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Loyola University Chicago

The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage

Faculty Reading Groups

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Faculty reading groups are one of CCIH’s Catholic Classic Projects.  The purpose of this project is to give Loyolans an opportunity to read and discuss important texts reflective of the Catholic literary heritage.  From antiquity to the 21st century, human beings have put into writing their adventures of exploring meaning in a world embraced by God.  These innumerable texts are not just a Catholic heritage, but a human heritage—one that CCIH invites all Loyola faculty to discover and enjoy.

Upcoming Faculty Reading Groups

Spring 2014
John L'Heureux: The Shrine of Altamira
"Mesmerizing...a powerful and affecting story about love's most anguished and disturbing permutations." --Timothy Hunter, Cleveland Plain Dealer.

First Meeting:

Faculty Reading Group A: Monday, February 10, 10:00am-11:30am
Faculty Reading Group B: Tuesday, February 11, 1:00pm-2:30pm

Second Meeting:

Faculty Reading Group A: Monday, February 24, 10:00am-11:30am
Faculty Reading Group B: Tuesday, February 25, 1:00pm-2:30pm

Please, sign-up by January 27 by e-mailing catheritage@luc.eud or calling 773 508 3820
Text, refreshments, and meeting space will be provided by CCIH.

Past Faculty Reading Groups

Fall 2013
Tony Ardizzone: In the Garden of Papa Santuzzu

Spring 2013
Edwin O'Connor: The Edge of Sadness

Fall 2012
Karen Blixen (Isak Dinesen): Babette's Feast, Sorrow-Acre and The Deluge at Norderney

Spring 2012
Graham Greene: The Power and The Glory & Monsignor Quixote Fall 2011Flannery O'Connor: The Complete StoriesBrad Gooch: Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor Spring 2011Catholic Poets from XIX to XXI Century Francis Thompson, Oscar Wilde, Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Gbriela Mistral, Antonnio Machado, Jessica Powers, John O'Donohue, Denise Levertov, and Mary Karr Fall 2010William T. Cavanaugh: The Myth of Religious Violence Summer 2010Georges Bernanos: The Diary of a Country Priest

Spring 2010
Thomas Berry: The Great Work: Our Way Into the Future

Fall 2009
Mary Gordon: Pearl

Summer 2009
Muriel Spark: Momento Mori

Spring 2009
Eugene O’Neill:  Desire Under the Elms, Mourning Becomes Electra, and Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Fall 2008
David Lodge: Souls and Bodies

Summer 2008
Shusako Endo: Silence Spring 2008G.K. Chesterton: The Blue Cross J.F. Powers: Death of a Favorite Muriel Spark: The Black Madonna Gerard Manley Hopkins: God’s Grandeur, Pied Beauty, Spring and Fall, Carrion Comfort

Fall 2007
Shusaku Endo: Mothers Denise Levertov: Mass for The Day of St. Thomas Didymus Mary Gordon: The Deacon Mary Karr: Poem series Descending Theology

Summer 2007
François Mauriac:  Vipers' Tangle

Spring 2007
Andre Dubus:  A Father's Story Flannery O'Connor:  The Lame Shall Enter First Annie Dillard:  An Expedition to the Pole Walker Percy:  excerpts from Lost in the Cosmos

 

Faculty Reading Group 2014

Faculty Reading Group 2014

Spring 2014 Faculty Reading Group

In The Shrine at Altamira (1992) the novelist John L’Heureux accomplishes the integration of his greatest literary art with his most profound theological drama.  Employing a Catholic imagination to explore themes found in the great Greek tragedies, he plumbs the spiritual depths of literature.  Just how difficult and deep the journey will be is forewarned in the novel’s prologue:  “This will be terrible; do not deceive yourself.  We hear stories like this on television but we do not look, and when they turn up in newspapers, we glance away, because we know there are crazy people and people who are mad with love, but we refuse to know any more than that.”  With a realist’s precision, L’Heureux portrays the inner mechanisms of two dysfunctional families—the alcoholism, the unstable personalities, the family violence—rushing to their inevitable, horrific ruin. 

A story of love and hatred, betrayal and revenge, purification and forgiveness, The Shrine at Altamira echoes the imaginative world of Flannery O’Connor, offering the reader a disturbing tale that calls into questions all our ideas about the human condition of modern life.

Faculty Reading Groups Meet at:

Loyola University Chicago
The Joan and Bill Hank Center for the
Catholic Intellectual Heritage
Cuneo Hall, Room 425
1032 W. Sheridan Rd.
Chicago, IL 60660

First Meeting:

Faculty Reading Group A: Monday, February 10, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Faculty Reading Group B: Tuesday, February 11, 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Second Meeting:

Faculty Reading Group A: Monday, February 24, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Faculty Reading Group B: Tuesday, February 25, 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

 

Please, sign-up by January 27 by e-mailing catheritage@luc.eud or calling 773 508 3820

Text, refreshments, and meeting space will be provided by CCIH.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2013 Faculty Reading Group

Faculty Reading Group

Greetings Faculty:

The Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage would like to invite you to join the Faculty Reading Group.

The Fall 2013 semester reading group is dedicated to the critically acclaimed American writer Anthony Ardizzone. He is a Chicago native, well acquainted with the city's ethnic neighborhoods, and is the author of eight books of fiction, including the novels Heart of the Order and The Whale Chaser.

The reading selection for this fall semester is Ardizzone’s novel In the Garden of Papa Santuzzu. It is an enchanting and moving story of a close-knit Sicilian family who left their motherland in search for a better life in the land of opportunities, La Merica.

The Faculty Reading Group book selection relates to the CCIH conference Chicago Catholic Immigrants: The Italians. The conference will take place on November 8-9 and will explore the influx of Catholic immigrants to America, and more specifically to Chicago, during the late 19th and early 20th century.

Those who participate in the Faculty Reading Group will have an opportunity to meet the author.

If you are interested in joining the Faculty Reading Group please sign-up by August 30 by e-mailing catheritage@luc.edu or step by our office at:

Loyola University Chicago
Cuneo Hall, Room 428
1032 W. Sheridan Rd
Chicago, IL 60660

Monday through Friday from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

We would appreciate if you indicate two week-days and times when you are available, since meeting dates will be determined based on the majority of the requests.

CCIH will provide texts, refreshments, and meeting space.

We look forward to seeing you. 

Loyola

The Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage
Loyola University Chicago · Lake Shore Campus: 1032 West Sheridan Road · Cuneo Hall, Room 428 · Chicago, Illinois 60660 · Tel: 773.508.3820 · Fax: 773.508.3829

Notice of Non-discriminatory Policy