoran military murdered six Jesuit priests and two others at the University of Central America. Jon Sobrino, S.J., (right) who taught at the university but was out of town when the victims were killed, will visit Loyola in November. DETAILS

News coverage from 1989

The slayings occurred during a prolonged civil war between the Salvadoran government and leftist opposition groups. The war was controversial in the United States because the Reagan Administration gave aid to the Salvadoran military in an effort, it said, to stem the spread of communism.

VIDEO: Watch the ABC News coverage of the slayings from 25 years ago.

A closer look at the Martyrs Memorial

To honor the eight Salvadoran martyrs, Loyola built a memorial on campus in 2010. The structure, which curves along the sidewalk on the west side of Madonna della Strada Chapel, contains the names of each of the victims. These are the stories behind those names.

  • Ignacio Martín-Baró, S.J. Born: November 7, 1942, in Spain A social psychologist and philosopher, Martín-Baró was a preeminent figure in the intellectual community. He studied theology in Europe and taught briefly at the University of Central America (UCA) before getting his doctorate in psychology from the University of Chicago.   •   After receiving his doctorate, Martín-Baró returned to UCA. In 1981 he assumed the position of academic vice-rector and was also the head of the Psychology Department, where he taught about the psychology of liberation. Called “Padre Nacho” by his rural congregation, Martín-Baró founded UCA’s Institute of Public Opinion, which measured popular opinion about the civil war.   •   The night before his assassination, Martín-Baró spoke on the phone with his sister, who asked him if the war would end soon. His response? “A lot more people will have to die yet. A lot more people will have to die.”

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Amando López Quintana, S.J. Born: February 6, 1939, in Spain López was a natural communicator with a passion for helping others. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1952 and would go on to study philosophy and classical humanities—and ultimately earn a doctorate in theology in France.   •   López returned to El Salvador to teach for a few years at the University of Central America before moving to Nicaragua. He returned to UCA in 1983 and eventually became the chair of the Philosophy Department. In his final years at UCA, he oversaw the campus’s buildings and vegetable gardens.   •   Beyond the walls of UCA, López was the pastor of Tierra Virgen in the community of Soyapango. He also was an advocate for the nationwide literacy campaign headed by Fernando Cardenal, S.J., that reached hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J. Born: November 9, 1930, in Spain As a teenage seminarian in El Salvador, Ellacuría was known as the “Sun King” for his compelling presence. He would go on to study classical language, humanities, and philosophy in Ecuador before completing his doctoral studies in Spain. He also received an honorary degree from Loyola in 1986, just three years before he was murdered.   •   Ellacuría, who was the rector of the University of Central America, was a proponent of liberation theology and one of the loudest advocates for peace negotiations during El Salvador’s civil war. He acted as an informal mediator between the guerrilla fighting forces Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN) and the Salvadoran government, which made him an enemy of the far right.   •   Despite several threats to his life, Ellacuría continued to work for peace and the rights of innocent Salvadorans until his death.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Segundo Montes Mozo, S.J. Born: May 15, 1933, in Spain Known as “Zeus” because of his long beard and tall build, Montes became a prominent figure in the intellectual community with his forceful and fiery energy. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1950 at the age of 17 and completed his novitiate at Santa Tecla, El Salvador, in 1951.   •   Over the next several years Montes taught physics, studied in Austria, and earned a doctorate in social anthropology in Spain. He returned to El Salvador in 1978 to become the chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Central America.   •   Like Ellacuría, Montes was a staunch advocate for the poor—and as such, he became a target of the political right. After “Death to the Communists of UCA” was painted on his car, Montes was asked about his safety. He simply said: “If they kill me, they kill me.”

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Juan Ramón Moreno Pardo, S.J. Born: August 29, 1933, in Spain Moreno was a scholar, theologian, and key figure in the development of the University of Central America. He entered the Society of Jesus when he was in his early twenties and studied classical humanities in Ecuador. He then taught chemistry at the Jesuit College of Granada in Nicaragua.   •   It was not until 1965 that Moreno continued his own studies at St. Louis University in Missouri, where he earned a degree in theology. He then traveled to Rome to study Ignatian spirituality and to train young Jesuits. He eventually ended up in Panama, where he helped found the Ignatian Center of Central America.   •   In 1985 the Society sent him to UCA, and while he was there he organized the theological library, which would become one of the finest in all of El Salvador.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Joaquín López y López, S.J. Born: August 16, 1918, in El Salvador The oldest of the eight people killed, López was the only slain Jesuit who was born in El Salvador. He earned several degrees as a student in Texas and was ordained a priest in 1952 when he took his vows to the Society of Jesus.   •   López eventually returned to his native El Salvador and contributed to the University of Central America, but not as a professor. When engineering professor Jon Cortina, S.J., left to work among the repopulated communities of Chalatenango, López stepped in and took charge of the university’s administration.   •   In 1969 López helped bring the Fe y Alegría (Faith and Joy) foundation to El Salvador to educate marginalized children, teens, and adults. Despite poor health, López dedicated much of his time and energy to the organization until his death at age 71.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

  • Celina Ramos and Elba Ramos. Elba born: March 5, 1947, in El Salvador; Celina born: February 21, 1973, in El Salvador Elba Ramos was a cook and housekeeper at the University of Central America, and her husband, Obdulio, was a watchman and gardener at the college. Their daughter Celina was a high school student.   •   The family originally lived in a separate house on the UCA campus, but fearing for their safety, Elba and Celina moved into an empty room at the Jesuits’ residence. The two were murdered in cold blood because the Salvadoran army did not want to leave any witnesses.   •   Obdulio found all eight bodies the following morning. He planted a circle of six red rose bushes for the Jesuits and two yellow rose bushes in the center of the circle for his wife and daughter. The roses still grow today.

  • Behind the memorial is the sculpture “Wounded Angel” by artist Emily Young. Created in 2003, the piece spent years in London’s Kew Gardens before coming to Loyola in 2010. Learn More

Take a ‘radical’ picture

This year’s Ignatian Heritage Month photography contest runs November 1–8 and seeks images that capture “living radically” in an Ignatian way. The top picture will be featured on Loyola’s social media accounts—plus the winner will receive a $200 gift card. RULES

Men and women for others

These four Loyolans—two students, a professor, and an alum—are living examples of St. Ignatius’s mission to serve others.

Jacob Guise

Business student

“I want to accomplish something for other people. This community, the city, my family, my friends gave me so much. There’s no reason why I shouldn’t be able to give back and help others.”

WATCH VIDEO

Michelle Lozano

Psychology student

“I’ve gained so much from my research (with the organization Girls in the Game). These girls need attention and support, and a lot of other resources that aren’t given to them.”

WATCH VIDEO

Clifford Shultz, PhD

Marketing professor

“I asked myself, ‘What do I want to do with my life? Do I want to find ways to sell financial services on Wall Street? Or do I want to use my craft in ways that could help the human condition?’ ”

WATCH VIDEO

Carmen Velásquez (BS ’63)

Founder of Alivio Medical Center

“We wanted access to health care for all, we wanted immigration reform, and we wanted to address the lack of bilingual and bicultural health professionals. … We wanted everything.”

WATCH VIDEO