Loyola University Chicago

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Loyola University Chicago

Department of History

Course Descriptions

History Core

Majors, please note you will need to take four core courses as indicated below:

European Hist Hist 101, 102 or 106 
American Hist Hist. 203 (103), 211 (111), or 212 (112) 
Non-Western Hist  Hist. 204 (104),208 (108), 209 (109), 210, or 213
Your choice Hist. 101, 102, 106, 203, 204, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213 . No duplications. 

History 101

The Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions to the 17th Century

See LOCUS for days & times                     

This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, early development and structure of Western civilization from the ancient world to the 17th century.  It covers the beginnings of civilization in the ancient Near East; Greeceand Rome; the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; the medieval civilization(s); economic change and geographical expansion of the west; the Renaissance and Reformation.  Throughout the course, political, social, and religious crisis and resolution will be emphasized, along with cultural responses to these events.  This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking and communications skills.

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline; be able to place Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in historical context; explain the expansion of the West; and develop their critical thinking and communications skills.


History 102

Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions since the 17th Century

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This course is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the development and structure of Western civilization from the 17th century to the present day.  It begins with the three great waves of revolution that have forged the modern world:  (1) a seventeenth and eighteenth-century intellectual revolution associated with science, rationalism, and secularism; (2) a wave of political revolutions (British, American, French, 1848 and Russian) that ushered in a new era of mass politics and nationalism; and (3) a commercial and industrial revolution that enormously expanded the productive capabilities of human societies.  It goes on to cover the nationalist movements of the nineteenth century; European imperialism and the road to World War I; the Russian Revolution, rise of Fascism, international depression and World War II; the Cold War and re-birth of Europe, and the rise of the European Union.  Throughout the course, political, social, and religious crisis and resolution will be emphasized, along with cultural responses to these events.  This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking skills.  It satisfies the values area by advancing an understanding of and promoting justice.

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of history as a discipline, develop critical thinking skills based on historical knowledge about the key people, places, and events that shaped the modern world, and hone their communication skills.


History 203

American Pluralism

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Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

American Pluralism is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present.  The course explores such issues as slavery and racism in American society, immigration and ethnicity, and religious diversity and intolerance.  Throughout, the course examines how these factors have influenced American national identity and how that identity has changed over time.  This course satisfies the historical knowledge area, develops critical thinking and communication skills, and satisfies the values area of diversity.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.


 

History 203-01W

American Pluralism

Dr. Buckley

 

 

MWF 8:15-9:05 am

 

 

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

American Pluralism is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present.  The course explores such issues as slavery and racism in American society, immigration and ethnicity, and religious diversity and intolerance.  Throughout, the course examines how these factors have influenced American national identity and how that identity has changed over time.  History 203-01W is writing intensive. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area, develops critical thinking and communication skills, and satisfies the values area of diversity.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

 

 

History 203-02W

American Pluralism

Dr. Buckley

 

 

MWF 9:20-10:10 am

 

 

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

American Pluralism is an introduction to history as a discipline, and an analysis of the origins, development and structure of the United States as a pluralistic and multiracial society from 1609 to the present.  The course explores such issues as slavery and racism in American society, immigration and ethnicity, and religious diversity and intolerance.  Throughout, the course examines how these factors have influenced American national identity and how that identity has changed over time.  History 203-02W is writing intensive. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area, develops critical thinking and communication skills, and satisfies the values area of diversity.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge, draw links between the American experience and national identities, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

 

History 204

Global History Since 1500 (INTS 104)  

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Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course deals with the emergence of the modern world by describing and analyzing the encounters and interactions between and among various political entities, cultures, and societies that have over the last several centuries produced this world. While the historical development of individual political or cultural units is a priority, the course also considers important topical aspects of early modern and modern global history. Among the topics considered are the expansion and intensification of cross-cultural interaction, especially trade; the appearance,  expansion, and decline of large empires together with associated phenomena such as imperialism, colonialism, and nationalism; the spread of information, knowledge, and technology and their role in the development of such institutions and ideas as science, capitalism, industrialism, and popular sovereignty; and the struggles for justice in all arenas of life including race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the historical roots of their own cultures and will have a deeper appreciation of their place in the contemporary world. Instructors may choose to explore the topics by emphasizing them in the context of their own areas of historical expertise. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area, develops critical thinking and communication skills, and satisfies the value of understanding diversity in the world.

Outcome: Students will be able to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; demonstrate how the encounters/changes between and among societies produced the world we have today; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources and how they relate to the history under discussion.

 

History 208

East Asia in the Emergence of the Modern World  

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(INTS 108)(ASIA 108)

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course explores the roles and contributions of the major East Asian States during the formation of the modern world from the sixteenth century to the present.  During the first three centuries of this period while Chinareached what was in some ways the heights of traditional economic, political, and cultural  development, Japanbuilt upon its recent political unification to begin laying the groundwork for the transition to modernity.  The nineteenth and twentieth centuries saw Japanrise to great power status, fall into military confrontation and defeat, and rise again.  During the same period Chinastruggled to overcome both domestic and foreign obstacles to development which resulted in its many experiments with reform, revolution and new reforms.  During the entire period Koreasought to find a safe middle ground between its two powerful Asian neighbors even as the mid-twentieth century and after Cold War confrontations pulled it apart.  This course satisfies the historical knowledge area, develops critical thinking and communication skills, and gives students an understanding of diversity in the world.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate and explain the forces of historical continuity and change; understand the relationships among historical events, cultures and social forces; analyze and discuss the significance of primary and secondary sources.

 

History 210-001

Introduction to Latin American History

Dr. Berger                                       

 TTH 2:30-3:45 pm

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course explores the formation of modern Latin America by examining the region as a global nexus where ideologies, cultures, peoples, and political entities have conjoined and clashed from the fifteenth century to the present.

Outcomes: Demonstrate and ability to evaluate and explain forces of historical continuity and change. Demonstrate and understanding of the relationships among historical events, culture and social forces. Differentiate between students' values and ways of understanding the world & those of other cultures.        

  

 

History 211         

 The United States to 1865                 

  See LOCUS for days & times

  

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Topics under discussion include the growth and development of democratic government, the formation of a diverse society; the expansion of the national territory; and the crisis over slavery and secession. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking and communication skills.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of theUnited States, and the impact of slavery.

 

 

History 211-052

 The United States to 1865         

  Dr. Donoghue

  TTH 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the colonial era through the Civil War. Topics under discussion include the growth and development of democratic government, the formation of a diverse society; the expansion of the national territory; and the crisis over slavery and secession. This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking and communication skills.  This section is restricted to students in the School of Education.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of Native American societies, the impact of European colonization, the creation and evolution of democratic institutions in a multicultural society, the geographic expansion of theUnited States, and the impact of slavery.

 

History 212        

  The United State Since 1865

  See LOCUS for days & times

 

Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course is an introduction to the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics under discussion include the growth and development of modern industrial society; the development of the general welfare state; the emergence of the United Statesas a world power; the debate over civil rights and civil liberties; and the evolution of the political culture of the United States.  This course satisfies the historical knowledge area and develops critical thinking and communication skills.  It satisfies the values area by advancing an understanding of diversity in the United States.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of how theUnited Statesbecame a modern industrial society, the emergence and evolution of the modern welfare state, the rise of theUnited Statesas a global power, and the impact of controversies over civil rights and liberties on American society.

 

History 213-001               

 Introduction to African  History

  Dr. Searcy

  MWF 8:15-9:05 am

 Requirement: HIST 101 or HIST 102 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later. No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in History.

This course surveys the history of Africa from dynastic Egypt to post-colonialism. The primary focus of this class is to examine the interactions African peoples had with non-Africans from the 15th century to the present.

Outcomes: Engage in critical thinking skills and disposition. Engage communication skills and sensitivities. Possess a heightened understanding of diversity in the world.

THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE ADVANCED-LEVEL COURSES

 

GENERAL ELECTIVE

 HIST 299-001

Contemporary Global Issues in Historical Perspective (INTS 298)           

      Dr. Ghazzal       

  MWF 11:30 am -12:20 pm

This course will introduce students to important contemporary issues such as globalization, resurgent ethnic and religious strife, racism, imperialism, and the crisis of the nation state, among others. Both thematic and chronological approaches will be employed in examining selected world regions.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the way history shapes pressing issues in the contemporary world, the way a historical approach helps make sense of these same issues, and the value of comparative study and analysis across time and place.

HIST 299-002

Contemporary Global Issues in Historical Perspective (INTS 298)

Dr. Biletz

 MWF 12:35-1:25 pm

This course will introduce students to important contemporary issues and examine them in their historical context.  Among the topics to be treated will be the impact of globalization; the revival of nationalism, including conflicts in the former Yugoslavia; ethnic conflict in Africa, including the Rwandan genocide; and the rise of militant Islamic radicalism, including al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the way history shapes pressing issues in the contemporary world, the way a historical approach helps make sense of these same issues, and the value of comparative study and analysis across time and place.

 

HIST 299-002

Contemporary Global Issues in Historical Perspective (INTS 298)

Dr. Biletz

 MWF 2:45-3:35 pm

This course will introduce students to important contemporary issues and examine them in their historical context.  Among the topics to be treated will be the impact of globalization; the revival of nationalism, including conflicts in the former Yugoslavia; ethnic conflict in Africa, including the Rwandan genocide; and the rise of militant Islamic radicalism, including al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the way history shapes pressing issues in the contemporary world, the way a historical approach helps make sense of these same issues, and the value of comparative study and analysis across time and place.

HISTORICAL METHODS  (Department Permission required.  E-mail pclemen@luc.edu with your name, the last two digits of your student ID number, registration appointment time and the specific section and instructor you choose. Please secure permission as soon as possible as students are admitted to the course on a first-come, first- serve basis.

 

 

History 291-01W

Historical Methods (Major Requirement)           

 Dr. Suszko

 T 6:00-8:30 pm

This course studies the ways historians arrive at their interpretation of events. This is accomplished through a history of historical writing or through a special selected topic that illustrates the use of different methods by past and present historians.  Students are expected to take this course after completing their four introductory courses for the major.  This course is writing intensive and restricted to declared history majors. Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of history.

Outcome: Students will understand that history is not a set of facts but a discipline that depends on competing paradigms and the ongoing interpretation of primary sources.   

 

History 291-02W

Historical Methods (Major Requirement)

 Dr. Hemenway  TH 4:15-6:45 pm

This course studies the ways historians arrive at their interpretation of events. This is accomplished through a history of historical writing or through a special selected topic that illustrates the use of different methods by past and present historians.  Students are expected to take this course after completing their four introductory courses for the major.  This course is writing intensive and restricted to declared history majors. Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of history.

Outcome: Students will understand that history is not a set of facts but a discipline that depends on competing paradigms and the ongoing interpretation of primary sources.   

History 291-03W

Historical Methods (Major Requirement)

 Dr. Fraterrigo  M 2:45-5:15 pm

This course studies the ways historians arrive at their interpretation of events. This is accomplished through a history of historical writing or through a special selected topic that illustrates the use of different methods by past and present historians.  Students are expected to take this course after completing their four introductory courses for the major.  This course is writing intensive and restricted to declared history majors. Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of history.

Outcome: Students will understand that history is not a set of facts but a discipline that depends on competing paradigms and the ongoing interpretation of primary sources.   

History 291-04W

Historical Methods (Major Requirement)

 Fr. Schloesser  MW 12:00-1:15 pm

This course studies the ways historians arrive at their interpretation of events. This is accomplished through a history of historical writing or through a special selected topic that illustrates the use of different methods by past and present historians.  Students are expected to take this course after completing their four introductory courses for the major.  This course is writing intensive and restricted to declared history majors. Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of history.

Outcome: Students will understand that history is not a set of facts but a discipline that depends on competing paradigms and the ongoing interpretation of primary sources.   

 

PRE-1700 EUROPEAN HISTORY

 

HIST 300-003

The Age of Tutankhamun

Ms. Lorenz

MWF 12:35-1:25 pm

 The Age of Tutankamun provides students with an in depth look at 200 years of Egyptian history, society, religion, culture, and international relations during the 200 years known as the 18th dynasty in the Egyptian New Kingdom. During this periodEgypt becomes an Empire and is one of the most powerful and wealthiest countries of the Ancient Near East. This course will examine both primary evidence and secondary literature about various aspects of this period to provide the students with a snap shot of Ancient Egypt during  its most successful and extravagant period. Students will exam and discuss issues like colonization, trade, religious extremism, and daily life. People such as The Hykos, Tutmosis III, Hatshepsut, Amenhotep III, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, and, of course,Tutankamun will be discussed in detail.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with a sophisticated ancient empire through a careful look at a paradigmatic era. Through a reading of primary and secondary sources they will explore the intimate relationship between the state and religion, the development of trade and the expansion of imperial control.

 

Hist 300B-001

Barbarians and the Fall of the Roman Empire

Dr. Dossey

 MWF 10:25-11:15 am

 

This course examines the interaction between Romans and the so-called “barbarians” such as the Goths, Vandals, and Huns from the 2nd to the 6th centuries CE. We will be addressing issues such as: the late Roman military – whether the enemies were getting stronger or the Roman military weaker; the “movement of peoples” - whether the collapse of Han China and political changes in central Asia pushed new ethnic groups toward the Roman Empire; the ethnic identity of peoples like the Goths or Huns – were they Roman constructs or did they have some basis in reality (as assessed by archaeology and scientific evidence such as the isotopic analysis of bones); the incorporation of immigrants - both how well the Romans integrated them and how modern attitudes toward immigration have influenced the scholarship on ancient “barbarians.” Readings will be a mix of recent secondary scholarship and primary sources. In addition to a midterm and final exam, students will be a writing a medium length (12 page) research paper based on primary sources.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

 

Hist 330A-001

English Social History: 1450-1750

Dr. Bucholz

 MWF 1:40-2:30 pm

This is a course in the social and cultural history of early-modern England. It focuses, in particular, upon the tension between how early modern English men and women saw their world (ordered, hierarchical, stable, divinely sanctioned) and what their world was actually like (disordered, socially mobile, unstable, secular).

Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of the best and most recent work in demography, iconography, family history, women's history, and the histories of material culture, popular culture, religion, education and crime, and be exposed both to a wide variety of historical methodologies as well as related fields such as anthropology and art history.

 

HIST 340-001

Russia pre-1917: Empire Building

         Dr. Khodarkovsky

 1:00-2:15 pm

By the middle of the 19th century Russiaemerged as the largest land empire in the world.  How did Russia survive the ravages of the Mongols under Chinggis Khan, the reign of terror under Ivan the Terrible, westernize under Peter the Great, open itself to new ideas under Catherine the Great, while it continued to preserve an oppressive institution of serfdom and remained a deeply divided society ready to explode in 1917.

Outcome: Students will be able to explain how Russia survived the ravages of the Mongols under Chinggis Khan, the reign of terror under Ivan the Terrible, westernization under Peter the Great; opened itself to new ideas under Catherine the Great, while it continued to preserve an oppressive institution of serfdom and  be able to demonstrate knowledge of methodologies and the technical vocabulary of classical archaeology.

 

POST-1700 EUROPEAN HISTORY

 

HIST 304-009

The Holocaust and Twentieth Century Genocide (PAX)

         Dr. Lefkovitz

 TTH 2:30-3:45 pm

This course explores cases of genocide in the twentieth century and analyzes the Holocaust in depth as its principal laboratory.

Outcome: Students acquire a sense of the causes, processes and implications of recent genocide.  They are challenged to develop the outlines of a theory for predicting when genocide is likely to occur and to provide a clear definition of the term. Most important, they articulate from the historical data ways to prevent genocide.

HIST 321A

Germany in the 19th Century

         Dr. Dennis

 TTH 1:00-2:15 pm

This course will investigate major themes of nineteenth-century German history.  Against the background of political and social developments we will carefully consider responses to these issues by leaders in German cultural life.  Using literary, political and philosophical texts—as well as visual arts and music—we will investigate intellectual currents under the following headings:  Storm and StressGermany, Romantic Germany, Idealist Germany, Young Germany, Dionysian Germany and WilhelmineGermany.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

HIST 323-001

Twentieth-Century Peacemaking

Dr. Moylan

 

W 4:15-6:45 pm

 

 The course examines the development and use of peace making tools in the twentieth century through the study of individuals, institutions and historical practice.

Outcomes: Students will demonstrate understanding of the language of peace research and the historical development of peace making tools in written and oral presentations and collaborative research projects.

 

HIST 340-001

Russia pre-1917: Empire Building

           Dr. Khodarkovsky

 

TTH 1:00-2:15 PM

 

By the middle of the 19th century Russiaemerged as the largest land empire in the world.  How did Russia survive the ravages of the Mongols under Chinggis Khan, the reign of terror under Ivan the Terrible, westernize under Peter the Great, open itself to new ideas under Catherine the Great, while it continued to preserve an oppressive institution of serfdom and remained a deeply divided society ready to explode in 1917.

Outcome: Students will be able to explain how Russia survived the ravages of the Mongols under Chinggis Khan, the reign of terror under Ivan the Terrible, westernization under Peter the Great; opened itself to new ideas under Catherine the Great, while it continued to preserve an oppressive institution of serfdom and remained a deeply divided society ready to explode in 1917.

 

ADVANCED U.S. HISTORY

 

HIST 300D-001

Slavery: Then and Now

Dr. Donoghue

 TTH 2:30-3:45 pm

The course will introduce students to the long durée of global slavery as a means to convey slavery’s ubiquity across time and space.  Slavery has been part of the human condition since the advent of recorded history and has been practiced in various forms by all the peoples of the world.  Starting with ancient and classical history and moving all the way into the present, students will confront how societies determined who could and should be enslaved. In the process, they will learn how this process dialectically generated concepts of liberty that evolved in tandem with the development of the world’s slave societies. Ultimately, approaching our subject in this fashion will equip students to grapple with the difficulty of arriving at both a historical and trans-cultural definition of slavery.  Perhaps counter to our expectations, defining slavery thus helps us move beyond rhetorical constructions of freedom to inquire, in existential terms, into the true substance of liberty. 

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 300D-002

Italians in Chicago

Dr. Candeloro

 W 4:15-6:45 pm

The History of Italians in Chicago offers an in-depth look at one of Chicago's important ethnic groups. Class presentations, readings and student projects will focus on the trends and personalities in the immigration process, neighborhood history, social mobility, the labor movement, politics, business, organized crime, the impact of Fascism and World War II, and the post World War II migration of Italians to Chicago. Researcher and author Dominic Candeloro will make extensive use of guest presenters from the fields of sociology, literature, and the arts. In addition to mastering the course material in class sessions and the readings, students will do a hands-on written or media project derived from primary sources.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues. 

 

HIST 300D

Women's and Gender History: USA

Dr. Nickerson

 M 4:15-6:45 pm

This course examines women’s history in the United States from 1900 to the present day. We will study a range of female experiences across class, race, ethnic and religious lines, following women as they participated in the century’s major social, political and cultural developments. Themes will include: women’s work; recreation and the family; political movements; and the formation of gendered racial identity. We will use different types of texts to cover this breadth of experience, including autobiographies, documents from the time period, and historical monographs. The class will examine the ways in which women’s sense of self, private and public experiences, and status have changed over time. Since this is an upper-level writing-intensive seminar that meets once a week, students should be prepared to write several papers, including a final research paper. Attendance and participation are required.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

HIST 376-001

History of the American Frontier Movement

Dr. Karamanski

 TTH 1:00-2:15 pm

The territorial expansion of the American people across the North American continent is one of the main themes of United States history.  This course examines the process of frontier expansion in chronological sequence from the colonial period through the end of the nineteenth century.  Particular attention is devoted to the cultural impact of the frontier on America, in the past and in the present.  The course will examine the frontier as both a process as well as a place, a borderland of conflict and cooperation between European-American pioneers and Indian, Mexican, and Canadian peoples.  Among the topic considered in the course will be: Indian-white encounters, the U.S. land survey system, Texas revolution, Mexican War, Oregon Trail, California Gold Rush, Transcontinental Railroad, cowboys, gunfighters, and the development of western movies.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

HIST 380-001

African-American History Since 1865

Dr. Manning

 TTH 2:30-3:45 pm

This course will overview important elements of Black history from the Reconstruction to the early phases of the direct action Civil Rights Movement.  Points of discussion within the class will be Blacks' role in Reconstruction; early efforts of community building and empowerment; urbanization in the first and second great migrations of Blacks to the North; the flowering of Black culture in the Harlem and Chicago Renaissances; the growth of Black political power; the Civil Rights movement; and Black America after the movement.  Upon completion of this class the students should have a broad understanding of recent African American history and culture.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 392-001

History of Sexuality in U.S.

Dr. Matelski

 MWF 9:20-10:10 am

This course provides a historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the United States from the precolumbian period to the present.  The primary emphasis concerns the impact of social and political change on sexual norms and behavior.  Particular attention is paid to changing standards of sexual morality, the evolving of boundaries of sexual behavior, and their effect upon the structure and organization of the American family, physical intimacy and personal identity over the past three and one-half centuries.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

HIST 394-01W

The Sixties

Dr. Lapsley

 MWF 10:25-11:15 am

This course covers the turbulent years from 1960 to 1974, during which political activism on a grand scale reawakened in the U.S.  It explores the relationships between the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the anti-war movement, the Women’s Movement, and the counterculture, as well as their impact on American society. This course is writing intensive.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

HIST 394-02W

The Sixties

Dr. Lapsley

MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

This course covers the turbulent years from 1960 to 1974, during which political activism on a grand scale reawakened in the U.S. It explores the relationships between the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, the anti-war movement, the Women’s Movement, and the counterculture, as well as their impact on American society. This course is writing intensive.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

 

NON-WESTERN HISTORY

 

HIST 296-200

Women in East Asia

Dr. Valussi

 MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

In this course, we will discuss gender images and roles in East Asian societies from a historical perspective.China,JapanandKoreaall have very traditional Confucian understandings of gender within society and family. We will focus on how gender roles have formed within each traditional society, as well as how these roles were challenged by contact with the Western world. Moving towards the modern era, and towards more extensive contact with Western ideologies and practices, we will discuss how Marxism, feminism and globalization differently affected the power relations between genders within each country, and find out if responses to this encounter in the three countries were different. We will also tackle the question of  how economic development and modernization have modified the traditional roles of men and women, and how these shifts are portrayed in popular culture. All of these questions will be discussed in class, bringing historical and contemporary examples to bear.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with a non-Western society’s traditional approach to issues of women and gender and the effects that contact with Western cultures had on that traditional approach. They will gain a sense of history as a laboratory for encountering the Other.

 

HIST 300-002

The Age of Tutankhamun

 Ms. Lorenz

 MWF 12:35-1:25pm

The Age of Tutankhamun provides students with an in depth look at 200 years of Egyptian history, society, religion, culture, and international relations during the 200 years known as the 18th dynasty in the Egyptian New Kingdom.  During this periodEgyptbecomes an Empire and is one of the most powerful and wealthiest countries of the Ancient Near East.  This course will examine both primary evidence and secondary literature about various aspects of this period to provide the students with a snap shot of Ancient Egypt during its most successful and extravagant period. Students will exam and discuss issues like colonization, trade, religious extremism, and daily life.  People such as The Hyksos, Tutmosis III, Hatshepsut, Amenhotep III, Akhenaten, Nefertiti, and—of course—Tutankhamun will be discussed in detail.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with a sophisticated ancient empire through a careful look at a paradigmatic era. Through a reading of primary and secondary sources they will explore the intimate relationship between the state and religion, the development of trade and the expansion of imperial control. 

      

HIST 300E-003

Islam in the Sudan and in the Horn of Africa 

Dr. Searcy 

MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

Beginning with the seventh century and moving forward to the early twentieth century, this course will explore the myriad of ways in which Islam spread through the Nilotic Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somali. We will learn about various influences on the development of Islam in the Sudan and in the Horn of Africa, including trade and Islamic mysticism, and will explore questions of Islamic identity.

Outcome: Students will gain familiarity with the topic; the ability to make connections between secondary and primary sources; and the capacity to think critically about the ways that historians have approached major issues.

HIST 313 -001

The Modern Middle East (ISW)

   Dr. Ghazzal  MWF 1:40 – 2:30 PM

 MWF 1:40-2:30 pm

This course surveys the modernMiddle East, with a focus on the Arab world. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the Ottoman background; the age of imperialism; and the 20th century, and be able to approach the period from an anthropological as well as historical perspective.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the Ottoman background; the age of imperialism; and the 20th century, and be able to approach the period from an anthropological as well as historical perspective.

 

HIST 345-01W

Reform and Revolution in China: 1800-1949

Dr. Allee

TTH 1:00-2:15 pm

The course will explore China's attempt to adjust to the complex transformations in its economy, society, politics and intellectual life initiated during the early modern period and transfigured into crises proportions by unchecked demographic growth.  These challenges were heightened and made more acute by the often hostile encounter with first the West and then Japan through the end of World War II.  The focus will be on the numerous evolutionary and revolutionary strategies for change during the period. This course is writing-intensive.

Outcome: Students will be able to describe and assess the numerous evolutionary and revolutionary strategies for change during the period in China under discussion.

HIST 356-001

Caribbean and Central America: Colonial and Modern Times

Dr. Berger

TTH 11:30am-12:45pm

The European conquest and colonization of the Caribbean islands and Central America; the significance of the Caribbean region in world power politics from the early struggles for empire to the "Cuban Missile Crisis"; the Wars of Independence; problems of regionalism and nationalism in Central America, Cuba and Castroism; recent trends.

Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the significance of the Caribbean and Central America region in world, but especially U.S., politics since the nineteenth century and increasingly during the Cold War. Students will demonstrate an ability to draw comparisons and contrasts between nations in these regions, especially as they relate to the rest of Latin America and the United States.

SENIOR CAPSTONE

 

HIST 300-05W

Senior Capstone:  Community and Self

 Dr. Roberts

 T 2:30-5:00 pm

The topic of the Senior Capstone in Fall 2012 is “Community and Self.”  The relationship between the individual and the community has long been of interest to historians.  A community might be constituted by a geographically-bounded space – a neighborhood, a city, the state – or by a bond of shared interests – race, class, gender, religion, work, or politics.  Community also has a more subjective connotation, encompassing people’s sense of belonging and of collective identity.  While communities depend on networks of, and social interactions between, individuals, many women and men come to question their relationship to community.  For all who derive their sense of self from participation in a community, there are just as many who develop their sense of self in opposition to a community.

In this writing-intensive course, students will develop their own research projects based around this theme of Community and Self. These projects, which will culminate in a major research paper based on primary sources, can explore any region or time period in history. Topics can be as diverse as Roman Catholic Orders in seventeenth-century New France to twentieth-century Branch Davidians, eighteenth-century cultures of print to twenty-first century social media like Facebook, heroes embraced by the nation or outcasts who seek belonging far from home.

The purpose of the course is for students to produce a significant history research paper (15-20 pages) based largely on primary sources, though of course secondary sources will be used as well.  Primary sources are the writings, art, artifacts etc. produced by people living in a particular period; secondary sources are histories (books and articles by modern writers) written about that period.  In the process of undertaking this project, students will create a bibliography, research in primary sources, write a paper, and present a brief final report at a festive departmental colloquium.  Any students interesting in applying to humanities graduate programs should seriously consider taking this course.

Department permission is required. Please e-mail pclemen@luc.edu with your name, the last two digits of your student ID number, and your registration access time.

 

HONORS TUTORIAL

HIST 397-02W

Honors Tutorial: Community and Self

 T 2:30-5:00 pm

 Dr. Roberts

The topic of the History Honors Tutorial in Fall 2012 is “Community and Self.”  The relationship between the individual and the community has long been of interest to historians.  A community might be constituted by a geographically-bounded space – a neighborhood, a city, the state – or by a bond of shared interests – race, class, gender, religion, work, or politics.  Community also has a more subjective connotation, encompassing people’s sense of belonging and of collective identity.  While communities depend on networks of, and social interactions between, individuals, many women and men come to question their relationship to community.  For all who derive their sense of self from participation in a community, there are just as many who develop their sense of self in opposition to a community.

In this writing-intensive course, senior Honors students will develop their own research projects based around this theme of Community and Self. These projects, which will culminate in a major research paper based on primary sources, can explore any region or time period in history. Topics can be as diverse as Roman Catholic Orders in seventeenth-century New France to twentieth-century Branch Davidians, eighteenth-century cultures of print to twenty-first century social media like Facebook, heroes embraced by the nation or outcasts who seek belonging far from home.

The purpose of the course is for students to produce a significant history research paper (25-30 pages) based largely on primary sources, though of course secondary sources will be used as well.  Primary sources are the writings, art, artifacts etc. produced by people living in a particular period; secondary sources are histories (books and articles by modern writers) written about that period.  In the process of undertaking this project, students will create a bibliography, research in primary sources, write a paper, and present a brief final report at a festive departmental colloquium.  Any students interesting in applying to humanities graduate programs should seriously consider taking this course.

The course is restricted to History Honors students and department permission is required. Please e-mail pclemen@luc.edu with your name, the last two digits of your student ID number, and your registration access time.

 

History 398-022

History Internship 

Dr. Roberts

 TBA

Internships allow students to earn three course credits while gaining valuable professional experience in public and private institutions engaged in history-related projects.  Internship possibilities include historical associations and societies; oral history projects; museums and halls of fame; entrepreneurial history firms; genealogical services; preservation agencies; and archives and libraries.  Interns work for a minimum of five hours per week in an internship position jointly agreed upon by the student and the internship director.  Interns are also required to attend seminar meetings, keep a weekly blog, and write a paper related to the internship experience.  Students need the permission of the internship coordinator in order to register.  Applications for the program are available on the web at http://www.luc.edu/history/internships.shtml and should be turned in to the History Department office, Crown Center 503, during the Fall 2011 semester. Finalized contracts must be returned to the Department prior to the end of late registration; failure to return finalized contracts in a timely manner may result in forfeiture of internship.   For further information, please contact Dr. Kyle Roberts (kroberts2@luc.edu).

Outcome: Students will be able to obtain an internship position, to learn on-the-job from an experienced practitioner in a wide variety of public and private sector settings, to draw links between their present situation and historical research, and to develop critical thinking and communication skills.

 

HIST 399-024

Directed Study

Dr. Gilfoyle

This course provides students with the opportunity to work under the direction of a faculty member on a particular area of interest that is not part of the department’s usual curriculum.  

Prior Permission of Instructor required.  Director Study form must be completed, approved and signed by instructor, and submitted to Dept. Secy. in CC 503 no later than the workday prior to end of late registration.  Inquire in CrownCenter503.

Outcome:  Students will gain an understanding of a specific area of history through the close reading of selected texts and the preparation of a research paper.

Loyola

Department of History · 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660 · Crown Center, 5th Floor
Phone: 773.508.2221 · Fax: 773.508.2153

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy