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Loyola University Chicago

Quinlan School of Business

Entrepreneurship

New ventures are starting at a record rate and there’s no end in sight. The recent economic meltdown has forced many people to begin a business essentially to create a job for themselves. However, many of these businesses will not survive. Starting a business is more than opening a store or beginning a service. For a business to survive and grow today, business owners must understand how business works. Accounting, finance, marketing, economics, and management must all work together if the business is to sustain and grow.

The Basics

Explore Entrepreneurship

The Loyola Entrepreneurship Program applies these core business programs in a systemic setting to test and experience how each relates to and depends on the other. Through case studies, simulations, team projects, and working with local businesses, students are immersed into the real world of business and experience the challenges of change, competition, and an ever-demanding market.

So, welcome new business pioneers. Set your sights high, bring your ideas and passion for business, and get ready for a challenging and fun experience. 

At no time since the boom years of the 80’s and 90’s has the business world cried out for the vision, passion, problem-solving, and innovation skills of the entrepreneur. Today’s global economic turmoil has renewed the need for the entrepreneurial leader who can see through the chaos and uncertainty of these challenging times and plot a path for company renewal, turn-around or launching of a new venture.

The Loyola Entrepreneurship Program provides students with the necessary skills to successfully compete in this ambiguous environment. Students critically review their assumptions about corporate change and new venturing, and they explore the special demands and opportunities of the entrepreneurial challenge. Students learn about the strategic aspects of the entrepreneurial process starting with the identification of business opportunities, the development of unique business models, the formation of the entrepreneurial team, the securing of financial resources, and the importance and practical application of marketing, economics, accounting, finance, and management skills.

Entrepreneurs are often described as individuals who bring innovation to the market place. In this regard, the Loyola Entrepreneurship Program fosters innovative thinking and acting. Throughout the program, the advantages of innovation are examined and the myriad of challenges of bringing ideas to market are explored. Courses are designed not just to provide academic learning experiences but also real-life experiences. The close interaction with business practitioners, hands-on project work, and the balance of theory and application reinforces the relevance of a balanced entrepreneurship education.

Beyond the functional competencies, the major is also designed to foster social skills with an emphasis on leadership and critical thinking for the development of innovative and proactive minds. With these skills, students are being prepared to lead extraordinary lives either as corporate intrapreneurs or new venture entrepreneurs.

Throughout the coursework, emphasis is placed on the importance of creating meaningful ventures with a high degree of local, national, and international environmental and social impact. Loyola University’s international background, its international business network, and its international locations combined with the diverse background of its faculty and students, provides the framework to transform these challenges to reality.

Degree Requirements

In addition to Core Curriculum and Business Core Curriculum requirements, students pursuing the BBA degree majoring in  Entrepreneurship must complete 15 credit hours in the following courses:

Three Required courses:

Two Elective courses (select two of following):

Only one ENTR 399: Selected Topics class is allowed to count for this major/minor.

Important Details:

At the discretion of the Quinlan School of Business assistant dean, a maximum of one transfer course, taken prior to matriculating at Loyola University Chicago, may be allowed. A 2.0 average GPA is required for all attempted business courses. Quinlan students are limited to double dipping one course between majors/minors, while non-Quinlan students are limited to double dipping two courses between business school minors.

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