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Loyola University Chicago

Gannon Center for Women and Leadership

Faculty Fellows

Spring 2014

Dawn A. Harris, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Management, Quinlan School of Business

Project: Women Moving into Corporate Leadership Positions at Best Practice Companies

This research project builds on a previous article that received widespread media attention and was published in the Academy of Management Perspectives journal with my co-authors Constance Helfat and Paul Wolfson (Dartmouth College). Based on this data set of nearly 10,000 individuals, which yielded a comprehensive census of top executives in U.S. Fortune 1000 firms in 2000, a new analysis will be conducted to identify companies that have successfully moved women into the very top executive ranks and the approaches used by these best practice companies. The data analysis will develop results-oriented criteria for evaluating company success in promoting women to top leadership positions.

Relatively little work has focused on how a woman's choices can affect her career success. The research results will provide implications and recommendations for women to choose companies and industries that will promote women at different stages of their career (i.e., early in their careers, when switching companies, and when re-entering the corporate workforce). In addition, lessons from the best practice companies will assist companies with hiring, promoting, and retaining promising women in leadership positions.


Spring 2014

Michelle Nickerson, Ph.D., Associate Professor
History Department

 Project: The Camden  28: Fratres Sororesque in Pace

 The Camden 28 was a community of peace activists--men and women--who joined similar units around the country to disrupt conscription operations to protest U.S. sponsored aggression in Vietnam. The group's weeks-long intricately planned action to invade the Federal Building and burn draft cards might have succeeded had the F.B.I. not managed to recruit a secret informant to infiltrate the conspiracy. Though caught red-handed, the Camden 28 escaped conviction in what Supreme Court Justice William Brennan describes as one of the "great trials of the twentieth century." The defendants represented themselves and won a full jury acquittal.

The Camden 28 worked in unison with other "Catholic Left" groups to deploy creative non-violence in America's eroding industrial sector. I am interested in how raiders drew from church doctrine, ethnic working-class identity, and the Catholic worker movement to develop a gritty rustbelt masculinity that shaped their critiques of the war and corporate capitalism. Though fully reliant on its female and male participants alike, Catholic Resistance nevertheless acquired a band-of-brothers image. The Camden 28, like the Catonsville 9, the Harrisburg 7, and the Milwaukee 14 cultivated themselves as hard-edged peace warriors in defiance of a military industrial complex that poached young men from the urban poor. These Christian activists claimed to have destroyed over a million U.S. selective service documents between 1967 and 1973. Many Americans are familiar with the heroic brother priests, Phillip and Daniel Berrigan, who launched the movement with the Catonsville raid, evaded arrest through the assistance of a sympathetic Catholic underground, galvanized other raiders, and eventually served several years in prison. Yet no scholar has written a historical monograph about the Camden 28 or systematically explored the role of women. Not only does this story diverge from the traditional narratives of secular campus protest and take place in a city Americans would prefer to ignore, but those 28 names do not include the famous "Berrigan." It is for all these reasons that I am interested in the Camden 28.


ROBYN K. MALLETT, Ph.D. - Spring 2013

Robyn Mallett, Assistant Professor of Psychology, is conducting research on the factors that affect women’s responses to sexual harassment. Many people expect that a “reasonable person” would make an assertive response to sexual harassment. In fact, United States’ law relies on a reasonable person standard when evaluating sexual harassment cases. If sexual harassment occurred, then a woman is expected to make an immediate and assertive attempt to stop the harassment. Yet existing research finds that assertive confrontation is the exception rather than the rule. This research project investigates how the situation in which sexual harassment occurs may reduce assertive responses, including direct confrontation of one’s harasser. Women face the “double bind” of being both respected and liked in the workplace. If a woman’s only goal was to be respected, then responses to sexual harassment would commonly include confrontation of the offensive behavior. However, women must also gain and maintain the liking of their colleagues and supervisors in the service of getting or keeping a job. This competing goal to be liked may make women more hesitant to confront because they believe that doing so may put their job in jeopardy. Understanding the situational factors that reduce assertive responses may remove some of the burden from the targets of sexual harassment and change expectations for what constitutes a reasonable response. Results of this research will be disseminated through teaching, publication, and presentations on campus and at national conferences.


JOHN DUGAN, Ph.D. - Spring 2010

John Dugan, Assistant Professor of Higher Education, currently serves as principal investigator for the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL), an international research program examining the influences of higher education on the development of college students' capacities for socially responsible leadership. Data from the study was collected at over 100 colleges and universities in the US, Canada, and Mexico and represent more than 115,000 respondents.  The study is theoretically grounded in leadership principles congruent with both social justice and feminist leadership philosophies. Data will be used to examine two major questions. First, what is the pathway through which college women's overarching leadership potential (i.e., leadership efficacy, leadership capacity, and leadership behaviors) is developed? Second, what leadership learning experiences contribute most significantly to increasing the leadership efficacy, capacity, and behaviors of college women? Significant impediments to women's attainment of positional leadership roles persist despite a half century of political and educational initiatives targeted at increasing gender equity (Carli & Eagly, 2007; Rhode & Kellerman, 2007). The fact remains that women do not advance to the highest leadership positions in the same numbers, at the same rate, or through the same paths as male colleagues; women often are expected to work harder, contend with hostile or dismissive environments, accept unequal pay, receive less developmental support and training, and are frequently excluded from critical social networks (Caldwell-Colbert & Albino, 2007; Eagly & Carli, 2007). Differential treatment hardly begins in the workforce, though, as it is also present in the educational pipelines purportedly designed to prepare women to assume successful leadership roles in their disciplines. Findings from this research will address educational pipeline issues directly. Result should inform women's studies scholarship, existing coursework on leadership and gender in the Higher Education graduate program, and educational practice related to developing women's leadership potential.


PRUDENCE A. MOYLAN, Ph.D. - Spring 2009

Prudence A. Moylan, Professor of History, is integrating her decade long work on women and men as peace activists in Britain into a book on gender and peacemaking in the twentieth century. She explores the collaboration and contention among peace activists, peace organizations and feminist campaigns for equality to explain the century long process of establishing gender equality in law and practice as an essential foundation for building a peaceful society. Feminist peace activism in the twentieth century always included an understanding that peace could only be built on a foundation of equal rights while men's peace activism focused primarily on issues of conscientious objection to military service and armaments limitation. Feminist women supported men in the peace campaigns they initiated and advocated for the inclusion of women's rights as a peace issue. They also recognized that they had to organize on their own behalf to gain equality within the peace movement as well as in national and international law. The book demonstrates the contribution of women's rights campaigns to creating a more inclusive and robust theory and practice of peacemaking for the twenty first century.


ANN M. SHANAHAN, M.F.A. - Spring 2009

Ann Shanahan, Assistant Professor of Theatre in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts, is conducting research on the subject of women and creative leadership in relation to domestic space, specifically houses. Celebrating the Gannon Center's "housing" in the beautifully renovated Piper Hall, and a career long fascination with women and houses in dramatic literature, this three-part project relates research and teaching to the potential of staging plays about women in Piper Hall. The work of this program will ultimately solidify a relationship between the Theatre and WSGS, benefiting both in material ways, enrich teaching and public visibility of both the Arts and Women's Studies in campus and Chicago communities, significantly advance the Gannon Center Mission in support of women and leadership, and benefit current students and alumni in education and career building for women in creative leadership. The three parts of the project include formal presentation of research from a book length project on women theatre directors in Chicago through organization of an event/lecture series on women, creative leadership, and concepts of home. In order to link the project to teaching, Ms. Shanahan will re-offer Women's Theatre Workshop and adapt A Room of One's Own, the metaphoric frame for the course, in conjunction. As a part of this course students may access the Women & Leadership Archives for material on women and theatre in Mundelein College as research for final original dramatic pieces. Finally, this project will explore the feasibility of staging plays about women and houses in Piper Hall with potential for creating a formalized program in coming years, housed in the Center, devoted to performing plays about women and supporting women in creative leadership. The final outcome of the fellowship program would be a staging of a pilot production in Fall 2010.




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