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Loyola University Chicago

University Core

Knowledge Area: Philosophical Knowledge

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate an understanding of philosophical questions and traditions.

Philosophical learning promotes informed reflection on various areas, topics, and figures in philosophy. Students should become familiar with influential philosophical questions, positions, and methods of inquiry, and they should develop intellectual attitudes that enable them to identify and assess implicit presuppositions, and to formulate and defend solutions to philosophical issues, including ethical issues.

Competencies: By way of example, Loyola graduates should be able to:

Philosophical Knowledge Courses

Foundational Course: Tier I (1 course required)

PHIL 130: Philosophy and Persons
This course examines the way philosophy looks for fundamental characteristics that identify life as a properly human life, asks about its ultimate meaning or purpose, and raises questions about what counts as a good life.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches of the philosophical question of what it means to be human.
 

TIER II Courses: (1 course required)

Requirement for all Tier II Courses:   PHIL 130 for students admitted to Loyola University for Fall 2012 or later.  No requirement for students admitted to Loyola prior to Fall 2012 or those with a declared major or minor in the Department of Philosophy or Department of Political Science.

PHIL 267: Aesthetics  (Formerly PHIL 167)
This course explores philosophical issues in aesthetics like the nature of art and beauty through, in part, service-learning in retirement communities and theaters, as examples.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of aesthetics and the value of leadership development and civic engagement.
PHIL 271: Philosophy of Religion (Formerly PHIL 171)
This course explores the development, not only of some classic positions within the philosophy of religion, but also of how these views have affected the formulation of more contemporary discussions

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the enterprise of using reason, broadly construed, to articulate issues arising out of religious belief and practice and to formulate and defend positions with respect to those issues.
PHIL 272: Metaphysics (Formerly PHIL 172)
This course examines the fundamental principles by which the nature of reality can be explained.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the central issues surrounding the field of metaphysics.
PHIL 273: Philosophy of Science (Formerly PHIL 273)
This course examines the nature of scientific knowledge and its claim to possess a distinctive method of inquiry.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the mode of inquiry which is the scientific method.
PHIL 274: Logic (Formerly PHIL 274)
This course is a detailed study of the deductive methods and principles of correct reasoning, from both the traditional and modern point of view. 

Outcome: Students will be able to formally analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the various aspects of argumentation.
PHIL 275:  Theory of Knowledge (Formerly PHIL 175)
This course examines both the nature and the reliability of human knowledge.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the study of knowledge.
PHIL 277: Aesthetics (Formerly PHIL 177)
This course will explore one or more of the following philosophical questions in aesthetics: What is art? What is good art (art evaluation or critical theory)? What is beauty? What is it about human nature that allows us to experience beauty?

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of beauty and the arts.
PHIL 279: Judgment and Decision-Making (Formerly PHIL 179)
This course examines the philosophical and psychological foundations of decision-making. 

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the principles of reasoning and decision-making.
PHIL 284: Health Care Ethics (Formerly PHIL 184)
This course studies philosophical ethics as practiced in the health care setting.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of traditional moral theories in a health care framework, as well as the varieties of ethical challenges facing contemporary health care.
PHIL 286: Ethics and Education (Formerly PHIL 186)
This course examines philosophical ethics as it informs and guides the activity of teaching.

Outcome: Students will be able to examine and assess various ethical theories, and apply those theories to ethical issues in teaching.
PHIL 287: Environmental Ethics (Formerly PHIL 187)
This course will look at various philosophical and ethical views on the relationship between humans and the natural world. Topics may include: pollution, animal rights, and natural resources.

Outcome: Students will develop critical thinking skills and gain knowledge in the areas of philosophy and ethics. Students will have opportunities to analyze, evaluate, work as team members, and engage with the community on environmental topics and so will be able to engage in civic and leadership activities.
PHIL 288: Culture and Civilization (Formerly PHIL 188)
This course examines the nature, causes, and possible future development of human culture and civilization.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the various approaches to the philosophical study of human culture and civilization.
PLSC 100: Political Theory
This course introduces students to the study of the perennial questions, traditions and concepts in the history of political thought.

Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the major concepts that organize and inform theoretical reflection on politics: human nature and the human good, theory and practice, natural law and natural rights, power and authority, consent and obligation, and so on.

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