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Loyola University Chicago

Department of Classical Studies

Descriptions - courses currently scheduled

Descriptions of Courses Currently Scheduled by the Department of Classical Studies


Fall 2015

University Core Literary Foundations (Taught in Translation)   

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-01C.....Class #3528.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:30pm.....CS 206
In this course, we will explore the human need to tell stories through three very different genres: ancient Greek tragedy, short fiction through the ages, and the twentieth century novel. We will also encounter ways of interpreting these diverse texts, from ancient theories to modern and post-modern views. Along the way we will continue to ask ourselves, "what is literature and why is it so important to humankind?"

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-02C.....Class #3529.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....CH 103
This is a class in learning to read and cherish Literature, in specific selections from the great Classics of ancient Greece and Rome, as a means of hearing again the voices, and the wisdom, of those long gone.  We will attempt to understand the very meanings of the word "literature" itself, and the sacred gift of reading in all our lives. Likewise, the  course will provide a comprehensive background to the geographical,  historical, societal, and cultural conditions which birthed this literature.  We will also become familiar with the elements of Greek and Latin, and their persistent word roots, in order to understand more fully the beauty of the structure of these literary works in the original.  And we will discover how the enduring Humanity underlying all the Classical works we read, along with a handful of contemporary echoes, can truly transform our lives.

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-03C.....Class #4138.....T-Th.....8:30am-9:45am.....CH 104
This is a class in learning to read and cherish Literature, in specific selections from the great Classics of ancient Greece and Rome, as a means of hearing again the voices, and the wisdom, of those long gone.  We will attempt to understand the very meanings of the word "literature" itself, and the sacred gift of reading in all our lives. Likewise, the  course will provide a comprehensive background to the geographical,  historical, societal, and cultural conditions which birthed this literature.  We will also become familiar with the elements of Greek and Latin, and their persistent word roots, in order to understand more fully the beauty of the structure of these literary works in the original.  And we will discover how the enduring Humanity underlying all the Classical works we read, along with a handful of contemporary echoes, can truly transform our lives.

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-4C.....Class #4139.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....CH 104

Interpreting Literature with Dr. James Keenan    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-5C.....Class #6141.....T-Th.....10:00am-11:15am.....LSB 212
In its first half, this section of UCLR 100 will use Homer’s Iliad (selections) as an inaugural text in confidence that the Iliad is not only a great story in its own right, the world’s first “war novel,” but a foundational text that leaves room for the telling of other such stories or sequels.

Some of these will be explored through readings in the second half from Sophocles (Ajax) and Euripides (Herakles, Trojan Women, Hecuba); Alice Oswald (Memorial: A Version of Homer’s Iliad); select World War I poets; and Eric. Maria Remarque (All Quiet on the Western Front).

Classical Studies (Taught in Translation)   

Art of Ancient Greece with Dr. Laura Gawlinski 
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 206-001.....Class #5365.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....DU 228

This course explores the art of ancient Greece chronologically, from the marble figurines of the Early Bronze Age islanders to the Parthenon of the Athenians, concluding with the artistic transformations following the conquest of Alexander the Great. We will examine different forms of art and architecture and how they were produced, including painted vases, bronze and
marble sculpture, and public and private buildings. In addition to recognizing technical and aesthetic qualities, we will also seek to understand the art in its context: its relationship to a particular moment in time, use as political propaganda and a representation of values, expression of status or gender, and interpretation by different audiences. We will also place Greek art in its geographical and historical framework by considering how it affected and was affected by its neighbors and how even today it continues to influence how we view what art is.

Classical Mythology with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class #4475.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....DU 004

A Tapestry of Stories from ancient Greece and Rome!
This course will introduce us to the early stories of Creation, the myriad beings both divine and human there generated, and the stories attending them as imagined and fashioned by the ancient Greeks, in particular. Classes will be accompanied by visual illustrations, illustrative scenes from films, and an analysis of word roots in both Greek and Latin which foster a deeper understanding of the languages in which these song and stories first originated.

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class #1043.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....DU 004

A Tapestry of Stories from ancient Greece and Rome!
This course will introduce us to the early stories of Creation, the myriad beings both divine and human there generated, and the stories attending them as imagined and fashioned by the ancient Greeks, in particular. Classes will be accompanied by visual illustrations, illustrative scenes from films, and an analysis of word roots in both Greek and Latin which foster a deeper understanding of the languages in which these song and stories first originated.

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Brian Lavelle    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-003.....Class #1045.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm..... DU 230

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-004.....Class #3262.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm..... CC 140

Offers core credit for “Literary Knowledge, Tier 2,” and “Critical Thinking Skills.” In this course we shall study the use of myth in literature by selected Greek and Latin authors from the eighth century BCE until the first CE.   Read in epic, lyric, and drama about how the world was believed to have come into being, how different gods obtained supremacy, and what they had to do with the lives of men and women.  Gods differed from mortals in their different powers and the fact that they did not grow old or die.  But gods also resembled mortals in the kinds of experiences in which they were engaged and the feelings they had about those experiences.  In our study we shall learn how myths can encode a society’s values, hopes, and fears.  They explain the significance of cosmological interpretations, the establishment and growth of social and religious institutions, and beliefs about gender relations, familial structures, and personal standards.  They dramatize the conflict individuals experience between what they want and what they are told they have to accept, between what they think is true or good and what others believe is right. They elucidate the power of the human imagination and of love even in the most adverse circumstances, such as in the face of failure, death, or oblivion. 

Important in our study is correlating with the literature evidence from other sources, such as art and architecture.  We’ll question how this information can help us understand people who lived thousands of years ago.  At the same time we shall work to find what we can still learn from them.  How can these stories from so long ago still relate to what we experience? Familial  relationships between spouses, parents and their children, siblings?  Getting ahead in life and achieving personal objectives but still finding ways to maintain friendships?  Acknowledging what we can do on our own and what we owe to some “higher power”?  Following through on what we know is right—even when everyone else thinks us mad?  Being a hero but then committing the worst kind of crime?  Committing the worst crime but then finding redemption?                                                                                                    

We shall work to place their stories in the context of the original audiences but also to find out how they can relate to our own lives and can help us develop a better understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live.

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Jacqueline Long   
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-001.....Class #3985.....M-W-F.....8:15am-9:05am.....CC 140

Students taking this Tier 2 Literary Knowledge Core course will engage with three cornerstone texts of Classical antiquity - the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid - in order to explore how storytelling, mythology, human relations, and transcendent values function within them. Why did ancient Greeks and Romans keep turning to these long poems in order to define what their civilizations were all about? How do they operate as literature? What ideas about "being heroic," leadership, community, home, gender, war, travel, loss, victory, and human aspirations do they reflect, and reflect upon, and change? Class meetings will center on collaborative discussion, with occasional forays into creative performance.

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Kirk Shellko    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-003.....Class #3987.....W.....7:00pm-9:30pm.....CC 140
   
This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid and endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts.  Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. They will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). They will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. They will be able to define and better understand the meanings of “hero” and “heroism.” Students will be able to express mature appreciation for the epics as whole works. Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems.                     

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-002.....Class #2130.....M-W-F.....9:20pm-10:10am.....CH 302
In this course, we will read great tragedies by all three surviving dramatists, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. We will examine questions of performance, origins, the rituals of tragedy, dramatic theory and many other interesting topics in pursuit of the answer to the question, "why do we enjoy watching tragedy happen to someone else?"

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Kirk Shellko     
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-003.....Class #2568..........7:00pm-9:30pm.....CC 140

Classical Tragedy introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myth" presented on the ancient Greek stage and how to apply what they have learned to detect and interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in them. They will learn the names, works and careers of the principal tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students will learn to assess the formal and aesthetic properties of the works of different tragedians. Emphasis will be given to specifics of performance and seeing a play in the "theater of the mind" as well as gaining command of relevant terminology, e.g., parodos, peripeteia, mimesis, catharsis, etc. Students will learn to outline the plot, argument and key themes of each work clearly and will gain an understanding of the historical context and social conditions motivating each work. The main themes of Greek tragedy (e.g., power, gender, justice, violence etc.) invite comparison to themes of contemporary theater and film. Students will acquire an awareness of ancient Greek tragedy in its connection with our own theatrical and literary culture, and will understand the influence of Greek drama on modern stage and literature. They will be able to employ several concepts in the analysis of Classical Tragedy.

World of Archaic Greece with Dr. Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Historical Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 274-001.....Class #5366.....TTh.....11:30am-12:45pm.....DU 231

World of Classical Rome with Dr. John Makowski
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 276-001.....Class #5367....MWF....12:35pm-1:25pm....DU 228

War and War Experience, Ancient and Modern with Dr. Brian Lavelle
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 281-01W (Writing Intensive).....Class #5368....T....4:15pm-6:45pm....IC 215

Roman Law with Dr. James Keenan    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 362-01W(Writing Intensive).....Class #5369.....T-Th.....1:00pm-2:15pm.....IC 111

An introduction to the general principles and basic concepts of Roman civil, or private, law. This encompasses the law of procedure, persons, property and obligations (i.e., contracts and “delicts”). The historical dimension stretches from the archaic Republican Twelve Tables, ca. 450 B.C., to Justinian's sophisticated imperial codification of the 6th century A.D. Special attention is directed to Roman law in its classical phase and to the roles played by the praetor (Rome’s chief judicial magistrate) and the jurists in shaping the strict rules of civil law to fit the requirements of an empire as it evolved from an early city-state. This semester’s focus is the law of delicts (property damage, roughly analogous to Common Law torts).

The Humanism of Antiquity I with Dr. Gregory Dobrov   
(This is a Capstone class)
CLST 383-001.....Class #1057.....M.....4:15pm-6:45pm..... MUND 4015

Ancient Greek    

Ancient Greek I with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
GREK 101-001.....Class #1929.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....MUND 415
A student-centered and hands-on initiation into Ancient Greek. You will gain the basic vocabulary and skills to read the original texts of Homer, Herodotus, Plato, the New Testament, and Church Fathers. Our textbook "From Alpha to Omega" (Ann Groton, Focus) is user-friendly and accessible. Along the way, you will learn a great deal about language in general.

Intro to New Testament Greek with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
GREK 267-010.....Class #5148.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC 572

Introduction to Greek Oratory with Dr. Gregory Dobrov
pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or equivalent
GREK 275-001...Class #6078...F...4:15pm-6:45pm---CC 572

Readings in Greek Literature I with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
GREK 388-003.....Class #4483.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC 572

Latin    

Latin I with Dr. John Makowski    
LATN 101-001.....Class #1928.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....DU-229

This course begins fundamental grounding in Latin vocabulary, forms, syntax, and reading. You will become able to read great literature as it was originally composed, and also to transfer your skills and understanding to English and other languages.

Introduction to Roman Prose with Dr. John Makowski    
LATN 271-001.....Class #5372.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....IC 215

The Age of Caesar with Dr. John Makowski    
LATN 283-001.....Class #5370.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am.....IC 215

The Orations of Cicero with Dr. John Makowski
LATN 325-001….Class#5371…..M-W-F…..10:25am-11:15am…..IC215

Spring 2015   

University Core Literary Foundations (Taught in Translation)    

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Thomas Keith    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-12C.....Class #3515.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:125pm.....MUND-414
In this course, we will explore the literature (both poetry and prose) of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome.  Through close reading and discussion, we will engage with texts of various genres, all of which attempt to answer fundamental questions about the human condition: do logic and order govern the universe?  Is justice divinely ordained, or a human construct?  How do we cope with the limitations imposed on us by our mortality?

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-13C.....Class #3779.....T-Th.....1:00pm-2:15pm.....SUL 203


Interpreting Literature with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-14C.....Class #3931.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....MUND-607
In this course, we will explore the human need to tell stories through three very different genres: ancient Greek tragedy, short fiction through the ages, and the twentieth century novel. We will also encounter ways of interpreting these diverse texts, from ancient theories to modern and post-modern views. Along the way we will continue to ask ourselves, "what is literature and why is it so important to humankind?"

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Thomas Keith
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-15C.....Class #4844.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....LSB 212
In this course, we will explore the literature (both poetry and prose) of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome.  Through close reading and discussion, we will engage with texts of various genres, all of which attempt to answer fundamental questions about the human condition: do logic and order govern the universe?  Is justice divinely ordained, or a human construct?  How do we cope with the limitations imposed on us by our mortality?

Classical Studies (Taught in Translation)    

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class #1075.....M-W-F.....9:20am-10:10am.....CH 104

A Tapestry of Stories from ancient Greece and Rome!
This course will introduce us to the early stories of Creation, the myriad beings both divine and human there generated, and the stories attending them as imagined and fashioned by the ancient Greeks, in particular. Classes will be accompanied by visual illustrations, illustrative scenes from films, and an analysis of word roots in both Greek and Latin which foster a deeper understanding of the languages in which these song and stories first originated.

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class #1076.....M-W-F.....2:45pm-3:35pm.....MUND 307

A Tapestry of Stories from ancient Greece and Rome!
This course will introduce us to the early stories of Creation, the myriad beings both divine and human there generated, and the stories attending them as imagined and fashioned by the ancient Greeks, in particular. Classes will be accompanied by visual illustrations, illustrative scenes from films, and an analysis of word roots in both Greek and Latin which foster a deeper understanding of the languages in which these song and stories first originated.

Classical Mythology with Dr.  Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-003.....Class #1077.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm.....DU-230

Offers core credit for “Literary Knowledge, Tier 2,” and “Critical Thinking Skills.” In this course we shall study the use of myth in literature by selected Greek and Latin authors from the eighth century BCE until the first CE.   Read in epic, lyric, and drama about how the world was believed to have come into being, how different gods obtained supremacy, and what they had to do with the lives of men and women.  Gods differed from mortals in their different powers and the fact that they did not grow old or die.  But gods also resembled mortals in the kinds of experiences in which they were engaged and the feelings they had about those experiences.  In our study we shall learn how myths can encode a society’s values, hopes, and fears.  They explain the significance of cosmological interpretations, the establishment and growth of social and religious institutions, and beliefs about gender relations, familial structures, and personal standards.  They dramatize the conflict individuals experience between what they want and what they are told they have to accept, between what they think is true or good and what others believe is right. They elucidate the power of the human imagination and of love even in the most adverse circumstances, such as in the face of failure, death, or oblivion. 

Important in our study is correlating with the literature evidence from other sources, such as art and architecture.  We’ll question how this information can help us understand people who lived thousands of years ago.  At the same time we shall work to find what we can still learn from them.  How can these stories from so long ago still relate to what we experience? Familial  relationships between spouses, parents and their children, siblings?  Getting ahead in life and achieving personal objectives but still finding ways to maintain friendships?  Acknowledging what we can do on our own and what we owe to some “higher power”?  Following through on what we know is right—even when everyone else thinks us mad?  Being a hero but then committing the worst kind of crime?  Committing the worst crime but then finding redemption?                                                                                                    

We shall work to place their stories in the context of the original audiences but also to find out how they can relate to our own lives and can help us develop a better understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live.

Classical Mythology with Dr. James Keenan    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-001.....Class #1809.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm.....MUND 406

“This course explores the fundamental myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans through study of the literature involving myth in its historical, social, and cultural context.” This is a core course in the knowledge area of literature, second tier, with a concentration on Greek mythological texts. The literary genres and qualities of the works will be noted, as will the distinction between oral and written storytelling and the effects of the transition from one to the other. Attention will also be directed to the stories themselves, their patterns, structures, and outlines, to how and why they are repeated in revised forms through the ages; to how they have served as vehicles for communicating and exploring the great issues of the human condition: suffering, knowledge and death; procreation and rebirth; the individual and society; Nature and Culture. The course syllabus is designed according to the human life cycle and its phases. The intended result is that the course, though presented in linear time, will itself reflect the cyclical patterns of myth from birth through coming of age to death and resurrection.

Classical Mythology-Women/Gender Focus with Dr. Laura Gawlinski
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking (section cross-listed with WSGS)
CLST 271G-010....Class #5143....M-W-F....10:25am-11:15am....MUND 408

This Tier 2 Literary Knowledge course explores the myths of the Greeks and Romans primarily through the close reading of ancient texts in English translation. As we read these weird and wonderful stories about gods and heroes, we will pay special attention to how gender and sexuality is represented within them. How can mythological writings provide evidence for the roles ascribed to men and women in the ancient world? How closely do the stories reflect reality, and whose reality is presented? We will also examine the purpose of these stories in their own time: did they function to reinforce the status quo in periods of social tension, or could they be subversive?

Heroes & Classical Epics with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore   
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-001.....Class #1078.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....MUND 307

"Quae regio in terris nostris non plena laboris?" [What land on Earth is not filled with our Work? - Virgil, Aeneid 1.420]
A beloved verse from Virgil, embedded in mosaic in the vestibule of the Madonna De la Strada Chapel and appropriated, for the Jesuit Order, from its original context with regard to the laborious policies and projects of the expansion of Rome, could also be applied to the majesty and might of the exacting study of ancient Epic. For the Epic has indeed pervaded Western literary tradition in the footprints and the dreams of these enduringly human characters and events which have survived, and shall survive, as long as these songs and stories. The purpose of this Course, with its exacting study through ancillary scholarship, is to raise our consciousness of these enduring human values and of their relevance to the heroic, and even to the non-heroic, in our own quotidian lives -- the heroes, both song and unsung, the singers and the silent, whose labors have extended and survived throughout all corners of earth. Because, as Homer wrote in both the Iliad and the Odyssey, the events in Epic were all ordained by Zeus "in order that there might be a song for those yet to be born."

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Brian Lavelle
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002....Class #1079....T-Th....10:00am-11:15am....DU 230 
This course focuses on the ancient Greek and Roman epic poems, the heroes and other characters in them, their values and conflicts.  The poems are about struggle, both internal and external, and about characters who resist those forces that push against them.  Though larger-than-life, the heroes and their struggles are reflections of human beings, human concerns, and human struggles.  Students will read and thoughtfully consider the Iliad, the Odyssey and the Aeneid as literature, but also as important depictions of humanity.  The centering questions and topics that students will confront are several.  What is the nature of an “epic”?  What are the ingredients of a “hero” and what makes or unmakes her or him?  What motivates an Achilles or an Odysseus?  Who constitutes the “supporting cast” and why is that cast so important?  What is the author actually trying to say to his audience about heroes and struggles?  Or, in brief, why do *we* bother to read the epics?  This course will focus upon appreciating the epics on their own terms, but also upon how they capture the “universals” of shared human experience.                                                                                                                                

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Lauren Schwartzman    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-001.....Class #2709.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20pm.....MUND 514
In this course, we will read great tragedies by all three surviving dramatists, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. We will examine questions of performance, origins, the rituals of tragedy, dramatic theory and many other interesting topics in pursuit of the answer to the question, "why do we enjoy watching tragedy happen to someone else?"

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Kirk Shellko     
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-003.....Class #3506..........7:00pm-9:30pm.....CH 116

Classical Tragedy introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myth" presented on the ancient Greek stage and how to apply what they have learned to detect and interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in them. They will learn the names, works and careers of the principal tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students will learn to assess the formal and aesthetic properties of the works of different tragedians. Emphasis will be given to specifics of performance and seeing a play in the "theater of the mind" as well as gaining command of relevant terminology, e.g., parodos, peripeteia, mimesis, catharsis, etc. Students will learn to outline the plot, argument and key themes of each work clearly and will gain an understanding of the historical context and social conditions motivating each work. The main themes of Greek tragedy (e.g., power, gender, justice, violence etc.) invite comparison to themes of contemporary theater and film. Students will acquire an awareness of ancient Greek tragedy in its connection with our own theatrical and literary culture, and will understand the influence of Greek drama on modern stage and literature. They will be able to employ several concepts in the analysis of Classical Tragedy.

Classical Tragedy with Dr. Patricia Graham-Skoul    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 273-004.....Class #5142.....T-Th.....2:30pm-3:45pm.....MUND 611

Provides core credit for “Literary Knowledge, Tier 2,” and “Critical Thinking Skills.” In this course we shall read about plays originally composed and performed in democratic Athens during festivals honoring the god Dionysos.  These plays dramatize legendary events in the lives of individuals who make decisions and undertake actions that lead frequently to tragic consequences.  You may pity these individuals and fear for the suffering that you know will have to happen.  But at the same time you will come to understand why they can inspire the deepest admiration.  You will see why they make those decisions that lead to suffering and why they could not have acted in any other way because of the individuals they are and the world in which they lived. You will appreciate why people so looked up to them and why people who followed after them continue to refer to them as examples of what is important in life.  We shall examine the tragic characters in both their public and familial context and realize the extent to which these domains cannot be separated.  We shall question furthermore the role that the gods play, the extent to which they influence human action, and the ways they reflect the most basic components of human character.

You have heard of ancient heroes like Oedipus, Prometheus, Heracles and Theseus, Odysseus and Agamemnon.  Now study the stories of these men and other men and women like them and find out why we still can learn from them.  Big topics for discussion include those of justice, free will, truth and honesty, loyalty, honor, friendship, and love. By studying these ancient Greek masterpieces you will learn about dramatic literature, the religious, socio-political, and intellectual background for that literature, and ways we can evaluate those accounts as we explore questions that continue to trouble, engage, and inspire us.

World of Classical Greece with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Historical Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 275-001.....Class #3933.....T.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CH 217

Classical Rhetoric (Writing Intensive) with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 279-01W.....Class #3934.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm..... IC 111

The art of persuasive speaking is the central topic of this course, which explores texts written in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds reflecting the theory and practice of this powerful and often ambiguous skill that is also central to the ways we live communally. Readings from Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato and Cicero, and a few sordid legal cases will also serve as texts from which students will develop critical-analytical writing skills in the form of short take-home assignments, in-class writing assignments, and lengthier essays.

Romance Novel in Ancient World with Dr. John Makowski
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 280-01W.....Class #5144....T-Th....1:00pm-2:15pm....IC 111

Romance Novel in Ancient World with Dr. Jonathan Mannering
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 280-002.....Class #5145....T-Th....10:00am-11:15am....CH 107

Attractive young people meet and fall in love at first sight over and over again in this course as we read numerous stories about passion, heartache, and overcoming obstacles (usually involving pirates), all leading to (mostly) happy endings. These stories were written in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds between the 1st and 4th centuries CE, and their long prose narrative form constitutes the origins of the modern novel. These stories are also the products of enduring literary traditions, and the course serves as a general introduction to the literature and cultural heritage of the Classical world.

Classical Comedy and Satire with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 283-001.....Class #4905.....M-W-F.....12:35pm-1:25pm.....CC-140

The Humanism of Antiquity II with Dr. John Makowski    
departmental major capstone
CLST 384-001.....Class #1082.....T.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....MUND 609

Classical Backgrounds I: Homeric Questions with Dr. James Keenan    
(Writing Intensive)
CLST 388-02W.....Class #4907.....T-Th.....11:30am-12:45pm..... CH 109
An examination of the Iliad and the Odyssey as interpreted by clinical psychologist Dr. Jonathan Shay against a background set by award-winning literature about the recent war in Iraq: Kevin Powers The Yellow Birds and Phil Klay Redeployment.

Ancient Greek    

Ancient Greek II with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: GREK 101 or equivalent
GREK 102-001.....Class #1812.....M-W-F.....1:40pm-2:30pm.....CC 140

Introduction to Plato with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or equivalent
GREK 262-010.....Class #5148.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC 572

Introduction to Greek Oratory with Dr. Gregory Dobrov
pre-requisite: GREK 101-102 or equivalent
GREK 275-001...Class #6078...F...4:15pm-6:45pm---CC 572

Readings in Greek Literature II with Dr. Gregory Dobrov    
pre-requisite: third-semester GREK or equivalent
GREK 389-001.....Class #3940.....F.....4:15pm-6:45pm.....CC 572

Latin    

Latin II with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
pre-requisite: LATN 101 or equivalent
LATN 102-002.....Class #1893.....M-W-F.....10:25am-11:15am..... MUND 520

Latin 102 follows the curriculum and class format of Latin 101 using Wheelock’s Latin as its guiding textbook. Students will be introduced to new linguistic concepts and morphologies and by the end of the semester will be familiar with all of the fundamentals of Latin and even become acquainted with short passages from Roman authors.

Age of Flavians with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
pre-requisite: LATN 101-102 or equivalent
LATN 287-001.....Class #6149.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20Pm.....IC 111

We will read selections of prose and poetry written by authors active during and in the immediate wake of the Flavian dynasty (69-96 CE) including Martial, Pliny the Younger, Statius, Silius Italicus and Juvenal. Some class time may be devoted to discussing scholarly literature on these and related authors. Grades will be based on quizzes, exams and class participation.

Juvenal with Dr. Jonathan Mannering    
pre-requisite: third-semester LATN or equivalent
LATN 346-001.....Class #6155.....M-W-F.....11:30am-12:20Pm.....IC 111

The Satires of Juvenal are the centering texts of this course which will also consider the tradition of Roman satire inherited by this author and his influence on subsequent generations. Grades will be based on quizzes, exams, class participation and a research paper.

 


Summer 2015   

University Core Literary Foundations (Taught in Translation)    

Interpreting Literature with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore   
Lakeshore Shore Campus Summer Session A
Literary Knowledge Tier 1 - Skills of Critical Thinking
UCLR 100-01C.....Class #2575.....M-T-W-Th.....10:25am-12:05pm.....DU 234
Through a variety of readings translated  from ancient Greek and Latin texts, 
woven together with some contemporary literature, this Course hopes to bring to our students an understanding of the transformative effect of literature -- poetry, stories, drama -- to change our daily lives and provide companionship for for the Journey.

Art of Ancient Greece (cross-listed with FNAR 336) with Dr. Brian Lavelle    
Rome Center Summer Inter-Session
Artistic Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 206-001.....Class # 2592.....M-T-W-Th-F....9:00am-4:00pm.....on-site in Greece

Classical Mythology with Dr. Greg Dobrov   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session A
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-01W.....Class # 1647.....M-T-W-Th....12:20pm-2:00pm.....MUND 609

This course is about ancient Greek myths of lasting value in their historical and cultural contexts. We will explore famous myths along with the names and functions of the most important characters. How did the ancients use traditional narratives and images to explain themselves and their surroundings? We learn how myth is interpreted (theories of myth) and methods of literary criticism (language, content, structure). We move chronologically from Creation to Heroes (epic) to Drama (tragedy). How do myths evolve with the specific agendas of authors, audiences and society?

Classical Mythology with Dr. Edith Pennoyer (Penny) Livermore   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session B
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 271-002.....Class # 2110.....M-T-W-Th....10:25am-12:05pm.....MUND 503
The peoples of ancient Greece, drawing on other traditions of the early Mediterranean, reveled in telling stories of their gods and goddesses, their demi-gods and heroes, as part of their sacred heritage.  These timeless tales really point to the enduring mysteries of the natural world and of our own humanity --and to the presence in All Things of the spark of the Divine.

Heroes & the Classical Epics with Dr. Kirk Shellko   
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session C
Tier 2 Literary Knowledge - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 272-002.....Class # 1508.....M-W....6:00pm-8:30pm.....MUND 605

This course centers upon the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid and endeavors to place these epic poems into their historical, social, and cultural contexts.  Students will learn the definition of epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved to reflect audiences and times. They will learn the components of epic language, in particular, literary devices and structural features (e.g., formulas, nested stories, epic similes). They will be able to describe the plots of the three epics and know the main- and mid-level human characters, gods, and goddesses. They will be able to define and better understand the meanings of “hero” and “heroism.” Students will be able to express mature appreciation for the epics as whole works. Learning how the epics are variously interpreted as well as basic methods of literary criticism (e.g., analysis of language, content, structure, etc.), students will employ these as ways to understand and interpret the poems.

Classical Comedy and Satire with Dr. Gregory Dobrov  
Lakeshore Campus Summer Session A  
Literary Knowledge Tier 2 - Skills of Critical Thinking
CLST 283-01W.....Class #2574.....M-T-W-Tr.....2:15pm-3:55pm.....MUND 609
This course begins with landmarks of ancient literature which are essential for the appreciation of contemporary satire: we will study Aristophanes and Plato to understand modern satirists from Lenny Bruce to Louis CK; The students are introduced to important theories of interpretation, theories of laughter and humor as well as “secondary” (critical) literature.  Discussion will open thoughts to differences of interpretation at various levels of analysis.  Students will also view and read and analyze modern video and written satire to supplement their primary and secondary readings.

Revised on 15 April 2015 by lhardison@luc.edu

Loyola

Department of Classical Studies · 1032 W. Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: 773.508.3650 · Fax: 773.508.2153 · E-mail: lhardison@luc.edu

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